Long term storage for BenQ DVD-R 16x

vbimport

#1

Recently I bought a spindle of BenQ DVD-R 16x. The package shows Made in Malaysia, and the media ID is Daxon (I think it’s Daxon016S). Up till now I’ve burned a few of them with my Pioneer A12FX with no problem (I couldn’t provide scan result, though… :p)

Do you have any opinion regarding the quality of this DVD for long term storage? I know this isn’t like Verbatim or TY, but I wish the BenQ media will provide good quality for, let’s say, around 10 years (mostly kept in storage, either in spindle or jewel case)…

I’m planning to use the media for backing up some PS2 DVD and movies, but I’d like to ask your opinions regarding the media’s quality for long term storage.


#2

For PS2 I look no further than Verbatim 8x DVD-R (MCC02RG20) which can also come as Verbatim Archival Grade or Medical disc etc. It has a scratch proof surface, great for games which are used often, taken in and out etc. Thing I like best is that you can wipe away dust without creating tiny scratches like a normal disc.

For movies I’d say the BenQ Daxons would be fine. I’d even say they’d last 10 years.

But the daxon will probably work great for both. If you are very serious about your burning, it may pay to just buy a liteon and do some scans so you can at least know if there are any massively bad error spots on your discs.


#3

If I had to make a choice, I would go with DAXON AZ3 (+R) instead of DAXON 016S (-R). They’re both stable, and will last, but in my experience the AZ3 burns much better.


#4

Thanks for your positive input, guys, I really appreciate it :slight_smile:

Anyway, I’ve tried backing up some of my PS2 DVD games with Verbatim DVD-R 8x, burned @4x. Strange though, some games (backup) work smoothly, while few others took more time to load, even during mid-game. On one copy of Super Robot Wars Alpha 3 using Verbatim, when I skip the intro, the game went to main menu (NEW GAME, LOAD, etc) but only for a few seconds, then it started the gameplay demo. The original copy won’t do that (it sticks with the main menu).

I tried another burn, this time with a CMS 12x, (ID TYG02, but I don’t know if this is a genuine TY), burned @ 4x, and the game works just fine.

Also, Super Robot Wars Z (again, burned @4x) took longer loading time (even during mid-game) with Verbatim backup, but the BenQ backup (@4x) works fine.

All those were burned using Pioneer A12FX with the latest firmware.


#5

Verbatim 8x DVD-R is best with Pioneer drives @ either 6x or 8x. 4x will give worse results than either 6x or 8x in my experience but should still be ok.

I never heard of CMS 12x… sounds like fake TYG02. Strange that it works without problems on your PS2.


#6

Hmm, no offense, but is this rule (Verbatim 8X burned @ 6-8X) generally works with almost everyone (majority of CDFreaks’ regulars)?

Anyway, I also burned those Verbatim @4x for 2 PS2 games (Super Robot Taisen MX & Super Robot Taisen Alpha 2), and they worked just fine.


#7

Well I have had great results with my 111L @ 6x and 8x on the Verbatim. See if the other people have also.

Just remember, your drive is quite new and most likely calibrated for higher speeds. 4x may indeed be too slow.


#8

[QUOTE=keigo_kanzaki;2176762]Hmm, no offense, but is this rule (Verbatim 8X burned @ 6-8X) generally works with almost everyone (majority of CDFreaks’ regulars)?

Anyway, I also burned those Verbatim @4x for 2 PS2 games (Super Robot Taisen MX & Super Robot Taisen Alpha 2), and they worked just fine.[/QUOTE]

A suggested read regarding slow burning speeds is Did you know: Slow write speeds + modern drives + modern media = no good. Simply being readable doesn’t mean the burn quality was the best - sometimes they are just bordering on “acceptable” (as some of your experiences has shown).

The forum’s usual recommendation for the highest quality burn using modern/newer drives are 6-8x for 8x media, and 8-12x for 16x media - cd pirate is spot on.


#9

Alright then, I think I’ll try 6x to backup Batman Beyond: Return of The Joker :bigsmile:

However, it doesn’t mean that my previous 4X burns was THAT bad (below average), right? I’m hoping they’ll also last for quite a long time before I make another backup…

I just thought, it would be a waste to just throw them away immediately and make another copy…


#10

about the guide, I’ve read it even before I wrote those 4x Verb. One line that I catched (from Albert’s post) is:

[B]Do NOT go lower than half[/B] the rated speed for DVD media, unless specifically required for successful writing

I thought that going with half speed was also within the ‘safe’ limit…


#11

[quote=keigo_kanzaki;2176917][B]Do NOT go lower than half[/B] the rated speed for DVD media, unless specifically required for successful writing[/quote] Most 16x media will burn fine at 6x in most current DVD burners (provided they can burn fine at all).

6x is usually not better than 8x but there are some (rare) cases where it is better.
You will need to scan and compare burns in order to find the cases where 6x is an improvement over 8x burning - don’t just assume it will be better, because most of the time it will just be slower and sometimes it will be slightly worse than 8x.

4x should not be used with 16x rated media in modern desktop burners unless testing shows it to be better, because usually it is a non-optimized burning speed that produces inferior results.

Laptop drives are different in that they have a maximum burning speed of 8x for DVD media, and they usually don’t perform their best at maximum speed.


#12

[QUOTE=keigo_kanzaki;2176917]about the guide, I’ve read it even before I wrote those 4x Verb. One line that I catched (from Albert’s post) is:

[B]Do NOT go lower than half[/B] the rated speed for DVD media, unless specifically required for successful writing

I thought that going with half speed was also within the ‘safe’ limit…[/QUOTE]

It still is correct, if it was 16x media. :wink: From experience with newer burners, a 6x write speed on 8x rated media does result in higher quality burns - there are, however, some exceptions where 8x actually results in better burns (but never 4x with modern drives). 4x is awfully slow for new drives that are hitting 22x, even for “older” 16x drives. 4x for an 8x max drive is probably ok, but for 16x and higher - not recommended.

EDIT: Beat to the punch (just a few seconds!) by Drage… :stuck_out_tongue:


#13

so, to summarize how well burning quality is for 8x media on modern drives (let’s say, Pioneer), how would you grade them in 1-10 scale? Is it like this:

@8x: ? (depends)
@6x: 9
@4x: 7
@2x:


#14

More like:
8x: :smiley:
6x: :bigsmile:
4x: :rolleyes:
2x: :Z

Lol. :slight_smile:


#15

I understand. Thanks, cd pirate, drage, and evo :cool: