Low Memory

vbimport

#1

Ok, guys, every time I think I am getting the hang of working on computers another problem shows me I’m not.

I bought my daughter an HP-G62 laptop and it got to where it was extremely slow, and at times would lock up. I checked the HD with Vivard and it had one bad sector. I checked the RAM with Memtest and after four times there was no errors. I have reloaded the Windows 7 Home Premium x64 and noticed it was still slow but I attributed it to the fact that no updates had been loaded. I was loading updates when I got a message about low memory. The laptop has 3 GB RAM memory. So what is this about low memory. Thanks.


#2

Hard drives can be slow, some monumentally slow. Even with substantial amounts of RAM, this will make for slow loading of applications, saving of files, etc. This is important, as many apps cache files to the hard drive, requiring many small writes, which will impact general performance.

And 3 GB of RAM is low for Windows 7. Just having a browser open along with one or two other apps (like a music player) can use up whatever Windows doesn’t need for itself. I find that even 4 GB is the bare minimum for my use these days.

So, when all the RAM is used, Windows will turn to the hard drive as virtual RAM. That means the OS will kick stuff out of real RAM & write to the hard drive. Depending on how much RAM your apps need, this can result in frequent slowdowns.

And if, for some reason, your hard drive (or other hardware in your system) is slowly becoming unhealthy, things get even slower as error correction kicks in. While 1 reallocated sector isn’t terrible, there may be other things the hard drive is having to compensate for on the fly.

But the front-facing issue is probably just a lack of RAM.


#3

[QUOTE=Albert;2787834]Hard drives can be slow, some monumentally slow. Even with substantial amounts of RAM, this will make for slow loading of applications, saving of files, etc. This is important, as many apps cache files to the hard drive, requiring many small writes, which will impact general performance.

And 3 GB of RAM is low for Windows 7. Just having a browser open along with one or two other apps (like a music player) can use up whatever Windows doesn’t need for itself. I find that even 4 GB is the bare minimum for my use these days.

So, when all the RAM is used, Windows will turn to the hard drive as virtual RAM. That means the OS will kick stuff out of real RAM & write to the hard drive. Depending on how much RAM your apps need, this can result in frequent slowdowns.

And if, for some reason, your hard drive (or other hardware in your system) is slowly becoming unhealthy, things get even slower as error correction kicks in. While 1 reallocated sector isn’t terrible, there may be other things the hard drive is having to compensate for on the fly.

But the front-facing issue is probably just a lack of RAM.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the reply Albert. Not to argue, just information, but the laptop came with 3 GB RAM and Windows 7 Home Premium x64 and worked fine until the last couple of years when it starts slowing down until it finally became almost unusable.

Question: Since the HD has a bad sector could it be failing, which seems to be what you were talking about. And, since my daughter is now a working RN, she bought herself another computer and this one is now mine and I plan to update the RAM. But I would really like to get the computer working before I invest in new RAM.

Also, task manager says that something is using low 80’s to low 90’s percent of the physical memory all the time. Could this be a HD failing. Thanks.


#4

[QUOTE=kemperhils;2787836]Thanks for the reply Albert. Not to argue, just information, but the laptop came with 3 GB RAM and Windows 7 Home Premium x64 and worked fine until the last couple of years when it starts slowing down until it finally became almost unusable.

Question: Since the HD has a bad sector could it be failing, which seems to be what you were talking about. And, since my daughter is now a working RN, she bought herself another computer and this one is now mine and I plan to update the RAM. But I would really like to get the computer working before I invest in new RAM.

Also, task manager says that something is using low 80’s to low 90’s percent of the physical memory all the time. Could this be a HD failing. Thanks.[/QUOTE]

A failing HDD shouldn’t cause that to happen.

In my first screenshot below, this is what my computer looks like a few minutes after boot with a few apps that run at boot. (Haven’t opened anything else). If you would, open Task Manager & take a screenshot of what it looks like for you?

In my second screenshot, you see the list of apps currently using memory. I’ve ordered it by what’s using the most memory at the moment (clicking on the “Working Memory” – shown in the screenshot as “Working …” – button so the apps with the largest values are at the top). IF YOU FEEL COMFORTABLE, can you also do this (including making sure the apps using the most memory are at the top of the list) & post a screenshot?




#5

Also.

I just remembered.

Trying to apply updates, especially on a brand new installation of Windows 7 with no service pack, will result in a LARGE amount of memory being used (Windows is trying to keep tab of what updates need to be applied, and is probably downloading as many as it can all at once).

There may be a thread around here where someone has commented on how to work around that. Lemme see…


#6

[QUOTE=Albert;2787841]A failing HDD shouldn’t cause that to happen.

In my first screenshot below, this is what my computer looks like a few minutes after boot with a few apps that run at boot. (Haven’t opened anything else). If you would, open Task Manager & take a screenshot of what it looks like for you?

In my second screenshot, you see the list of apps currently using memory. I’ve ordered it by what’s using the most memory at the moment (clicking on the “Working Memory” – shown in the screenshot as “Working …” – button so the apps with the largest values are at the top). IF YOU FEEL COMFORTABLE, can you also do this (including making sure the apps using the most memory are at the top of the list) & post a screenshot?[/QUOTE]

I will try, but I can’t get the computer online yet as it takes forever to open IE, then forever to go to a site, etc, etc.

Also, SP1 and IE 11 are installed. One more thing, CPU usage, after boot is low, it is the memory that is almost used up.


#7

Ok, guys, every time I think I am getting the hang of working on computers another problem shows me I’m not.

