Microsoft automatically removes Soctuseer malware with rootkit capabilities from 1.2 million PCs

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft automatically removes Soctuseer malware with rootkit capabilities from 1.2 million PCs[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/11/download-1-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Microsoft has automatically removed malicious software that hijacked the browser of internet users and had rootkit capabilities from 1.2 million Windows computers. The malware is called BrowserModifier:Win32/Soctuseer and is be installed when downloading software from third-party websites.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-automatically-removes-soctuseer-malware-rootkit-capabilities-1-2-million-pcs-80867/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-automatically-removes-soctuseer-malware-rootkit-capabilities-1-2-million-pcs-80867/)

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#2

Users never stop surprising me… How is it even possible to simply accept an ‘in your face’ malware like this without doing anything about it unless you’re blind?

Oh well, I’ll probably never get a definitive answer to that :wink:


#3

[QUOTE=Xercus;2783607]Users never stop surprising me… How is it even possible to simply accept an ‘in your face’ malware like this without doing anything about it unless you’re blind?

Oh well, I’ll probably never get a definitive answer to that ;)[/QUOTE]To be fair, “in your face” ads are part of the internet, unless you have an ad blocker (or a carefully-configured host file). I personally feel disappointed about the widespread use of pop-up ads. Pretty much every major web browser has come with built-in pop-up blockers since the last decade, which shows how unpopular they’ve become. And yet, pop-ups are still a thing.

On top of which, many ads use a boatload of bandwidth, RAM and CPU, which disproportionately affects low-income users who can’t afford fast internet or fast devices. On top of which, modern web ads are malware. The industry may try to deny it, but that’s the cold hard truth.

In other words, the ads from this malware aren’t necessarily a whole lot worse than the ads these users subjected to anyway.


#4

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2783772]To be fair, “in your face” ads are part of the internet, unless you have an ad blocker (or a carefully-configured host file). I personally feel disappointed about the widespread use of pop-up ads. Pretty much every major web browser has come with built-in pop-up blockers since the last decade, which shows how unpopular they’ve become. And yet, pop-ups are still a thing.

On top of which, many ads use a boatload of bandwidth, RAM and CPU, which disproportionately affects low-income users who can’t afford fast internet or fast devices. On top of which, modern web ads are malware. The industry may try to deny it, but that’s the cold hard truth.

In other words, the ads from this malware aren’t necessarily a whole lot worse than the ads these users subjected to anyway.[/QUOTE]

True as stated :flower:
I have a surfing habit (probably most others), which means there are sites I visit on a regular basis like here on MyCE. All of them are visually a little different.
Imo, it is not so much about the widespread use of ‘in-your-face’ popups, more about recognizing a sudden change for them all. What are the chances all of my regular sites starts to experience an identical behavior at the same time? There is in reality only one common factor, my computer.

Still, I know people don’t think in such terms and it is a generally problematic issue as they seem to simply accept it as the ‘new’ way it is.
In my mind, identical behavior across the board for otherwise not linked sites would both raise a red flag and set off quite a few alarm bells in my head :wink: