Microsoft promises faster boot times with Windows 8

Microsoft promises faster boot times with Windows 8.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2011/09/UZsub8.jpg[/newsimage]Not content with simply replicating Windows 7 boot times in its upcoming Windows 8 OS, Microsoft is speeding things up. And for good reason, explained Stephen Sinofsky, Windows Live President. "No feature gets talked about and measured more [than boot time]," wrote Sinofsky at the Building Windows 8 blog. Cutting down on boot-ups and minimizing the amount of reboots following patch downloads are core design tenets for Windows 8, he explained. However, the ultimate goal is faster boot times period. The executive claims it's mission accomplished. "We made a bigger leap in this area with Windows 8 than we have in a long time," said Sinofsky. 


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-promises-faster-boot-times-with-windows-8-51499/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-promises-faster-boot-times-with-windows-8-51499/)


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I don’t know about everyone else, but all my win 7 PCs, after get months of use, get to the login prompt very quickly but then take forever to load my account. Logging into a rarely used admin account is super fast.

Using my 4 win7 pcs experience and vista/xp experience, and then inclusive of other peoples work pcs which have the same trouble also, win 8 will have the same problem …

Yay!

What is needed is better user controls over what programs start up with Windows, and with your account settings. Unfortunately that isn’t likely since most users don"t have the capability to know which programs are necessary and which are not. Also, the attitude of every software company seems to be that they need to be running their little quick startup programs at the boot sequence, as if it’s assumed the user is always going to use their product every time they start their computer. MS Office… Adobe… Logitech… Printer utilities… I could go on, but all of these are unnecessary.

Same thought here. Also, I’m sure that the HP computer is running a clean install of the OS. Most recent HP laptops I see have so many extra’s (HP utilities, support, toolbars, update checkers, etc.) that most of the boot time is launching all the OEM pre-installed crap, which of course happens after all the drivers, etc. have been loaded.

One thing’s for sure, once Windows 8 is shipping, there will be no power button to the Google/Bing homepage in <10 seconds, with the exception of user’s own clean OS installation or resuming from standby. :disagree:

[QUOTE=debro;2603415]I don’t know about everyone else, but all my win 7 PCs, after get months of use, get to the login prompt very quickly [B]but then take forever to load my account.[/B] Logging into a rarely used admin account is super fast.

Using my 4 win7 pcs experience and vista/xp experience, and then inclusive of other peoples work pcs which have the same trouble also, win 8 will have the same problem …

Yay![/QUOTE]

I noticed that too however I found that by doing house cleaning at least once a month the system boots with seconds. :wink:

It was the same with XP and even win 98. The more software components you load or run after boot the more it slows the login time. Some virus scanners slow it down too. I remember wayyyyy back when I 1st installed a win 98 machine without any networking components. It booted so fast I couldn’t believe it. Then I added the ms networking and tcp/ip components because I was setting it up for Internet connection. Boot times slowed enormously right after adding those components. These are o/s components and so not really surprising but it still the same idea, the more you load the longer it takes.

Yo ivid

With no changes in the software components installed the boot time will increase over time, however cleaning house especially the registry hive (Current User) where registry errors are normally found on a regular basis, this will restore the quick startup.

If the system is being slowed down from software components at startup I suggest changing the setting within “Services” from automatic to automatic(Delay start) or even setting them to manual if they are not really needed at startup.

Just my findings and .02¢

The registry does not have significant effects on login times. What matters, that is the stuff you have on the desktop (instead of your documents folder.

Michael

[QUOTE=mciahel;2603473]The registry does not have significant effects on login times. What matters, that is the stuff you have on the desktop (instead of your documents folder.

Michael[/QUOTE]

I was mostly referring to over-all house cleaning, even though cleaning up the registry “does not have significant effects on login times” as you put it, getting rid of registry errors does help :smiley:

Again…Just my findings and .02¢

promises, promises

sigh

What micro s**t need to do is dump the registry and go back to the loading of 3.11, when you next switch on the screen and computer is exactly where it was when it was switched off!!

I’d love to see M$ dump the registry and force every vendor to use just their own directory. Program auto runs automatically disabled, unless the user specifically demands it.
Printer drivers, ati catalyst, intel/nvidia settings docks, sound card control panels, office accelerators,acrobat accelerators, virus’s and malware … bam, back to your directory for easy killing/deletion, rather than scatterred across the hdd, with references in the registry to obscure url’s and folder locations, hidden exe’s/dll’s.

The registry started out as a good idea, and ballooned into a monster.
Apart from the current users “my documents” location, why do other programs need to know the locations of everything, have access to all the users documentso, histories, entire hdd & etc?

Absolute Monstrosity!!!
Microsoft has forgotten the golden rule…kiss …keep it simple stupid.

At least they’ve made some attemp in windows 7 to clean up the previous system, but it’s still a mess.

[QUOTE=debro;2603586] Absolute Monstrosity!!!
Microsoft has forgotten the golden rule…kiss …keep it simple stupid.

At least they’ve made some attemp in windows 7 to clean up the previous system, but it’s still a mess.[/QUOTE]

As long as Programers are paid per line of code, Microsloth will continue to pump out Bloatware.

Far easier to have the End User buy faster CPUs and bigger drives than to actually produce “Functional and Optimised” code.
Today’s Snot Nosed Programers should be forced to program in Basic for an Atari or Commodore machine with a massive 64k of memory. They will then learn the tru meaning of “Optimized”.

