Little Known Disk + Question + Other Stuff

Hello everyone. My name is Jim and I live in Oregon, USA. This is one heckovasite with a lot of great info and stuff…so I am really glad to have found it. I am a newb, but not to computers by any means. I’ve been working with computers since the 1970’s…

I thought I would, as a newb, share some stuff I know and ask a couple of questions here.

I read a magazine called Maximum PC, it’s a PC mag mainly for hardware freaks and those of us who love to tweak our computers…but over the years it has headed to the gamer direction. Still, it has a fair amount of hardware reviews and sometimes, some startling information or news releases.

I think it was a year or two ago I read in Max PC, about research work being conducted in developing a disk made of paper about the thickness of a cardboard stock paper, size of a US quarter, which could hold up to 70 Teribytes of information on it.

I also recently read an article in the Oregonian newspaper (our main newspaper in Oregon) on reasearch work being done on bio-organic molecules which will allow (in the future) a disk with size about the same as a DVD or CD, but have a capacity up to 1 - 3 Pecobytes (that is 1000 - 3000 Teribytes). I know this sounds fantastic, but the fact of the matter is, the companies that are making mere 4.7 - 9 Gigabyte DVD’s know a lot more than they are telling or saying. I am sure they are keenly aware of this research work being done.

In fact, they already know, you can get up to 18 Gigabytes on the same kind of DVD they are now selling without the aforementioned research developments being released. Yet dual layer disks at 9 Gigs cost a fortune, even though dual layer burners have been out for several years. It’s apparent there is a lot of foot dragging going on by the “Big Boys.” I am referring to the “format wars” of just a few years back when the two main camps of manufacturer’s couldn’t agree on a single DVD format, thus creating a plethora of formats …DVD+, DVD-, etc.

One of these days, we are all going to have a laugh about how much we paid for the DVD’s we now have as we do when we think about how much we paid for hard disks 20 years ago when they had a mere 10 Megabyte capacity total and we paid $300 for one of those hard disks! I think with the advent of “Live” CD’s with a load and unload operating system on it, we could essentially have a read-write DVD disk with 3 Picobytes total capacity and completely eliminate hard disks all together.

The DVD’s we now have are “obsolete” the moment these new technologies are finally released, only I am wondering how long it will be before we actually see these things.

Imagine having one CD or DVD sized disk, that could contain up to 3 Picobytes of data on it. At that point, we might be able to store all the data contained in 1000 Library of Congress’ and still have enough room to put stuff on there till doomsday.

I am just wondering who else on this site knows about this research going on. Discussion has to begin somewhere if we aren’t going to have to wait until the year 2347 for the foot draggers to release already accomplished research work.

[quote=jimc52;1922528]Hello everyone. My name is Jim and I live in Oregon, USA. This is one heckovasite with a lot of great info and stuff…so I am really glad to have found it. I am a newb, but not to computers by any means. I’ve been working with computers since the 1970’s…

I thought I would, as a newb, share some stuff I know and ask a couple of questions here.

I read a magazine called Maximum PC, it’s a PC mag mainly for hardware freaks and those of us who love to tweak our computers…but over the years it has headed to the gamer direction. Still, it has a fair amount of hardware reviews and sometimes, some startling information or news releases.

I think it was a year or two ago I read in Max PC, about research work being conducted in developing a disk made of paper about the thickness of a cardboard stock paper, size of a US quarter, which could hold up to 70 Teribytes of information on it.

I also recently read an article in the Oregonian newspaper (our main newspaper in Oregon) on reasearch work being done on bio-organic molecules which will allow (in the future) a disk with size about the same as a DVD or CD, but have a capacity up to 1 - 3 Pecobytes (that is 1000 - 3000 Teribytes). I know this sounds fantastic, but the fact of the matter is, the companies that are making mere 4.7 - 9 Gigabyte DVD’s know a lot more than they are telling or saying. I am sure they are keenly aware of this research work being done.

In fact, they already know, you can get up to 18 Gigabytes on the same kind of DVD they are now selling without the aforementioned research developments being released. Yet dual layer disks at 9 Gigs cost a fortune, even though dual layer burners have been out for several years. It’s apparent there is a lot of foot dragging going on by the “Big Boys.” I am referring to the “format wars” of just a few years back when the two main camps of manufacturer’s couldn’t agree on a single DVD format, thus creating a plethora of formats …DVD+, DVD-, etc.

