Liteonit have unleased the LVD 2002

The LVD 2002 is the best ever dvd player to hit the market! It looks nice and only 58mm in height. But there are far more things lurking inside this player, such as the ability too support playback of divx and xvid on a cd, no more having to convert to svcd etc. It doesn’t stop there, go and have a read on the 110% LEGAL link at the bottom of this post :bigsmile:

This is the only dvd player on the market worth purchasing has all the video and sound outputs you could wish for.

Only one flaw but nothing you can’t bypass and that is the lack of a scart output.

But it more than makes up for this with s-video, Composite Video and component video outputs.

When it released I will buy one :cool:

It replaces its previous model the LVD 2001

http://www.liteonit.com/DC/english/lvd_2002.htm

Greetz The Diplomat :smiley:

It doesn’t says “XviD support” anywhere…

The LVD 2002 is the best ever dvd player to hit the market!
I fail to see why the 2002 is better than the 2001. Yeah, it’s a higher model number but that’s about it. In fact, the 2002 has LESS features than the 2001. The 2002 is the same exact dimension as the 2001 and supports everything the 2001 does, except the 2001 also has a PCMCIA memory card input for reading the 5 standard digital camera memory cards.

If you ask me, the 2001 is a better product, although if you don’t want the photo support, than maybe the 2002 will be priced lower.

Last night I eagerly opened the box for my Lite-On LVD-2001 “media player”. I’m choosing to call this unit a “media player” because DVD player just does not do it justice. A DVD player usually will only play DVDs from a single region. The LVD-2001 player will play DVDs from every region, MPEG 1, 2, 3 and 4 files and will even display JPEG files using a PCMCIA adapter.

When I first connected the LVD-2001 unit to my television, I quickly dug through some CDs of divx files I already had burned. I found a movie that I previously had viewed on my PC, one that I knew was of high quality. I waited a few seconds… first it told me it was detecting and disk… then I waited a few more seconds. The unit then reported that the file was of an unsupported format; so back to the CD pile I went. For the next 5 disks, I did not find a single divx file that would play on the unit.

Then I thought about firmware updates, so I went to look in the setup to see if it would give me a revision date. I pushed the setup button on the remote, but nothing happened. I pushed again, still nothing. Then for no apparent reason, I thought to remove the disk that was currently in the unit. Only then would the unit bring me into setup mode. It was a little annoying that the unit was so picky, but it was an acceptable annoyance.

I saw that the unit shipped with firmware 0.2.23, so off to the web I went. I first tried www.liteon.com, but the server was not found. OK, so now off to Google to find the right URL. I spent the next 10 minutes fruitlessly searching Google but could only find the Taiwan Lite-On site that didn’t list the LVD-2001 unit and did not have a link to the US site. I then spotted an email address on some paperwork and plugged that URL into the browser, this time it worked. www.liteonit.com turns out to be the companies website.

I then went to the support page and found the firmware update link for my unit. I downloaded the firmware zip file, based upon it’s name it was version 0.2.27. After the download completed, I unzipped the file to find 2 word documents, 1 pdf and one .nrg file. I read the documents to see how to create an update disk, but couldn’t find any obvious information.

The pdf was the same as one of the word documents; it started off with instructions on how to create a boot disk with Nero, including that you need to point Nero to linux.bin. Great! I need linux.bin to update my drive, but the only binary file included is an .nrg file. Then I began to wonder, could .nrg be a Nero file? So I did a Google search and found that my hunch was right. I then went back to the firmware instructions and saw that under the linux.bin instructions was a second set of instructions telling that the .nrg file could be used to create a CD.

At this point I was a little annoyed, not only did Lite-On use a proprietary CD image format for software they did not include and software I did not have, but they also included installation instructions that included a ton of steps that had nothing to do with the files it was packaged with. I ended up downloading the Nero demo and creating the disk, but by this time an hour had passed since I unboxed my unit and I still had not played any divx files.

I took the firmware CD to my unit and successfully updated the firmware in about 2 minutes. After the update, the unit played virtually all of my divx files, however there were a couple of divx files that had an unsupported audio codec. I do not blame Lite-On for this, I do realize there are idiots out there who use random-audio-codec-x for reasons God only knows.

I am very happy with my unit, however I wish they had better information on how to update the firmware and wish they would use the standard ISO CD format. I do not use Nero because I choose to use another package that I paid a good bit of money for. I can’t say that I understand the rational behind their choice to use the .nrg format instead of an ISO.

All in all I think this is a good unit and well worth the $150 price tag. I just hope Lite-On smoothes out the rough edges a bit.

I also agree that the LVD-2001 is a kickass player. I also had a bit of problem playing some of the divx anime files I’ve downloaded before but I associate this for the cheap cdr used and the 48x burning speed I used. For the most part, the divx files play fine.

I also noticed the recent addition of the LVD-2002 model but that to me is a less expensive model for the bigger market as not everyone will need a PCMCIA slot to view pictures or other things. I can see Lite-On selling this particular model around US$100 to compete with other mainstream progressive scan dvd players from Sony, Panasonic, Toshiba etc.

I just ordered the LVD 2001 at mwave.com and they claim it is discontinuted. Now their menu reads LVD 2002 and the LVD 2001 is no longer listed. I had a hard time tracking this model down, but finally found it at www.videos2dvd.com . They have not confirmed the order yet, after 24 hours, so I hope they actually do carry it.

I fail to see why the 2002 is better than the 2001. Yeah, it’s a higher model number but that’s about it. In fact, the 2002 has LESS features than the 2001. The 2002 is the same exact dimension as the 2001 and supports everything the 2001 does, except the 2001 also has a PCMCIA memory card input for reading the 5 standard digital camera memory cards.

One additional difference I noticed between the LVD 2001 and the LVD 2002 was in the specs. The LVD specs state, “480i scalable to 480p & 1080i” while the LVD 2002 spec states, “480i scalable to 480p.” According to some folks I spoke with, this makes it a superior to the LVD 2002.

anyone got their 2001 to play dvd-r movies smoothly?

I still prefer the newer KiSS/RevoY models, as they seem to play everything and have a network connections, something I really like…

And… they come in black (I hate silver colored devices)…