Microsoft joins Linux Foundation!

vbimport

#1

No, you didn’t read that title wrong! The Redmond giant has recently joined the Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member. This means that Microsoft will be donating US $500,000 to the Linux Foundation annually. Microsoft will also have a vote in the election of the Linux Foundation’s board of directors.

Microsoft Cloud and Enterprise Executive Vice President Scott Guthrie announced during Microsoft’s annual Connect(); developer event that “We want to help developers achieve more and capitalize on the industry’s shift toward cloud-first and mobile-first experiences using the tools and platforms of their choice. By collaborating with the community to provide open, flexible and intelligent tools and cloud services, we’re helping every developer deliver unprecedented levels of innovation.”

Microsoft writes on its news site: “As part of its effort to work more closely with the open source community, Microsoft on Wednesday announced it has joined the Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member. Microsoft’s membership in the Linux Foundation will benefit customers through increased collaboration and innovation among a diverse ecosystem.”

In that same news article, Microsoft has also announced a Macintosh OS X port of Visual Studio, a public preview of their SQL Server for GNU/Linux, and a preview of Azure App Service for GNU/Linux, with support for containers (I’m not going to pretend to know what “containers” are).

In an OMG!Ubuntu! article, writer Joey-Elijah Sneddon hinted at the possibility of Microsoft joining the Linux Foundation for not-so-noble purposes, though he did so in a dismissive fashion, without going into details about what Microsoft might have planned. He also mentioned the likely hood of the phrase “embrace, extend and extinguish” being recited by not-so-trusting individuals.

In my opinion, the phrase “Embrace, extend and extinguish” seems like a good representation of an all-too-likely motivation for a not-so-good company like Microsoft. Honestly, I wouldn’t be surprised if they tried to extend their controversial telemetry services to GNU/Linux systems, just to say "Linux is spyware. Use Windows.’

On the other hand, Microsoft has contributed to the open source software community in the past. Sneddon described Microsoft as “a leading contributor on Github”, adding that Microsoft had previously “bought, and subsequently open-sourced, Xamarin”. Microsoft has also open-sourced some (or maybe all, I’m not sure) of their .Net platform, allowing .Net apps to be created and used within the open source community. On top of which, they recently introduced a new Windows 10 subsystem, which allows users to run Ubuntu apps using source code derived from Ubuntu 14.04 “Trusty Tahr” itself.

Ultimately, whether or not Microsoft intends to do the Free Software and Open Source Software communities more good than bad remains to be seen.

PS: Microsoft now allows you to update Ubuntu’s codebase to 16.04 Xenial Xerus on Windows 10, starting with build 14936. You can upgrade an existing instance using the same do-release-upgrade command that is used to upgrade non-Windows Ubuntu systems. When creating new Windows/Ubuntu instances, 16.04 will be used by default. Apparently, this has been the case since October, so I guess this won’t come as news to some of you.


#2

I was aware of this, but I do share the doubt and skeptic view of the Linux community on the subject. Here’s hoping :flower:

Thanks for the link to Wikipedia on the subject of ‘embrace, extend and extinguish’ :slight_smile:


#3

Why on earth would Microsoft want to get involved with the Linux Foundation?

Actually there are many good reasons. Some products, especially in the age of the ‘internet of things’, would be better off running Linux rather than embedded Windows. And any developments which made working in a mixed Linux-Windows environment easier would be highly desirable. They might even be willing to donate some of their own code.

But considering Microsoft’s history, and the current practices of its rivals, you can’t overlook the obvious…

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2784047]Microsoft will also have a vote in the election of the Linux Foundation’s board of directors.[/QUOTE]


#4

[QUOTE=Xercus;2784065]I was aware of this, but I do share the doubt and skeptic view of the Linux community on the subject. Here’s hoping :flower:

Thanks for the link to Wikipedia on the subject of ‘embrace, extend and extinguish’ :)[/QUOTE]

Your welcome, but it was Joey-Elijah Sneddon on OMG!Ubuntu! who brought it up. I merely did a web search to see what he was talking about, and then I posted the link. So… thank you Joey-Elijah Sneddon, I guess.[QUOTE=Ibex;2784081]But considering Microsoft’s history, and the current practices of its rivals, you can’t overlook the obvious…“Microsoft will also have a vote in the election of the Linux Foundation’s board of directors.”[/QUOTE]My thoughts, exactly. $500,000 a year is a small price to pay for getting rid of one of your most serious rivals. Of course, there’s no proof Microsoft is planning that, but there’s no proof Microsoft [I]isn’t[/I] planning that either.


#5

Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer.


#6

This is quite amusing.
The only question remains is the name of the OS that MS may develop from this.
Winux or Lindows? :slight_smile:


#7

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Corp._v._Lindows.com,_Inc.

[QUOTE=Dee;2784124]This is quite amusing.
The only question remains is the name of the OS that MS may develop from this.
Winux or Lindows? :)[/QUOTE]


#8

[QUOTE=Dee;2784124]This is quite amusing.
The only question remains is the name of the OS that MS may develop from this.
Winux or Lindows? :)[/QUOTE]
I remember Lindows. Microsoft sued them for trademark infringement, then offered to settle. The Lindows trademark was transferred to Microsoft, but it paid them $20,000,000. :confused:

Why? There was a serious danger of the court ruling that windows was a generic term (it was in common usage before MS released Windows) and removing its trademark status.

Remember: “[I]To the axeman, all supplicants are the same height[/I].” :iagree:


#9

[QUOTE=Dee;2784124]This is quite amusing.
The only question remains is the name of the OS that MS may develop from this.
Winux or Lindows? :)[/QUOTE]FYI, the Linux kernel and the GNU operating system* are licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License. Therefore, they cannot be combined with Windows, as doing so would violate the GPL (unless Microsoft frees/open-sources Windows).

*Forgive me if you’ve heard this from be before, but Linux isn’t an operating system. Rather, it’s a super-butt-kicking system kernel. However, it is often combined with the GNU operating system (which lacks a stable non-Linux kernel) to form a complete operating system. The Free Software Foundation, who has always been the primary force behind GNU development, prefers this combination to be called “GNU/Linux” or “GNU + Linux”, partially to give the GNU devs the credit they deserve and partially to avoid confusion when talking about Linux (“are you talking about the [GNU/]Linux OS, or the Linux kernel?”).