M-DISC worth?

vbimport

#1

Hi everyone. I would like to ask you some help, please. I would like to buy a new blu-ray burner, but here, in my country, there is a few models on sale. There are many people selling the model wh14ns40, some people selling the model BH16NS40 , both from LG, some people selling the model BDR-209-DBK and just one seller with the model BDR-208-DBK ( I tried to find the model EBK, but here they don’t import this kind of burner because of its cost), both of these from Pioneer. I have seen over this forum that Pioneer burners have better quality. However, I noticed that LG burners have more burning options, such as BDXL and M-DISC support. But, after all, I would like to but the best drive I can, because I won’t be able to replace it soon. Is it really worth this M-DISC support? And what about the BDXL media? I’ve read that it’s rare and has a high cost. Do both of them rip well a blu-ray disc? I have read that pioneer drives are a bit worse for this job. If someone knows a discussion or thread with these subjects, please, fell free to write down. Thank you a lot for your help, peaple.


#2

The Pioneer BDR-2209 has BDXL support. link I’m not sure if it has M-Disc BD-R support. There are sellers on Amazon selling it with M-Disc BD-R blanks, so it would seem likely.


#3

BDR-209 (& 208) series supports writing to M-DISC BD-R. Unfortunately they do not seem to support writing to M-DISC DVD media (reading should be supported). As you noted, EBK/MBK/UBK models (unavailable to you) are the models which support BDXL (the 2209 Stereodude mentioned is the equivalent of a 209M). But BDXL media is unlikely to be a big concern.

LG 14x and 16x drives should all support writing to M-DISC DVD-R & BD-R, as well as the (fairly rare & expensive) BDXL media.

Only you can decide if BDXL support or M-DISC support is important. For M-DISC, no one knows how long ‘normal’ media will last, though if you get good BD or DVD media to begin with, it shouldn’t be a problem. BDXL is only important if you want more than 50 GB of storage space on one disc (keep in mind that you’ll be spending 3 or more hours to write one full BDXL disc).

They both seem to have a similar longevity. Keep your expectations realistic in this area, and don’t keep the drive constantly active at high speeds to have a greater chance of a good drive life.

Ripping: people have indeed commented that the LG is a bit faster, but should the Pioneer available to you be cheaper, the decrease in reading speed shouldn’t matter too much for casual reading needs.


#4

If you intend to archive precious home videos and photos and data onto optical discs then IMO M-DISC is the only way to go. The discs are expensive but I have no confidence that dye-based methods are reliable for the very long term.


#5

[QUOTE=DukeOfUrl;2761824]If you intend to archive precious home videos and photos and data onto optical discs then IMO M-DISC is the only way to go. The discs are expensive but I have no confidence that dye-based methods are reliable for the very long term.[/QUOTE]

Conventional HTL BD-R are not dye-based and they are 10x cheaper than M-Disc. (eg Melody 50 spindle $20, M-Disc 15 spindle $70)

The basic concept behind M-Disc was to backport to DVD an inorganic based phase change layer similar to existing HTL BD-R. Fine. But then to release a BD-R version of M-Disc…lol, it’s pretty much an ordinary BD-R without the reflective layer. For me, not worth the 10x price difference.

If you want to spend more than Melody, get some nice Panasonics that are rated for 50 years. They probably could have rated them something dumb like 1000 years if they really wanted. Lets be real, in 1000 years the polycarbonate of M-Disc will be rotted, the adhesive will have failed and the disc will be a pile of mush.


#6

[QUOTE=elgario;2761857]Conventional HTL BD-R are not dye-based and they are 10x cheaper than M-Disc. (eg Melody 50 spindle $20, M-Disc 15 spindle $70)

The basic concept behind M-Disc was to backport to DVD an inorganic based phase change layer similar to existing HTL BD-R. Fine. But then to release a BD-R version of M-Disc…lol, it’s pretty much an ordinary BD-R without the reflective layer. For me, not worth the 10x price difference.

If you want to spend more than Melody, get some nice Panasonics that are rated for 50 years. They probably could have rated them something dumb like 1000 years if they really wanted. Lets be real, in 1000 years the polycarbonate of M-Disc will be rotted, the adhesive will have failed and the disc will be a pile of mush.[/QUOTE]

From my understanding, HTL BD-R are indeed dye based; it’s only the reflectivity schema that changes:

I don’t think that the M-Disc technology actually writes discs the way we’ve thought. They claim that in fact they physically etch the disc with higher powered lasers that leave behind actual depressions in the substrate – no dyes ever involved. And, while we think there’s no reflective layer to these M-Discs, they use the contrast between the physically burned pits and unburned substrate to make these new discs readable in all legacy DVD/BD readers. I find that pretty remarkable.

I agree that the “1,000 years” stuff is all marketing hype, but having switched to Phthalocyanine based DVDs years ago –just for doubling the expected life of my archival disks– every bit of added assurance helps. Cheaper is not always better when it comes to this stuff, and I like to sleep at night. The funny thing is that my Mistsui Phthalocyanine DVD-Rs cost about $0.11/GB, and these M-Disc 25GB ones look like they cost about $0.10/GB, so for me it would be a wash in total archiving costs.

I just ordered an M-Disc burner and some discs. While I don’t have anyway of testing their true archival qualities vs. other common DVD/BD media, I will see what I can find out.


#7

Don’t know why the HTL BD-R URL didn’t appear, but let’s try this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-ray_Disc_recordable#BD-R_LTH_.28low_to_high.29


#8

[QUOTE=r00p;2766058]From my understanding, HTL BD-R are indeed dye based; it’s only the reflectivity schema that changes:
[/quote]
HTL uses inorganic metallic phase change layer.