Lossy audio compression

I have always used lossless compression, but I’m a bit tempted by the size of lossy compression. I like to rip multiple CDs and burn the tracks onto DVDs so they are easier to play. But using lossy compression can put a lot more CDs onto the DVD than with lossless compression.

So my question is, at what levels of lossy compression can the difference be inaudible? Like the bitrate and the codec, which codec is the best for producing inaudible differences at the lowest bitrate etc… Is there such a thing where lossy compression can be truly indistinguishable from lossless?

I use the Microsoft Windows and only play music on my computer, so compatibility of WMA isn’t a problem.

Thanks.

Hi
That’s not an easy one as it will depend on
recording method+individual earing capabilities+player+output conditions+musical sensitivity
2 persons can notice or not in a different way
The playing system can show it or not - depending on quality
Someone that knows the music and can feel it will notice the loss well before another that doesn’t
Even using a computer your hardware capabilities can be different
On the other end, if you only listen to the music using your system your ears will get used and your brain will make you think that what you listen to is the real thing…but do not listen to the same music via a good quality Hi-Fi system, please.
So, I’d say you should look for the best codecs for the format you want to use and start making some experiments.
Obviously - you can use other people advise, but I’m not in a position to help you as I avoid to throw away the signal even the one that carries frequencies I know I can’t “listen” to because some of them for sure will influence my perception of the music.
Ah, and my system doesn’t “understant” lossy conversion as much as my computer.

Ok then, for lossless codecs is there anything that can compress higher than the FLAC?

Yes, there are, as an example have a look here: http://synthetic-soul.co.uk/comparison/lossless/
Do keep in mind that the differences in compressed size are usually negligible between lossless codecs, so you should also consider what other factors may or may not interest you, such as encoding/decoding time, hardware support, and so on.
I use WavPack for lossless, and Vorbis for lossy.

Obviously - you can use other people advise, but I’m not in a position to help you as I avoid to throw away the signal even the one that carries frequencies I know I can’t “listen” to because some of them for sure will influence my perception of the music.

What kind of subtle differences do you mean? If you can’t distinguish it, then wouldn’t it just sound like the original? Like with SACD vs CD thing.

I’m trying to fit as many CDs as I can onto a single layer DVD.

Hi
You know, we say I ear this I don’t ear that and we refer to the things we can identify - a note or an instrument.
However, our earing system has some micro pieces suspended in a liquid environement that react to sound waves and gather information that allow our brain to drw conclusions about sound - the one you identify.
There are theories that say there are signals that either contribute to that task (with a role we are not aware of) or “prepare” the system to the “major” waves.
Don’t forget sound is about vibration waves that can be more complex than the ones we get. Thus, some not audible frequencies will envelope harmonics and others will help our ears to acomodate to sudden strong changes.
If you don’t have them you get a kind of “naked” sounds and you risk damage to your earing system because you hit it with sudden attacks without the warning signals.
Sorry if these words are not that clear, but I can guaranty this is not just my own opinion and you can find it written if you search on the subjects.
But if you only play music via your computer most probably you will not notice any of this right away.

What do you mean by “damage to your earing system”? Like damage your ear drums?

Is the WMA 10pro CBR or VBR?

And what is this onepass, twopass thing?