[QUOTE=debro;2603586]I’d love to see M$ dump the registry and force every vendor to use just their own directory. [/QUOTE]

As far as I’m aware of, Linux does it this way. :slight_smile: All the software settings are stored in a hidden folder for that software in the user home directory. Some software ported from Linux even does this on Windows, e.g. GIMP stores its settings in the folder “.gimp”, but nothing other than file associations and uninstallation settings in the registry, for which Windows provides no alternative.

On the other hand, Linux does quite the opposite to Windows for the software itself. E.g. if you install something in Linux, chances are that it will also install a huge heap of dependencies for that software, some of which the user may have to manually obtain (and even compile.) If you later uninstall that software, those dependencies will remain unless manually uninstalled one by one and that’s assuming you took notice of them all. When I use to run Ubuntu on my Netbook, I ran into far more problems with dependency issues than I ever had with registry issues on Windows. :doh:

Maybe a hybrid solution would be nice - Windows’ ease and handling of installing and uninstalling software/drivers and Linux’s way of storing settings as individual files instead of a registry. :slight_smile:

Yo thanks StormJumper. I’ve actually been able to keep my 6 year old PC booting somewhat fast because I optimized it from the beginning. I read the “Radified partitioning strategies” before building my current PC. I recommend reading them.

One big reason Windows slows down over time for most people is because everything is installed on one big C: drive. Over time the drive fills up and your swap file and system files end up scattered all over and on the slower areas of the hard drive. They become fragmented all over a large partition but even a defrag doesn’t always help with huge amounts of data.
I kept my C: partition as small as possible, put the swap files on it own partition and my prog files on another or other physical drives etc… this guarantees my system files and swap are within fastest access area of the hard drive, forever.

I did get burned though, by making my C:\ too small, 12 GB. It was only Win XP so why would I need more on my C: drive if everything is installed on other partitions? Well thanks to goddamn “Docs and Settings” folder which at that time didn’t get bloated with GB’s of data like it does these days. Before iTunes and Chrome etc… filled these folders up.

Anyhow, this is a strategy that should be automatically employed by the O/S, optimizing the system file and swap with their own partitions etc… and doc and settings shouldn’t be locked to the C: drive !

BTW, all that said, one the recent BIG Windows updates I did within the last 8 - 12 months has slowed down my boot / logging times considerably :frowning:

Lol, all my documents are on a second partition, storage/finished torrents on a third and downloading torrents on a 4th, on my laptop.

After many times having windows crap itself for god knows what reason, taking much of the file system with it, it’s quicker to restore the os partition only, rather than everything, and less likely to lose your documents.
Nowadays, I usually put documents on a separate hdd, and backup to a nas every week, same with work pcs. Os on quick hdd, emails on secondary hdd our partition for laptops.

[QUOTE=Seán;2603646]
Maybe a hybrid solution would be nice - Windows’ ease and handling of installing and uninstalling software/drivers and Linux’s way of storing settings as individual files instead of a registry. :)[/QUOTE]

I am a big fan of portable software: everything needed is provided by the software developer and is located in software directory. No installation hassles, simply unpack an archive and everything is ready to be used. If you want get rid of software, simply delete the directory: no registry messing up, no risk to leave residual dependencies or libraries or whatever.

Some time ago I tried to discuss this opportunity in linux too, but according to the geeks (I’d like to use a different word, but foul language is not appropriate here :bigsmile:) this is a totally dumb idea :rolleyes:

[QUOTE=geno888;2603771]I am a big fan of portable software: everything needed is provided by the software developer and is located in software directory. No installation hassles, simply unpack an archive and everything is ready to be used. If you want get rid of software, simply delete the directory: no registry messing up, no risk to leave residual dependencies or libraries or whatever.

Some time ago I tried to discuss this opportunity in linux too, but according to the geeks (I’d like to use a different word, but foul language is not appropriate here :bigsmile:) this is a totally dumb idea :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]
The problem with this is that every program must maintain a copy of every library/program/dependency that it depends on.

So, for example:
Each game you install needs DirectX, each game installs it’s own copy of DirectX.
Each game needs OpenGL, so it install openGL.
Each games needs .net support, each game installs it’s own version of .net.

A 10GB game install quickly balloons to 25GB each game …

Repeat for each program.

On the other hand, if a program needs DirectX, directX is part of the “common files” part of the OS, it’s already installed … 40 games only need to install DirectX once.

That’s not to say that DirectX can’t be in it’s own freaking “Program Files/DirectX” directory though, rather than littered across the HDD, and .net is installed entirely in it’s own “program files/.net” directory.

Microsoft really to clean up their act, and sort out what part of windows is the kernel, and everything else is a program, third party drivers included.
Windows needs to know about the drivers/program, and that’s it, it’s loaded on demand.
A few key programs like (admin mode) explorer, task manager, regedit and msconfig need to be part of the windows kernel programs, in order to separate programs from essential OS utilities (for killing malware) … although with intelligent OS design, virus’s and Malware would be greatly reduced anyway.

Thanks for explanation :slight_smile:

I had no idea about this :doh:

Windows 8 cleaned up immensly. The policies (which are registry settings) load lightning fast.
You can read many more experiences right here.