Macrovision VHS -> DVD

I’ve got several dozen VHS tapes that I’ve created myself with a camcorder (they were about the size of a piece of carry-on luggage back then) and several purchased VHS tapes that I want to transfer to DVD. Besides the fact that I need to remove the VHS player from my entertainment center to make room for a Blu-Ray player, we all know that VHS tapes degrade with time and aren’t really meant to last more than 15 years. Some of these tapes are 22 years old. All the store-bought tapes are long since out of print and not available on DVD.

Well, I’m having no problems copying the personally-made tapes. Some of the store-bought tapes will not copy. I’ve got a Toshiba DVD/VHS recorder that will duplicate in either direction. I press dup and it runs for a minute then pops up an error, saying “This program is not allowed to be copied.” The particular tapes I’m having trouble with say “Macrovision” on them. I recognize that as one of the copy protection schemes from way back.

I’ve got several DVD recorders in several computers, one standalone DVD recorder by Philips (which I haven’t tried… maybe I should), and at least three VHS recorders. I’ve also got a video processor somewhere which I used to use for editing tapes… it has a fade (audio and video), a sharpener, and something called a “stabilizer” which would eliminate roll on weak video signals. Would any of that help?

I have no intention of selling the VHS tape or the DVD… I’m just making a copy of a legally purchased tape for my own use. So, is there a way to bypass this copy protection?

Thanks.

“stabilizer”

Is the key word here, if it’s the right type you would not need anything else. If not just google vhs stablizer

You can find many topic here where this has been discussed.
I use the dimax grex but there are others.
So just search a bit here at CDF

So are you saying that Macrovision does little more than lower the vertical sync signal and that DVD recorders that honor the Macrovision protection scheme simply won’t record a video with a low vertical sync?

In other words, I would take one of the other VCR’s, put the stabilizer between that and the DVD recorder and then the DVD recorder will happily record it?

[QUOTE=korz;2453865]So are you saying that Macrovision does little more than lower the vertical sync signal and that DVD recorders that honor the Macrovision protection scheme simply won’t record a video with a low vertical sync?

In other words, I would take one of the other VCR’s, put the stabilizer between that and the DVD recorder and then the DVD recorder will happily record it?[/QUOTE]

It works for me :bigsmile: :bigsmile:

@korz;Most of the time it will.You might run into the occasional Commercial VHS that a stabilizer won’t work on.
Just remember just because a hardware says it is a stabilizer doesn’t make it one.
Read some reveiws on the one you select.
You might look at this link:
http://club.cdfreaks.com/f34/copying-vhs-dvd-297854/
What beef barley uses to go from VHS to computer isn’t a stabilizer but works for him.
I use the dimax grex to go from VCR to a standalone DVD recorder.It is a stabilizer.
I have read if you use a SVHS unit it even gives better results but I don’t have one of those .

It’s been a while since I last went from VHS->DVD, but when I did, my Hauppauge 150-PVR capture card, ignored most, if not all macrovision I threw at it…Just another alternative…

[QUOTE=t0nee1;2453946]It’s been a while since I last went from VHS->DVD, but when I did, my Hauppauge 150-PVR capture card, ignored most, if not all macrovision I threw at it…Just another alternative…[/QUOTE]

The Hauppage WinTV PVR 150 is also what I used to use as well… what I did find out was that certain softwares also affected whether the Macrovision was seen or not. Windows Media Center and Sonic MyDVD both picked up the Macro and would not allow the capture, but Hauppages’ own WinTV software copied ‘every’ VHS tape via the PVR 150.

The Hauppauge PVR USB2 is pretty forgiving too, same MPEG chip I believe.