Macrovision previews Hawkeye P2P Anti-piracy at Midem 2005

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Macrovision previews Hawkeye P2P Anti-piracy at Midem 2005.

                                          Macrovision the market  leader in content production and DRM software will be showcasing its  latest Anti-piracy solutions at Midem 2005.  Their...
Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/9782-Macrovision-previews-Hawkeye-P2P-Anti-piracy-at-Midem-2005.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/9782-Macrovision-previews-Hawkeye-P2P-Anti-piracy-at-Midem-2005.html)

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#2

don’t these rich people have anything better to do with there time. even i know you can never stop people from file sharing :S the only time that will happen is when we all make over 100 G’s a year and everything costs 50 cents :slight_smile:


#3

If you really want to stop piracy, stop it at it’s source. The HUGE corporations that rip us off when it comes to our music and our movies. How can something I buy not belong to me, how can something I own, not be mine, how can you tell me what to do with something that I bought with my own money that I earned? You know the US is ever closer to a police state when a judge says that you can now be searched for drugs with no just cause. I thought your constitution protected you from unjust searches and abuse of power. Glad to know that you just lost that right…wonder what will be next. Leave the US while you have a chance and join a real free country. Leave your corrupt corpor…I mean government behind. Since they don’t even trust you to vote for them anyways cause yer all sheep.:B


#4

This is stupid. Even I have revert to sticking my tape recorder at the speaker. I’m going to continue copying my music that I own. As Howie Carr says, “Screw” :d


#5

If ‘Hawkeye’ (GO MASH!) was to share dud files over the internet wouldnt people just blacklist the hash instead? So when you started downloading it you would see other sources clearly stating “Dummy file - do not download!” Yet another idiotic idea to protect the coffers of the MPAA and RIAA. When will they learn the only way to compete with a FREE download over the internet is to LOWER prices on seeing movies and buying music. P2P is an innovation, and innovaion can not be fought for long.


#6

They obviously stole the "hawkeye’ name from the Callaway range of golf clubs.


#7

[I]They obviously stole the "hawkeye’ name from the Callaway range of golf clubs.[/I] Not really. As long as the product classification is different, trademark names can be identical. Should Macrovision in their wisdom, one day decide to make golf clubs called Hawkeye, then they can be sued for trademark infringement. But I’m sure FreqNasty you meant it as a joke. :B
[edited by icepax on 25.01.2005 15:30]


#8

It’s always worth a giggle when I see a 1:1 DVD copy with “Quality Protection by Macrovision” at the end. I suspect the CD protection will work just as well. :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

Since 2002, over 4,000 music albums are using Macrovision’s content protection technology, which accounts for over 400 million music CDs worldwide or over 4 billion songs. Their technology is in use by over 22 major and independent record labels and 20 resellers.
And works fine aint it still all those album are ended up on the internet and the (lame) p2p networks. Only solution is lowering the goddamn prices of the albums and movies. This is also goes for software.


#10

LOL, i get a giggle out of that myself…:d


#11

At present I’m converting all my music collection to MP3s and its taking an eternity. But when I’m finished I will have a number of DVDs with approx 1000 tracks per disc. But if I got my hands on a friends collection and their friends, etc etc, I would have tens of thousands of tracks. The point I’m trying to make is that when a track is converted to mp3 it is then in the public domain and most probably going to be shared. It only takes a track to be ripped once and its out there for all to get. People will always get around protections. :slight_smile:


#12

i think we should all rush down tothe store and pay full price i mean gosh all the hard work the record companies put in does require $100.000.00 plus salaries doesnt it and you villians are breakin the law that the rich and wealthy have put there for you to follow as fodder to their pockets how else would rolls royce m benz and a lot of other car sales be affected if we didnt pay the wonderfull prices that they charge ? oh my god and the jewellery stores with the $10,000,00 watches you people must follow the rules and obey NOW YOU HAVE BEEN TOLD :g


#13

i agree with you frogfart… it’s these dumbass media companies just don’t seem to understand it… all it takes is one 15 year old to bypass this protection and post it on P2P… then game over, and start all over again…


#14

Macrovision is a cancer in the industry. No other company has successfully stolen so many fair use rights and become filthy rich in the process. Interesting that they have a solution that allows online music customers to burned DRMed CDs. If it can be written with a bog standard CD burner, it’s certainly not an effective copy protection mechanism. Then again, Macrovision does not exist to create effective copy protection mechanisms. They exist to sell ineffective copy protection mechanisms to fatheads who think that crippling their products will improve sales. Seriously, DRM itself is the biggest obstacle in the way of online music sales taking off… people want something they can play anywhere, on any device. And they DON’T want something that will magically disappear if they upgrade their computer.