Every time you solve another problem, it shows you that you are getting the hang of it. I read through the thread a couple of times, when you say reloaded, do you mean a clean install as Albert states in Post #5?

especially on a brand new installation of Windows 7


#8

[QUOTE=kemperhils;2787846]I will try, but I can’t get the computer online yet as it takes forever to open IE, then forever to go to a site, etc, etc.

Also, SP1 and IE 11 are installed. One more thing, CPU usage, after boot is low, it is the memory that is almost used up.[/QUOTE]

Here it is. Couldn’t get the computer online so I had to put the screen shots on a thumb drive to get them to you. The images are not as clear as yours but I had to load them from the thumb drive as attachments. Thanks.


#9

[I]Every time you solve another problem, it shows you that you are getting the hang of it. I read through the thread a couple of times, when you say reloaded, do you mean a clean install as Albert states in Post #5?[/I]

Yes, thanks for the reply.


#10

You’re not working with 3 GB of RAM. You’re working with 762 MB of addressable general-purpose RAM available to applications & the OS. In addition, there’s a GOOD chance the graphics processor is allotted a solid 256 MB of memory at all times (plus other dynamically-allocated RAM from that first 762 MB).

256 MB + 762 MB = 1018 MB.
Just under 1 GB of RAM (1024 MB; the extra few megabytes are probably reserved for system use, which is normal).

If the RAM in the system is a 1 GB + 2 GB configuration, something is preventing the 2 GB (probably a single stick) from working.

It’s on you now to decide if you want to try to swap the RAM sticks around, or maybe see if HP has diagnostic software which will identify any kind of problem.

It may also help to boot into the system’s BIOS or EFI setup screen & check to see if the system detects the full amount of RAM outside of the OS.


#11

[QUOTE=Albert;2787852]You’re not working with 3 GB of RAM. You’re working with 762 MB of addressable general-purpose RAM available to applications & the OS.

There’s a GOOD chance the graphics processor is allotted a solid 256 MB of memory at all times.

256 MB + 762 MB = 1018 MB.
Just under 1 GB of RAM (1024 MB).

If the RAM in the system is a 1 GB stick + a 2 GB stick, something is preventing the 2 GB stick from working.[/QUOTE]

Would you explain to me how to came to the conclusion. Also I have had the RAM out and reinstalled to make sure of a good connection since the computer sat up for a while. Again, since there is only 1 GB of RAM being used could you give me some things to check to see why the 2 GB stick is not being used. Thanks.


#12

I edited my post a little bit, but I’ll elaborate:

You can try the 2 GB stick in the slot where the 1 GB stick currently is. Do not put the 1 GB stick back in alongside it. If the system works, then the 2 GB stick is okay.

If the 2 GB stick is okay, swap it back to the original slot. If the system fails to boot, it’s possible that memory slot no longer works (not uncommon). In that case, it’s advisable to see if the system supports 4 GB RAM sticks so you can have a decent chunk of RAM for use.

If the 2 GB stick does not work when you swap slots, then it is the stick that’s failed, and you will have to replace it. Return the 1 GB stick to its slot & ensure the system hasn’t mysteriously failed.

I am assuming the system makes use of RAM sticks only and doesn’t have any RAM soldered to the motherboard.


#13

Also, if you decide to buy more RAM, you can use Crucial’s tool on that laptop to advise you on the type of RAM + the maximum amount of RAM you could have. http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/systemscanner

Of course, if the tool tells you that you could have 8 GB max by way of 2 x 4 GB sticks & you discover that only one slot’s working, you know you can only have a maximum of 4 GB by way of 1 stick.


#14

[QUOTE=Albert;2787857]Also, if you decide to buy more RAM, you can use Crucial’s tool on that laptop to advise you on the type of RAM + the maximum amount of RAM you could have. http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/systemscanner

Of course, if the tool tells you that you could have 8 GB max by way of 2 x 4 GB sticks & you discover that only one slots, you know you can only have a maximum of 4 GB by way of 1 stick.[/QUOTE]

Now I really feel like an idiot. As many times as I have checked RAM in desktops as you described, but alas, overlook a step, get frustrated and, well you get the idea.

Ok, Albert, the computer will boot on the 1 GB stick in the bottom RAM, which I am assuming is slot 1, but won’t on the 2 GB stick. So the 2 GB stick is bad. But one more question, if you will. When I ran Memtest it recognized the 2 GB stick and the 1 GB stick. Since it recognized the 2 GB stick wasn’t it testing the 2 GB stick when after four passes it showed no errors. Thanks for you help. I will order some RAM.


#15

If it was truly detecting the 2 GB stick, maybe the RAM hadn’t completely failed at that moment. MAYBE. I cannot be sure.


#16

[QUOTE=Albert;2787860]If it was truly detecting the 2 GB stick, maybe the RAM hadn’t completely failed at that moment. MAYBE. I cannot be sure.[/QUOTE]

Ok, thanks for the help. Have ordered 2x2 GB ram from Crucial. And I figured out how you knew only the 1 GB stick was working. That information is at the bottom of the performance tab. Never noticed that little bit of info before. Thanks again.


#17

[QUOTE=kemperhils;2787861]Ok, thanks for the help. Have ordered 2x2 GB ram from Crucial. And I figured out how you knew only the 1 GB stick was working. That information is at the bottom of the performance tab. Never noticed that little bit of info before. Thanks again.[/QUOTE]

One last note on this thread. This is the computer I was having trouble with. Installed new RAM, works great. Thanks again guys


#18

Glad to hear it. :slight_smile:


#19

:clap::clap:It has to be said, great job Albert.:clap::clap:


#20

[QUOTE=beef barley;2787921]:clap::clap:It has to be said, great job Albert.:clap::clap:[/QUOTE]

Yes it was. Thanks again.:bow: