LP to Digital backup

vbimport

#1

I was wondering if anyone has had experience with LP to CD backup using a USB turntable. I’m considering purchasing one to back up all my vinyl.

I guess my questions are:
Is one brand of turntable any better than another?
Is one software better than another?
Are there pitfalls to this backup method I should be aware of?
And is there a better, simpler or cheaper way to back up vinyl to MP3/ CD than a USB turntable?

Thanks for any help you can offer.

kolohe


#2

If you have a computer close to your turn table you can use output from your amp to input of sound card. Regular RCA to phone jack cable required.
Otherwise USB turn table is OK.
There is not much difference in quality of sound specially if you are converting to MP3.
What software do you have?
I do not know if any of them will capture in MP3, you may have to convert later.
MP3 will not play on regular CD player, unless it support that format.
I think new car players play mp3.


#3

IMHO those USB turntables (with one or two exceptions maybe) are aimed at people who don’t have a clue. If you care about your vinyl, you’ll already have a good turntable and amp/receiver and where you should spend your money instead is on a good soundcard. There’s some very nice external ones, which will easily bridge the distance from your hifi to the PC. But then again, if you care about your vinyl, there’s no need to digitize it either - enjoy its as it was intended. :flower:


#4

[QUOTE=Cressida;2036431]IMHO those USB turntables (with one or two exceptions maybe) are aimed at people who don’t have a clue. If you care about your vinyl, you’ll already have a good turntable and amp/receiver and where you should spend your money instead is on a good soundcard. There’s some very nice external ones, which will easily bridge the distance from your hifi to the PC. But then again, if you care about your vinyl, there’s no need to digitize it either - enjoy its as it was intended. :flower:[/QUOTE]

Ah, one of the few remaing voices of sanity left. Follow Cressida’s advice and don’t waste your money on those POS USB turntables. I have converted hundreds of albums for the purpose of convenience and burning to CDR for auto listening, but for true Vinyl enjoyment listen to it the way it was meant to be.


#5

[QUOTE=pipemanid;2036451]but for true Vinyl enjoyment listen to it the way it was meant to be.[/QUOTE]I don’t believe the artists intended for pops and cracks to be including in their material :disagree:

They were only using what technology they had at the time :rolleyes:

That’s my story and i’m sticking to it :bigsmile:


#6

If you have a good quality old turntable just connect it to the sound card.I haven’t tried with mine but if the turntable out is not enough for the sound card you might have to run it through a receiver/amp then the sound card.I would just put it all on the hard drive or maybe an external hard drive.Then only burn to CD -r if I needed to.
There is software if you want to remove the pops & cracks.Or they say it does anyway.


#7

[QUOTE=Bob;2036462]I don’t believe the artists intended for pops and cracks to be including in their material :disagree:[/QUOTE]

Had you taken care of your albums, like I did, you wouldn’t be listening to pops and clicks…I have albums approaching 50 years old that don’t have a pop or click on them…
Proper storage and cleaning will do wonders for most things and Vinyl in particular… Cheap turntables, worn stylii, improper setup, and and too many parties will take their toll…


#8

Anything to do with vinyl be it virgin or recycled will have static build up no matter what you do.


#9

[QUOTE=Bob;2036476]Anything to do with vinyl be it virgin or recycled will have static build up no matter what you do.[/QUOTE]
Hey Bob (rolling56)… BULLSHIT…
Static dissipation is resolved in the arm and transport mechanism…Get yourself a Zerostat and maintain adequate humidity and static becomes a non-issue…
I’ve been playing Vinyl since you were still learning to ride your bicycle with the training wheels…
Cheap equipment, lousy results…Just like everything else in life…


#10

[QUOTE=pipemanid;2036482]Hey Bob (rolling56)… BULLSHIT…
Static dissipation is resolved in the arm and transport mechanism…Get yourself a Zerostat and maintain adequate humidity and static becomes a non-issue…
I’ve been playing Vinyl since you were still learning to ride your bicycle with the training wheels…
Cheap equipment, lousy results…Just like everything else in life…[/QUOTE]Age is not an issue. This is way off topic and i apologize to the OP :flower:


#11

[QUOTE=cholla;2036468]If you have a good quality old turntable just connect it to the sound card.I haven’t tried with mine but if the turntable out is not enough for the sound card you might have to run it through a receiver/amp then the sound card.[/QUOTE]

Unless your turn table is equipped with a preamp, then you cannot connect it directly since you are missing equalization needed for record reproduction.

For the rest of you guys, no offence, but OP is not asking about Hi Fi opinion, he just want to record his vinyl to a CD into mp3 format, which usualy cut off at 15 kHz.


