Methylene Chloride for disk repair?

vbimport

#1

I’m going to try and make some custom drive bays from lexan, and found that Methylene Chloride melts polycarbonate and can be used to glue/weld 2 pieces together. So I was kind of wondering, what if you wiped the surface of a scratched disk with it? Would it melt the scratches out? Would it warp the disk? Would it penetrate through the polycarbonate and damage the recording surface? If a lint free cloth was just barely damped with it, could scratches be buffed/rubbed out?

On a side note, does anyone know how much lexan shrinks at the seam when when welded with Methylene Chloride? I was thinking of dissolving some bits of lexan in it to make a glue.


#2

Hi [B]ripit[/B]: I’m certain that any sort of wiping with methylene chloride would make permanent melted smears on the disc surface that would make things worse. It’s a powerful solvent, that has effects that are difficult to control and I’m sure would penetrate beneath the surface of the disc.

Also it’s a serious toxin and pretty hazardous to use close up.


#3

You must make the fit a full contact fit or it will not bond worth a darn… I have used MC and plexi/lexan in several handsoff jigs for printing with great success , but the fit has to be perfect and square… you will need to gusset the corners though, or you may run into instablity in keeping it square :slight_smile:
I dunno if you can thicken it as you suggested as I just went to a thicker viscosity Cyanoacrylate ( an industrial crazy glue) and it did as good or better but is also more expensive…

And as imkidd says it is very aggressive and toxic but it flashes off fast … I would give it a go just because :slight_smile: just make sure it is a disc you are not that fond of :wink: LOL

Would be very interested in the results :slight_smile:

Cheers


#4

[quote=imkidd57;2144131]Hi [B]ripit[/B]: I’m certain that any sort of wiping with methylene chloride would make permanent melted smears on the disc surface that would make things worse. It’s a powerful solvent, that has effects that are difficult to control and I’m sure would penetrate beneath the surface of the disc.

Also it’s a serious toxin and pretty hazardous to use close up.[/quote]
:eek: Wouldn’t it also effect the write strategy that is embedded on the disc :confused:


#5

It should only cut the surface of the polycarbonate… and not effect anything in the info set, otherwise scratches would do that by themselves. My concerns would be leeching into the edges and thus could delaminate it …

Oh and I would use a wet cloth … a dryer one will leave marks … we used to do that when a print went wrong, but ya get one chance LOL and let it dry completely …


#6

Thanks for the tips on using it to glue pieces together. I was kind of thinking about heat bending some small pieces for reinforcement. Maybe something like this.

Fyi, on the disk repair, I was thinking about a last effort to recover data type thing. There have been several threads about polishing a disk to recover important data or restore a movie that hasn’t been backed up. Sooner or later everyone gets a disk (movie, software or personal data), where there is no backup, and the disk wont read. I was thinking along the lines of if all else fails, melt the surface, and immediately make a new copy. I didn’t think about it getting into the edge and causing delamination. I have heard its pretty nasty when a disk explodes in a drive. Seeing that they spin at 25,000rpm at 16x speed, maybe it would be good to use a drive that has been set to read at slower speeds (like they do to quiet a drive in an htpc).



#8

If you can get a true 90 bend on it I would go for it … if not you may try 45 deg gussets something like this

Just overlap at the top as in diagram, then all you need to do it set your saw to a 45 and rip however many strips you need and it should be all good …Heck you could even just cut square strips to do the same thing … depends on how fussy you are about the asthetics :slight_smile:



#9

Thanks, I’ll see what I can manages when I start building a prototype.