Microsoft bets on subscriptions, pricing for Office 2013 and 365 announced

vbimport

#1

Microsoft bets on subscriptions, pricing for Office 2013 and 365 announced.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2012/09/m2YhXF.png[/newsimage]Microsoft has announced prices of its upcoming Office releases, Office 2013 and Office 365. 


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-bets-on-subscriptions-pricing-for-office-2013-and-365-announced-63845/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-bets-on-subscriptions-pricing-for-office-2013-and-365-announced-63845/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Let’s see, $100.00 every year for Office 365 which gives me no real control, or guaranteed access, of my files because they’re stored on a server farm (the “cloud”) possibly in some 3rd-World country; or a 1-time charge of $140.00 for Office 2013 that I can use for as many years as I want before upgrading again, and which gives me full control and access to my files because they’re on the hard drive of my computer. I’ll take Office 2013 thank you very much. I’ll never understand the whole “cloud” culture. What do people do if they need access to a file, but (1) their internet access goes down, (2) the “cloud” provider’s servers go down, or (3) the “cloud” provider is hit with a denial of service attack and their site goes down?


#3

Running and storing Private and Confidential information on the Cloud?
I’m curious to see how many Morons are stupid enough to actually use this.
Mops must be in short supply at the CIA and FBI due soley to the uncontrolable salivating.


#4

I just hope Larry, Moe and Curly can come back and be administrators for the Dewey, Cheetum & Howe Cloud Investigation Services.


#5

OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice are better bargains.


#6

[QUOTE=RTV71;2655226]OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice are better bargains.[/QUOTE] Openoffice nor libreoffice are as good as MS Office. They are good alternatives if you cannot afford MS Office, otherwise I would just stick with MS Office.


#7

[QUOTE=CharmedonWB;2655274]Openoffice nor libreoffice are as good as MS Office. They are good alternatives if you cannot afford MS Office, otherwise I would just stick with MS Office.[/QUOTE]
Define “good”.

I’ve rarely encountered anyone who uses more than 5% of the capabilities of a modern word processor (whitespace formatting is the industry norm and Notepad can handle that). I gave up trying to explain what “styles” are for.

Once in a great while I’ll encounter a spreadsheet user that knows what they are doing (actually has a cell with a formula in it), usually in engineering or finance.

Presentations are an excuse for bad dialog (search for “Death by PowerPoint” for examples).

Access is an adequate DB IDE but the built-in engine (Jet, or whatever they call it now) is unreliable garbage, especially with multi-user DBs (SQL Server is substantially better) but I’ve only seen it used in larger business environments. Most small businesses use fixed-function applications specific to their industry or use a web-based online service. I’ve never seen a home user create a DB that wasn’t related to a college class they were taking.


#8

[QUOTE=RTV71;2655289]Define “good”.

I’ve rarely encountered anyone who uses more than 5% of the capabilities of a modern word processor (whitespace formatting is the industry norm and Notepad can handle that). I gave up trying to explain what “styles” are for.

Once in a great while I’ll encounter a spreadsheet user that knows what they are doing (actually has a cell with a formula in it), usually in engineering or finance.

Presentations are an excuse for bad dialog (search for “Death by PowerPoint” for examples).

Access is an adequate DB IDE but the built-in engine (Jet, or whatever they call it now) is unreliable garbage, especially with multi-user DBs (SQL Server is substantially better) but I’ve only seen it used in larger business environments. Most small businesses use fixed-function applications specific to their industry or use a web-based online service. I’ve never seen a home user create a DB that wasn’t related to a college class they were taking.[/QUOTE]

Fair point but he might be someone who works in finance or engineering and requires the more advanced features that MS Office provides.
Open Office does not provide an email client like Outlook. Many home users could get away with using Open Office, the enterprise cannot rely on this.


#9

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2655291]Fair point but he might be someone who works in finance or engineering and requires the more advanced features that MS Office provides.
Open Office does not provide an email client like Outlook. Many home users could get away with using Open Office, the enterprise cannot rely on this.[/QUOTE]
That’s why I said “Define Good”.

Most home and small business users have switched to web-based Email many years ago. I’m currently using Office 365 with one business customer but only for their internal emails. Their needs could just as easily be met with any web mail system with a calendar.

Spending money on a office suite is a waste of money for most people. With the shift to mobile systems it’s a dying market. You can expect that in the future anyone still using proprietary office suites will be paying more for less features because in a shrinking market the development costs will be spread over a smaller user base.

For those worried about cloud security, just use an on-line storage service and encrypt your files. You can set up a VPN on your home system and have your own “cloud”.


#10

[QUOTE=BradWright;2655201]Let’s see, $100.00 every year for Office 365 which gives me no real control, or guaranteed access, of my files because they’re stored on a server farm (the “cloud”) possibly in some 3rd-World country; or a 1-time charge of $140.00 for Office 2013 that I can use for as many years as I want before upgrading again, and which gives me full control and access to my files because they’re on the hard drive of my computer. I’ll take Office 2013 thank you very much. I’ll never understand the whole “cloud” culture. What do people do if they need access to a file, but (1) their internet access goes down, (2) the “cloud” provider’s servers go down, or (3) the “cloud” provider is hit with a denial of service attack and their site goes down?[/QUOTE]

Or the users account and access to the cloud is summarily terminated by some automatically perceived infraction with no notice or appeal before their information is simply deleted?

Can’t happen?

It already HAS happened.

Storing everything to the cloud is another way of having ONE COPY of something and we all know what happens to one copy of any data.

AD


#11

Still using Office 97! Bought and Paid for 15 years ago!
It does what I need it to do and as others have stated many things I don’t need it to do. In short it works. At $99.95 amortised over 15 plus years, that’s less than $7 a year for cost. If it works, don’t mess with it.


#12

Bought Office 2010 and will stick with it for the long haul. Going from 97 to 2003 and then to 2007 was a shock and took some re-education to use it and now can’t go back to 2003 or 97 the interfaces are so different and much better revised in 2010 for me that is.


#13

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