Microsoft offers Windows 7 Family Pack for the holidays

vbimport

#1

Microsoft offers Windows 7 Family Pack for the holidays.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/09/y6GXn1.jpg[/newsimage]Microsoft will begin selling the Windows 7 Family Pack early next month in an effort to drive up demand for its latest generation OS leading towards Christmas.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-offers-windows-7-family-pack-for-the-holidays-33934/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-offers-windows-7-family-pack-for-the-holidays-33934/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I wonder if this kit will upgrade both 32- and 64-bit versions or if we would have to buy them separately.


#3

There are rumours, the kit will have installation media for both, 32 and 64 bit included.

Michael


#4

Tempting… very tempting…

AD


#5

Definitely a good incentive from Microsoft to get people to upgrade.


#6

I bought the family pack last year and it had both 32 and 64 bit disks in it. Pity they didn’t do a family upgrade like this for Office 2010, the version with Outlook in it.


#7

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2542142]Definitely a good incentive from Microsoft to get people to upgrade.[/QUOTE]Maybe, if the targeted end-users have Vista systems that are capable of running it. The vast majority are still running XP and in the current economy many can’t afford upgrading their hardware and the OS.


#8

Upgrading from XP32 to Win7 X64 supported? :slight_smile:
All correspondence to date suggests not!
Who actually owns vista and wants to update to Win7?

Have they patched the problem whereby you can install Win7 in demo mode, then “upgrade” the installed version to the full OS?


#9

[QUOTE=debro;2542235]Upgrading from XP32 to Win7 X64 supported? :slight_smile:
All correspondence to date suggests not![/QUOTE]Any upgrade from XP to 7 results in a fresh install. It does not matter if 32 or 64 bit.

Michael


#10

A better marketing campaign would be to simply SLASH the prices by a third rather than bundling three licenses together.

Seriously, what the hell were they thinking; many people don’t have three two computers in their homes let alone a third! How will this benefit them!?

Doesn’t say it can’t be used else where outside of the family home :wink:


#11

Yes it is, I upgraded from WinXP 32 to Win7 64 with no problem.


#12

Given how expensive MS charge people for their new operating system, the reason why people didn’t move from XP to Vista liked they hope isn’t because it was a disaster (Although that was due in part :doh: ) but because it was too damn expensive and didn’t work properly. :a

Why would ANYONE in the right mind upgrade an OS if their current (or predecessor) does exactly as it’s told and ultimately gets the job done? Vista and equally 7 aren’t just buggy, but if Windows XP worked for you, it makes it just pointless.

But it’s great to hear Windows are giving out a family pack for computers and laptops but whats the point when Windows XP does the job what you want it to, but $150 DOLLARS are simply too expensive and unworthwhile to recommend an upgrade.

Example, Windows Vista had been out just 18 months before Windows 7 was plumbed into the pipeline, and I can imagine Vista owners were severely bitten by an unusable operating system and angered it was going to be quickly superseeded.


#13

Upgrading from XP to Win7? Not too sure about that myself.

Even if the system in question would support it.

I have two HP notebooks that won’t upgrade to 7
so I run XP on them even though I have unused Vista Licenses for both of them.

My Dell notebook OTOH is running Vista and I’m not too fond of it.
My HP dc7800 system is factory Vista and I’d like to get rid of that too, but reverting it to XP? No.

Upgrading from Vista? Oh Yeah!

My HP dc7600 is running XP and frankly I’d be inclined to leave it alone.

THE reason for any “upgrading” would be for newer application software compatibility…

Support is the issue.

When Microsoft or whomever brings out new browsers the web site designers gradually drop support for the older browsers and if your OS won’t support the newer browser version you are SOL with a computer that essentially no longer has web access.

That Is why I recently retired the last few Win2k systems that were in my area of responsibility, as you say… it worked… until it didn’t anymore.

Somewhere around here I still have one of those systems.
Yes, it still works… “sorta”… But “Sorta” doesn’t get the job done.

The handwriting is already on the wall for XP… or atleast the beta version of XP’s death will soon be released in the form of IE9
which allegedly isn’t supported by IE8

and sometime in the next year to 18months when YouTube drops support for IE8 and you can no longer view videos…

unless you can make computer evolution stop the only thing to do is roll with it…

AD


#14

I’m strongly considering moving from 64-bit Vista to a 64-bit Windows 7. There may not be a huge difference in performance, but I’ve used 7 long enough at work that I’m ok with making the switch.

It’s time for a clean install on my home PC anyway.


#15

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2542337]
THE reason for any “upgrading” would be for newer application software compatibility…

Support is the issue.

When Microsoft or whomever brings out new browsers the web site designers gradually drop support for the older browsers and if your OS won’t support the newer browser version you are SOL with a computer that essentially no longer has web access.

That Is why I recently retired the last few Win2k systems that were in my area of responsibility, as you say… it worked… until it didn’t anymore.

Somewhere around here I still have one of those systems.
Yes, it still works… “sorta”… But “Sorta” doesn’t get the job done.

