Lite-On drives spin too fast when playing MP3 CDs

When I play an MP3 CD on my computer, my drive spins so fast that it seems like it’s at about 1,000X and makes so much noise it sounds like a rocket blasting off and I can barely hear the audio that’s playing, plus when I take the CD out of the drive it’s so hot that it just about burns my fingers to the touch. None of that, I’m sure, is good for my drive, and I doubt that it’s good for the CD either.

And it does this on both drives I have on my computer, the original LTN 485S plain CD-ROM drive that was originally on my computer and the Lite-On LTR-40125W burner drive that I installed.

I don’t have many MP3 CDs in my collection, but was attempting to make copies of a couple that I have which feature old radio broadcasts of news, speeches, etc., from World War II. I was able to make the copies, but my drive got so hot during the process … I had a devil of a time in Nero (am using the latest version) controlling the read and burn speeds, finally got it OK but then the second the burn stopped, the drive started spinning like a maniac again until I was able to close out the program and eject the disc … that I ended up making the first coaster I’ve produced in ages (was using TY media, no cheapo stuff) because I think the drive got overheated (it’s happened before, someone once told me that Lite-On drives were persnickety that way, it basically locked the computer up to where I had to flip the main power switch before I could reboot, and the light on the drive was showing bright orange). I let the thing cool off for an hour and tried again with no problems.

Is this a common problem with MP3 CDs and these drives? As I said, I’ve had very little experience with those, and I normally listen to the few I have on a portable Phillips Expanium player with good results, but I’d like the option to play them on my computer and to make copies. Is there a fix for this, a way to slow the drive down to less than a breakneck speed and a much quieter spin, or is this just something you have to live with? Because again, I really fear playing this under these conditions is not good for the health of my drives or the longevity of the CDs. Thanks!

Originally posted by GregB
When I play an MP3 CD on my computer, my drive spins so fast that it seems like it’s at about 1,000X and makes so much noise it sounds like a rocket blasting off and I can barely hear the audio that’s playing, plus when I take the CD out of the drive it’s so hot that it just about burns my fingers to the touch.

Could there possibly be a wee bit of exaggeration here? :bigsmile: Maybe you should use fireplace tongs to remove the CD. :cool:

If you download Nero Drive Speed and set the drive speed to its lowest setting, it will be very quiet and may prevent your fingers from being burned. :wink:

A CDRW is for burning CDs if you haven’t read the label. Copy your MP3s to your HD and all your noise complains will be solved. No space left on HD you say? Well, get a cheap 40GB.

BTW, it bad case ventilation and warm room temperature could both cause your drives to overheat. You might want to think about getting a better case w/ better air circulation, 'cause it’ll save more than your drives.

Inertia: Nero stuff is downloaded, and I learned a little bit about what goes on with reading Mode 1 CD-ROMs by reading the faq at the site. What speed setting would you advise?

Stoner: I’m certainly aware that a CDRW drive is for burning, but it’s supposed to play too. The tech who installed my drive advised me to remove the other drive and just use the 40125W for everything; I chose not to, in order to avoid overuse of the burning drive. Normally, I use the old CD-ROM drive for playing audio on my computer and I tried it first in this instance, the only reason I tried to use the burning drive to play the MP3s was to see if it would work at a slower speed because the old one wouldn’t.

Originally posted by Inertia
[B]

If you download Nero Drive Speed and set the drive speed to its lowest setting, it will be very quiet and may prevent your fingers from being burned. :wink: [/B]

Again, set the drive speed to its lowest setting.

GregB
You should never get a hot disc out of your drive. If you do, your drive is not adequately cooled. This causes severe wear, and even increases write and read problems in the drive. If you do read-error tests on the same drive at hot and cool operating temps, you will see what i mean. An adequately cooled tower is no more than a few degrees above room temp. 10 degrees above room temp would be a reasonable max if you can’t stand the sound of fans.
The average OEM tower is cooled only for one HD and one CD, and marginal cooling at that. At least ad a fan in the front, to blow across the drives. My own OEM mid-tower, with 2 HD’s and 2 CD’s, max RAM, etc., etc., would run 15-20’ above room temp with the OEM cooling.
One good thing, with all the fans running, I barely can hear the CDRW drive! :eek:

Inertia: My bad for not reading your post completely, has been a rough couple of days at work and my brains are kinda scrambled at present.:wink:

rdgrimes: I have taken some steps to get better ventilation and cooling for my computer, plus as I go along I’m figuring out more and more of what I need to be doing (I’m a newbie, have only been burner enabled since June), so on just plain CD burning (which I’ve always done at slow speeds, BTW; I do a fair amount of trading and I always extract and burn at 4X) I don’t get hot discs, at worst they’re just the slightest bit warm to the touch and that’s only when I do like two or three in a row (I also never do more than that many in a row to keep from overtaxing my burner). I think the reason I got hot discs this time … and to say that these were hot enough to burn my fingers may have been a little hyperbole if not exaggeration, but they were HOT, the hottest I’ve ever dealt with :a … is because in trying to fool with these discs, my drives had been cranking at 48X (max speed on both) for like 15 minutes apiece, and I’m sure that tends to cause a bit of heat. I think I’ll be OK now that I have CD Speed and have figured out how to use it to slow things down.

You’ve demonstrated that it’s the RPM, not the laser, that generates heat in a CDRW drive. If it were the laser, slow speeds would create hoter discs. I can run 8-10 discs through my CD drives at 48x speed before the disc even starts to feel slightly warm, and they never get “hot”. The exception is playing a DVD movie for 2 hours, then it gets “warm” but not hot. This was not the case before I discovered fans. But to my surprise, cooling the CD drives also solved read-error problems that I was having with a LiteOn CDRW. Coool is cool.