Microsoft’s marketing chief admits Windows 10 upgrade was pushed too aggressively

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft’s marketing chief admits Windows 10 upgrade was pushed too aggressively[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/12/8yqymt2caton6uv1-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Microsoft’s Chief Marketing Officer (CMO), Chris Capossela, has admitted that Microsoft has been too aggressive in pushing the Windows 10 upgrade. He admits that in a video interview with Microsoft watcher Paul Thurrott. The company received a lot of complaints and even got involved in several lawsuits thanks to its aggressive methods.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsofts-marketing-chief-admits-windows-10-upgrade-pushed-aggressively-81115/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsofts-marketing-chief-admits-windows-10-upgrade-pushed-aggressively-81115/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2785812]We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft’s marketing chief admits Windows 10 upgrade was pushed too aggressively[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/12/8yqymt2caton6uv1-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

            Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/microsofts-marketing-chief-admits-windows-10-upgrade-pushed-aggressively-81115/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.[/QUOTE]

Geeze whizz, I don’t think there was no such tactics… :Z

This is why I installed the disableGWX and windows10updatedisable Regedits to remove their malware notifications.

This story only came to light more because of the lawsuits in which they lost they had to come clean why else would they say it now. Complaints they just pass off as disgruntled users and that was that. But lawsuits where you cost users time/money that hits where it hurts for Microsoft their Funds and PR nightmare. That is the only way a company will admit fault. Otherwise complaints go into a black hole never to be seen again by the light of day.


#3

I hope it cost them billions since they caused a lot of problems with people computers


#4

Anyone still taking MS serious since they became the biggest spyware developer on this planet?

Win7 was their last good OS … after that it went steeply downhill in terms of quality and privacy.

MEH!


#5

First Rule of Thumb for Microsoft: It’s always easier to beg forgiveness after than to get permission before.


#6

Like I said at the time, these companies are almost certainly contravening the Computer Misuse Act & similar legislation.

Aren’t they lucky there’s nobody interested in enforcing the law. :rolleyes:

Oh well. Maybe we should take the view that they have set a precedent? I should be our defence if we install similar malware on their computers? Maybe something to stop them monitoring & uploading malware to our computers? Or a DDoS attack on the update servers?
Evil chuckle


#7

[QUOTE=Millennium12;2785873]Anyone still taking MS serious since they became the biggest spyware developer on this planet?

Win7 was their last good OS … after that it went steeply downhill in terms of quality and privacy.

MEH![/QUOTE]

Hmm, XP would be my best guess, Windows 2000 tool-wise.
They did move away from user privacy concerns ever since Vista and so Windows 7 really is no different, albeit a little more honed, not to our benefit.

However, as much as we like to keep it simple, there ought to be a formal limit as to how far you are allowed to take it. The individual’s RIGHT to privacy is trampled on and ‘Opt out’ simply does not cut it on the subject. Anything even remotely trampling on our RIGHT to privacy as previously mentioned should be strictly ‘opt-in’ with a clear short message about what you get and what you give up, written in a language meant to inform.
I think I mostly oppose to the sneakiness of this… please, for our children…


#8

I think I should reply to my own answer in the thread. It never was B/W and they want to retire svchost which is for the better, any single point of failure less, the better. I have earlier said that any OS release gathers more features than the former and that I think it is time to decentralize in the name of security. Maybe people don’t understand what I’m saying, but it is really all about the ‘attack surface’ (Good, now I even managed to attach the security aspect, we even have a right to that, it will be solved by 3rd-party in time though, but that, no matter how we see it, will be ‘opt-in’ by purchase or free). This is in reality what it is all about and in my mind, your right is my guiding star.