One of these days, we are all going to have a laugh about how much we paid for the DVD’s we now have as we do when we think about how much we paid for hard disks 20 years ago when they had a mere 10 Megabyte capacity total and we paid $300 for one of those hard disks! I think with the advent of “Live” CD’s with a load and unload operating system on it, we could essentially have a read-write DVD disk with 3 Picobytes total capacity and completely eliminate hard disks all together.

The DVD’s we now have are “obsolete” the moment these new technologies are finally released, only I am wondering how long it will be before we actually see these things.

Imagine having one CD or DVD sized disk, that could contain up to 3 Picobytes of data on it. At that point, we might be able to store all the data contained in 1000 Library of Congress’ and still have enough room to put stuff on there till doomsday.

I am just wondering who else on this site knows about this research going on. Discussion has to begin somewhere if we aren’t going to have to wait until the year 2347 for the foot draggers to release already accomplished research work.[/quote]
We have a Tape Library at my job made by StorageTek that can hold a couple hunded Pecobytes but on many different drives LOL.
http://www.sun.com/storagetek/tape_storage/tape_libraries/sl8500/

Dear Alan:

Whew, that’s very interesting, but you know what the problem with tape drives are…seek times must be like “forever” on a 200 pecobyte tape…
loss of oxidation on tapes, they break, etc. I can’t imagine what you would store on such a tape or how long it would take to write to or restore from it. I haven’t worked with a tape backup for many years, but I do remember how LONG it took for a mere 50 MB tape backup system to rev itself forward to the last session position, then determine if it had enough storage left to do another backup, then start to write new data at an egregiously slow and ponderously forever rate. Even today, such tape backup systems are horrendously slow…even though I don’t know what Sun’s backup system can do…but I imagine, the very nature of mechanical systems as they are, it must still be horrendously SLOOOOWWWW…

Do you happen to know how long it takes for the Sun tape system to find one piece of data on a 200 Picobyte system?:doh:

I am VERY excited about the bio-organic molecule idea. The concept lies a lot in how they are working on substances and systems very similar to human nerve and memory cells work…and the electrical properties are infinitely smaller than the electrical resistance properties of non-organic materials. If I remember right, it might even be Intel who is working on this bio-organic research…but doggone if I didn’t cut the article out of the newspaper and keep it for future reference. I think this is the most exciting development to come up since Thomas Edison created the first copper cylinder to store data (sounds) to be recorded upon for replay…The exciting part is not only the capacities that are possible, but also the next to NIL electrical resistances that no non-organic electronic system is capable of reproducing except at near zero degrees Kelvin.

Jim

[quote=jimc52;1923000]Dear Alan:

Whew, that’s very interesting, but you know what the problem with tape drives are…seek times must be like “forever” on a 200 pecobyte tape…
loss of oxidation on tapes, they break, etc. I can’t imagine what you would store on such a tape or how long it would take to write to or restore from it. I haven’t worked with a tape backup for many years, but I do remember how LONG it took for a mere 50 MB tape backup system to rev itself forward to the last session position, then determine if it had enough storage left to do another backup, then start to write new data at an egregiously slow and ponderously forever rate. Even today, such tape backup systems are horrendously slow…even though I don’t know what Sun’s backup system can do…but I imagine, the very nature of mechanical systems as they are, it must still be horrendously SLOOOOWWWW…

Do you happen to know how long it takes for the Sun tape system to find one piece of data on a 200 Picobyte system?:doh:

I am VERY excited about the bio-organic molecule idea. The concept lies a lot in how they are working on substances and systems very similar to human nerve and memory cells work…and the electrical properties are infinitely smaller than the electrical resistance properties of non-organic materials. If I remember right, it might even be Intel who is working on this bio-organic research…but doggone if I didn’t cut the article out of the newspaper and keep it for future reference. I think this is the most exciting development to come up since Thomas Edison created the first copper cylinder to store data (sounds) to be recorded upon for replay…The exciting part is not only the capacities that are possible, but also the next to NIL electrical resistances that no non-organic electronic system is capable of reproducing except at near zero degrees Kelvin.

Jim[/quote]
They really are not “tape” , they are disc drives, it just called a Tape Library

Do you ever wonder why each year the new automobiles add only a tidbit of advancement, knowing that they are selling cars that could have been produced 30 years sooner? Fuel injection was used back in the fifties, and it took 25 years before they let us start having it on production cars. GPS is old stuff too. All manufacturing gives the consumer just a little bit of advancement at a time to maximize profits. Retail PC’s are years behind those that are used in the high tech industry.