The handwriting is already on the wall for XP… or atleast the beta version of XP’s death will soon be released in the form of IE9
which allegedly isn’t supported by IE8

and sometime in the next year to 18months when YouTube drops support for IE8 and you can no longer view videos…

unless you can make computer evolution stop the only thing to do is roll with it…[/QUOTE]

Ah, but the thing is, they drop support for one reason, and one reason alone. Money. Take for example, the fact probably many XP users now find their IE 6 has been dropped from support from sights like YouTube, this will have most likely angered people as essentially, it forces people to upgrade to a different browser.

The counter question is, why should I? Why should I upgrade browsers / software / Operating System if 1) It just works 2) I’m perfectly content with it? I don’t understand how software companies work, why would anybody upgrade things that work?

It’s sort of like scrapping a T-Reg Ford Fiesta for a newer version; if it worked, great, if not, consider getting it again or invest in a newer model. Why would anyone upgrade if, as I said, it just works?

Sounds like I’ve just repeated myself. But, I’m not sure if this is still accurate but 2/3 of computers still use Windows XP, and with the advent of netbooks in our midst, inevitably it’s fudged the figures more towards Windows XP support.

Not bad for an operating system which is nearly a decade old and still supported as though it was first released :wink:


#16

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2542349]The counter question is, why should I? Why should I upgrade browsers / software / Operating System if 1) It just works 2) I’m perfectly content with it? I don’t understand how software companies work, why would anybody upgrade things that work?[/QUOTE]

Because at some point, it won’t work any longer.
Security is supposed to be better in vista & Win7.
Win7 has lots of nifty little features which help productivity (I love pinning favourite directories to explorer on the start bar - I love how W7 lists recent documents for the respective programs pinned to the start menu).

The eye candy is nice … but i guess unnecessary.
The UAC is great - now the pebkacs in the office can know when they’re doing something they shouldn’t be, or at least a program (web browser) is attempting to do something it shouldn’t be … although the regular firefox updates tend to confuse them.

UAC in Vista was a nightmare - you’d be asked 5-6 times to confirm that you want to make changes to the OS/etc. Grrr. … FFS.


#17

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2542349]Ah, but the thing is, they drop support for one reason, and one reason alone. Money. Take for example, the fact probably many XP users now find their IE 6 has been dropped from support from sights like YouTube, this will have most likely angered people as essentially, it forces people to upgrade to a different browser.

The counter question is, why should I? Why should I upgrade browsers / software / Operating System if 1) It just works 2) I’m perfectly content with it? I don’t understand how software companies work, why would anybody upgrade things that work?

It’s sort of like scrapping a T-Reg Ford Fiesta for a newer version; if it worked, great, if not, consider getting it again or invest in a newer model. Why would anyone upgrade if, as I said, it just works?

Sounds like I’ve just repeated myself. But, I’m not sure if this is still accurate but 2/3 of computers still use Windows XP, and with the advent of netbooks in our midst, inevitably it’s fudged the figures more towards Windows XP support.

Not bad for an operating system which is nearly a decade old and still supported as though it was first released ;)[/QUOTE]

WHY they drop the support isn’t relevant to this discussion, the fact that they eventually DO is…

when the computer will no longer perform the intended task because of an OS/Browser/software compatibility it becomes nothing more then a power hungry dust collection machine.

the time when all those XP systems will cease functioning isn’t known precisely… yet… but the fact that they WILL cease to perform their designated tasks is as certain as Newtonian physics.

that is the “Technical reality”

What you are discussing is the “philosophical side”

On that note I’ll run XP on several systems as long as I can, because when XP stops working (for whatever reason) those systems become basically useless, because as a matter of hardware they have no upgrade potential, to Vista let alone Win7…

Any system that cannot run Vista-buisness is being phased out, not that I’m actually installing vista-biz on those systems… yet…, I ccurrently have no intention of doing so… but I’m preparing for the very certain future.

But I completely agree about XP, it works.

But all the best wishes for it’s long survival? wasted…

AD


#18

XP works indeed!..we have two XP desktops and a cheapo acer lappy with Vista, which btw, also works a treat…:wink:
I will [I]consider[/I] the Win 7 family pack on my next PC build(s)…
However, till then I’ll be rockin& rollin with XP…:slight_smile:


#19

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2542302]A better marketing campaign would be to simply SLASH the prices by a third rather than bundling three licenses together.

Seriously, what the hell were they thinking; many people don’t have three two computers in their homes let alone a third! How will this benefit them!?

Doesn’t say it can’t be used else where outside of the family home ;)[/QUOTE]

A number of households have multiple computers. One for the husband, One for the wife, one for the children, and in a lot of cases a laptop or two. I would certainly be interested in a 3 license package as I have several computers in my household. I feel quite sure that Microsoft has been collecting data as to how many times a single license has been registered to different computers and found that three is the magic number.


#20

Be aware that MS XP-mode will not run on HP - you need 7Pro or better to be backward compatible to XP. If you are VM literate you can install a 3rd party VM/XP to accomplish compatibility.

just in case you got older software that does not like 7