Microsoft is working on rental based DRM software for music

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Microsoft is working on rental based DRM software for music.

 Microsoft is working on a rental based DRM system for its WMA codec codenamed  Janus.  Janus adds a clock function  to WMA capable portable players to allow the playback of rented music,...
Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/8096-Microsoft-is-working-on-rental-based-DRM-software-for-music.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/8096-Microsoft-is-working-on-rental-based-DRM-software-for-music.html)

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#2

No Thanks (that was the polite two-word answer). Apart from WMA being garbage from an audio perspective, I’d say you’d have to be a couple bricks shy of a load or posessed of more money than brains to RENT music. Think of it: you’ve rented it for 20 plays and five weeks after it has expired you want to hear it again - now you have to line their coffers again for the pleasure. I’m sorry but in the consumer arena only a fool will support DRM - the customer is ALWAYS right and if enough people make their displeasure known, this nonsense will end up in the bit-bucket where it belongs, along with all the other RIAA-sponsored initiatives (don’t kid yourself - MS is deeply in bed with the RIAA and MPAA on protectionist copyright initiatives - because given their content it suits them to be). Now, before the pro-MS folks come swarming out of the woodwork with pitchforks and torches, let me be quite clear about something: I’m pro-MS. However I will never ever under any circumstances whatsoever support an initiative that so blatantly and willfully victimizes consumers, provides limited value for their money and strips them of their right to do with their purchases as they see fit. The good thing is that even if this insipid attempt at fleecing consumers somehow does manage to see the light of day, people like “Jon” will be sure to put it in its proper place.


#3

I think this was invented by Hugh Janus. Which is what you will have after you are bent over and receive this new style of music a few times. :r
[edited by Crabbyappleton on 07.04.2004 05:50]


#4

Digital Retard Management will be cracked with everything and everything its released for. Companies should save their money and put it towards improving software so we actually feel like going out there any buying it. I donate to software companies when they ask for donations buy don’t restrict their apps if you don’t. It’s a known fact that if somebody is doing you a favour, you feel like returning it!


#5

I believe Discman is right, this DRM can be and will be cracked. In reality, I can’t see this really taking off at the consumer level. However, for broadcasters, this might actually be a good tool. Aftterall, most hits are played so often that after a month, the listeners have had enough of the song (:g), so giving broadcasters month long rentals would probably work out great for them. For the general consumers, though, this service may work, if they set it up sort of like webcasting, in that you rent so many hours of songs of your choosing, it is D/L’d to your computer and you can listen through your 'puter (in random order) while you work for a month, rather than the online webcasters which companies frown on using because they eat up bandwidth. At the end of the month, you pick out another bunch of songs to listen to and so on. Just a thought.


#6

Hugh Janus :B man thats funny. Thats what you get when you deal with MS and Riaa.


#7

I think rentals would work well for modern music as I cannot see consumers going after the same song once it has left the charts: For example, it is quite common to find people that love the 80s (including myself). I don’t mind purchasing CDs from those years and I have no problem finding others that love listening to music from the 80s. However, I do not see many people popping on those once ‘Top-chart-singles’ from the last few years let alone thinking of getting any music that has now left the charts. If I were to ask anyone if they love listening to music from two years ago, it would be like asking one if they would be willing to go back to using ‘out-of-fashion’ mobile phones from that year :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

Fear not. many people including myself refused to buy any products that contain copy-protection or DRM. Just gotta try to get more people to see the light everyday.