#12

:bigsmile: Strong minds, strong opinions. Been there, done that, and it’s not what I want (and I’m sure that’s many other people’s experience too). Not even talking on an audiophile level here, which I’m not really. Normal LP noise doesn’t take away from the music enjoyment in any way for me (how many times have you heard it added artificially with new material), and in the event I do need a digital copy, I’ll prefer to do zero editing as the other two alternatives don’t appeal to me at all, being: 1. spending hours, days, weeks,… in front of your monitor, painstaikingly removing every imperfection manually, a never perfect job requiring sound engineer skills or 2. surrendering yourself to artificial intelligence and running some clean-up algorithms over your music, only to live with that nagging doubt about what it really took away afterwards. Thanks but no thanks, I’ll have mine straight-up please ;).


#13

Uh, did that years ago.
You need a good tuntable, preferably with preamp, and any good software like wavelab & cooledit should be okay with it.


#14

[QUOTE=CDuncle;2036498]Unless your turn table is equipped with a preamp, then you cannot connect it directly since you are missing equalization needed for record reproduction.
QUOTE]

I should have put it that way.
Mine is a good turntable but doesn’t have a preamp so it would need to use some equipment a receiver/amp for example to amp the phono input before the sound card.
My turntable is a Pioneer PL - 518 & spends most of it’s time in its original box.I rarely play any vinyl.


#15

[QUOTE=cholla;2036838][QUOTE=CDuncle;2036498]Unless your turn table is equipped with a preamp, then you cannot connect it directly since you are missing equalization needed for record reproduction.
QUOTE]

I should have put it that way.
Mine is a good turntable but doesn’t have a preamp so it would need to use some equipment a receiver/amp for example to amp the phono input before the sound card.
My turntable is a Pioneer PL - 518 & spends most of it’s time in its original box.I rarely play any vinyl.[/QUOTE]

You need equalizer because this is the way records are produced, more here.

You need preamp, because needle produces very low curent and regular sound card input will load it to the point where you get nothing out of the needle.
You do not have to worry about all this, because all receivers or amps have phono input, so just plug your turntable in and one of the receiver/amp outputs to your sound card and the way you go.


#16

Just my $.02, Audacity can apply the RIAA curve if your soundcard can capture Stereo at low (mic) levels. But you are better off to use a preamp and line in on your PC.


#17

Wow! Thanks one and all! I certainly got more feedback than I anticipated. :smiley:

You’ve all convinced me to forget the USB turntable idea. I’d hate to admit I’m totally clueless but lets just say I’m at least in part, techo challenged. I follow directions really well tho. :stuck_out_tongue:

My stereo can be set up next my computer. My system is old and I’m guessing of moderate quality. (Technics Turntable quartz Direct Drive, auto turntable, SL-Q035 with a JVC receiver RX 450 w/ SEA equalizer). I haven’t used the turn table in many years and no doubt a new stylus is in order if they still make them!

My puter is equipped with at Realtek High Def soundcard (I think:p).
The only software I have that I think does this kind of thing is Nero 7 Ultra with the Wave Editor program.

I’m not looking for absolute perfection when backing up to CD, only to have the music available to play in another, more portable format. I might consider looking into the pop and clicks removal software if the LP is in truly bad shape. Alas, some of my vinyl has seen better days. If I knew then what I know now, I’m sure I would have been a bit more careful; though I wasn’t a complete barbarian to my albums. :bigsmile:

That all said I have the following questions:

1: If I understand it correctly, my receiver works as the pre-amp, right?

2: So all I need to do is use an RCA plug equipped cable and go from some (as yet unidentified) output port on the receiver to the input port on my puters sound card. Yes?

3: Is there a specific way to identify the sound card input port or is it fairly obvious?

  1. Then I assume it’s just follow the directions on the software? (I’ll look into the wavelab and cooledit software mentioned as well… thnx)

  2. When you do the back up to your harddrive is it done in wav format? And then you convert it to MP3 using something like WMP when you burn it to CD?

Thanks to everyone … the information was excellent and very helpful. :smiley:


#18

kolohe;I found this tutorial I think it will answer the first 3 questions.
http://personal-computer-tutor.com/abc2/v19/vic19.htm
4. depends on software
5.Again it depends on the program that rips the sound from the phono.I haven’t done this so I’m not sure but I think you could convert to any of several .mp3,.wav etc.


#19

To answer you questions:
1: Yes
2: Yes
3:Each card is little different so you will have to use your manual (if you have one) for sound card to see which port is input.
Sometime just looking at the picture or text next to each connector will give a clue.
4:Nero has pop and click remover if you have other than OEM version.
5: Yes. It come in as a wav, so you have to convert to mp3. Nero can do that also.


#20

cholla thanks for the tutorial link… that’s exactly what I needed… simple to understand with visuals! :slight_smile:

Thanks for all your help!