Microsoft makes it easier to perform clean install of Windows 10

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft makes it easier to perform clean install of Windows 10[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/07/myce-windows-10-here-95x75.png[/newsimage]

To make it easier for Windows 10 users to perform a clean installation of the OS, Microsoft today released a new tool called the ‘Refresh Windows Tool’. Microsoft announced the new tool together with the release of a new Windows 10 Insider Preview version.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-makes-easier-perform-clean-install-windows-10-79717/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-makes-easier-perform-clean-install-windows-10-79717/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Hmm, you have that option as part of problem solving once Windows 10 is installed anyway and so I fail to see the news here :confused:


#3

what a shame it isn’t doing something to stop taking control of customers machines and what is installed. a friend of mine just updated his windows 10 and found that his legitimate office 2003 had been uninstalled and office 360 had been installed in it’s place! when contacting Microsft, he was told by their representative that not only could this not happen but that office 2003 wouldn’t work on Windows 10. very strange answer that, seeing as how he has been using it since buying the machine about 3 months ago!!

seems to me more like another example of Microsoft taking over and doing what it wants and not what it’s supposed to do. makes me suspect that the whole reason of Windows 10 is to be able to stop customers doing and using what they want on their own computers!

all the surveillance and spying tactics employed in this version of Windows is probably done at the behest of the NSA or similar security force so it can then use all the data that is being collected on customers, because Congress has wound in what can be done and what cant by those forces. why do you think it is that the UK is falling over itself to implement new laws that allow constant surveillance and hoovering up of everyone’s data from everywhere, not just the UK? all to please the USA and screw their own people!!


#4

While the picture is somewhat more detailed on the subject, like Windows 10 being more of an ad to draw attention to the Microsoft Store thus making money for them, we can still say no by refusing to buy from it and thus ban the use of universal apps. This is M$ nod and envy towards the Apple and Android stores as Microsoft would rather get a cut on every sale done, more so than like it has been where they get none.

As far as uninstalling programs, I have found quite a few that really does not need to be uninstalled, like forefront security which is 100% compatible, all the way to what they want to get rid of but still works unless Windows knows it is installed. I do think, since 2003 is out of support, it may develop issues, but by turning off various stuff like compatibility assistant and other stuff, most of it should continue to work (maybe apart from Outlook, I would not know).
In this case, being a Microsoft program, they are somewhat cornered as most customers would come whining that this and that does not work anymore no matter the life-cycle and so I can understand why they choose to uninstall it. What even I can not understand is how Office 365 got installed as that should be a choice to make for the user by selecting a ‘Office’ start menu choice with a new icon at best, not getting installed as part of the upgrade.

For you to be able to reinstall and keep your old installs, I would start with turning off the Compatibility Assistant as per this thread, but before you start please make a backup :flower:

Now, as far a telemetry collection goes, unless you want it dead silent at the network card (update checks, error reporting etc.) O&O ShutUp10 will let you regain control and so the picture is not entirely black and white.
With that said, I think they collect way too much ‘out of the box’ and so I agree to parts of your post.


#5

[QUOTE=kevpc;2776432]…

seems to me more like another example of Microsoft taking over and doing what it wants and not what it’s supposed to do. makes me suspect that the whole reason of Windows 10 is to be able to stop customers doing and using what they want on their own computers!

all the surveillance and spying tactics employed in this version …!![/QUOTE]

most people just don’t fully understand what ‘Windows as a Service’ means - the implications are much deeper than expected.

In simple words - just consider yourself being a Windoze X Guest using the service as a user without any rights to whatever you create (files). It’s all property of Microsoft hence they can do whatever they want with your creations (read files).


#6

Ignoring Microsoft spying on you and removing your programs without your permission, this reinstallation tool seems like it could be useful. After all, if you use your computer long enough, you’ll find that something eventually happens, forcing you to reinstall your operating system.

I wish Microsoft had made a tool like this with Windows Vista. Every version of Windows from 1.x up to XP has been reasonably easy to reinstall. However, with Vista and 7, it’s basically been a huge PITA to at least keep your old files, unless you have a lot of disk space and patience, in which case the OS will make redundant copies. Of course, that’s just assuming you have an actual reinstallation disc; if you’re reinstalling with an OEM recovery disc will have no choice but to wipe your entire hard drive, even if the issue is something as simple as one or two corrupt files, or a bad registry entry. You can’t even make copies of your files from the recovery disc unless you’re willing to (figure out how to) do so from the command line.:Z

I haven’t used anything from Windows 8 up, but I assume the above complaints still apply. Why repairing the OS requires you to loose all of your spreadsheets (or whatever you have on your computer) is beyond me.

At least with Ubuntu (and I assume other GNU/Linux distros), your personal files are left alone, and your apps can usually be automatically reinstalled with tools like aptik.

Using tools like aptik takes a certain amount of knowhow of course, but at least it’s better than spending two or three hours installing the OS, plus a few days installing updates, followed by manually installing your apps one by one, and finally updating your apps one by one. To make matters worse, if you don’t know what kind of hardware you have, you’ll never be able to track down the drivers you need.:sad:


#7

I’ve found WIndows 10 works ok for the most part.  It wasn’t overly hard to do a clean install last year either.  The only problem I ran into was that my first attempt the network driver didn’t get installed so my copy of win10 didn’t get properly registered, so I couldn’t license my clean install.  Had to reinstall win7, redo the upgrade, install the network driver, and then I was good for the clean install once win10 was registered.

I’m not sure they spying thing makes much a difference now.  They installed the same crap into windows 7 too via monthly updates.   To avoid it in Win7 you have to be meticulous and avoid those updates.  Not much different in Win10 where there’s a method you can disable telemetry.

I agree that win10 removing software during an upgrade is really annoying.   It’s weird because you can reinstall the software after.  The worst was last fall’s major win10 upgrade, basically installing the win10 upgrade like it was a new OS and uninstalling programs that worked.   Why would it need to uninstall programs that were already working under win10?  I agree that the uninstall programs thing should be user warned/prompted. Unilaterally uninstalling things isn’t cool.


#8

@TSJnachos,

Regarding reinstalling drivers, if you’re unsure of where to download all your drivers, there is an app called “Snappy Drivers Installer” with a huge driver database. The initial database is something like 10GB as it covers a vast amount of hardware and Windows OS’s. This app will automatically determine which drivers are required for your system and install them accordingly. The driver database is updated regularly and it can be set to only download driver packs relevant to your hardware.


#9

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2777392]@TSJnachos,

Regarding reinstalling drivers, if you’re unsure of where to download all your drivers, there is an app called “Snappy Drivers Installer” with a huge driver database. The initial database is something like 10GB as it covers a vast amount of hardware and Windows OS’s. This app will automatically determine which drivers are required for your system and install them accordingly. The driver database is updated regularly and it can be set to only download driver packs relevant to your hardware.[/QUOTE]
There’s a safer place - go directly to the manufacture driver support page. Using unverified driver sites are akin to installing malware. You have no real way to verify those are authentic drivers without unknown program hitched with those drivers. Example HP laptop drivers just go to a hp driver page and get the matching drivers. It not that hard to do one just needs to make the right effort to get the right drivers.