Lower pifs = more longevity?

Hello all,

Do lower pifs mean more longevity? When using high quality media, what do higher pifs mean in terms of degradation.

Thanks

That’s the general idea, although there’s no way to quantify error levels vs expected lifespan. There’s also plenty of crappy media that scans well after burning only to die in a few months. High quality media with higher error rates is less likely to degrade, so it’s all relative. How the media is stored and handled is also a factor.

Thanks for your reply!

Do additional pifs appear on discs as time goes by?

Yes! I’ve had this happen to me with backups of cheap media given to me :sad:

[QUOTE=rdgrimes]High quality media with higher error rates is less likely to degrade, so it’s all relative. How the media is stored and handled is also a factor.

Due to the experience above, I’ve only bought TY & RICOHJPN for my own use.

I do wonder how good DAXON is in this respect. Rumour has it they burn with quality and use an AZO dye not unlike those of MCC.

:slight_smile:

Do additional pifs appear on discs as time goes by?

We all hope not, but yes they usually do on lesser quality discs, or when exposed to light/heat/moisture.

If you have any, check their make of Dye with DVDinfo pro or similar.

I use a mixture of 8x TY dye & 16x MCC dye - both look good (PIF under 4, total PIF 100 or so)

I’m soooooooo glad to read this! At last I find one of the most experienced members of this board voicing this opinion. Thanks! :slight_smile: - I feel less lonely now. :cool:

Most notable examples in my experience:
TDKG002 - marginal scans to start with (over 200 PIE levels, dozens of 4-5 PIF peaks), but… TOTALLY STABLE.
RITEKG05 - just after the burn wonderful scans good for the hall of fame, but… 6 months later the numbers are in the stratosphere and reading errors start to occur on many discs.

It’s all in the dye. The PIF’s on the disc in a scan are the errors which are on the disc or in reading - now this is related to the laser power of the burner, the laser waveform, the tracking and focus accuracy of the burner that burnt it. The dye, if it is good, should be able to tolerate some deviance in this and keep a pristine recording. The errors can be induced here as the deviances in power cause pit geometry/jitter/reflectivity issues and cause errors. After this burning influence, theres the dye lifetime, sometimes the dye degrades easily in light introducing more errors and this is basically the increases we see in jitter and PIF’s.

You forget humidity, scratches and dirt :wink:

The two last mentioned, BTW, having a huge impact on PIFs if they’re present on the blank. Even the very tiny scratches (if radial) and the very tiny speckle of dust. A very clean blank gives much less PIFs than a (even slightly) dusty one.

So no, it’s NOT ‘all in the dye’. :disagree:

  1. The polycarbonate bottom layer’s optical quality is important for the burn quality, and its resistance to scratching plays an important part in the degradation process.

  2. The quality of the manufacturing, notably bonding, gives the media more or less resistance to humidity. Also the mechanical resistance of the disc will impact on its ability to withstand physical stress.

  3. Impurities introduced during the manufacturing process will make the dye less stable.

LOl - i have a nasty habit of overgeneralising

  • dust and scratches before the burn always have a major impact - they shadow a whole large area from the laser - but after a burn is not as bad

LOL If you know it, then it’s not all that nasty :wink:

but after a burn is not as bad
Dust no, scratches yes… scratches aftre the burn won’t have any impact on the media stability strictly speaking, but will introduce reading problems nevertheless… and even lead to unreadable sectors much more quickly (sadly) than with CDRs… :sad: