Libraries attempt to woo younger generations with digital features

vbimport

#1

Libraries attempt to woo younger generations with digital features.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/09/Z71xEY.jpg[/newsimage]Some may say convincing kids that libraries are cool is a fool's errand, but several libraries are taking steps to reverse the nerdy connotations and make them part of the daily routine.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/libraries-attempt-to-woo-younger-generations-with-digital-features-34814/](http://www.myce.com/news/libraries-attempt-to-woo-younger-generations-with-digital-features-34814/)


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#2

I like what some libraries are doing - getting rid of some books and opening up meeting areas for clubs.


#3

Slow, tedious, cumbersome.
Scan those buggers into a PC library, and you can flick through them faster, index them, pick out key points and search them … either in the library or remotely … nuff said.

Move with the times man …

[U][I][B]The Wong Library houses the largest collection of literature in the universe.[/B][/I][/U]


#4

[QUOTE=RTV71;2547349]I like what some libraries are doing - getting rid of some books and opening up meeting areas for clubs.[/QUOTE]

Most libraries I visit have some sort of meeting room available. What I find sad is most now have security officers patrolling the stacks when school lets out and students flock to the library like it’s a rec center and the ubiquitous use of cell phones. Even more discouraging is this trend, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/27/business/27libraries.html?_r=1.


#5

[QUOTE=Whappo;2547551]Most libraries I visit have some sort of meeting room available. What I find sad is most now have security officers patrolling the stacks when school lets out and students flock to the library like it’s a rec center and the ubiquitous use of cell phones. Even more discouraging is this trend, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/27/business/27libraries.html?_r=1.[/QUOTE]
Holy $#!+ dude!
The problem with any privatisation is that they prefer 100% utilisation to maximise profit - there’s a problem. The service can’t cater for maximum demand, it only caters for a demand which is optimised to provide maximum profit for the business.

Eventually, the libraries will be fully privatised because the government will not want to pay for the upkeep … and people will be paying to access basic knowledge.

Quite simply, following privatisation of public schools, libraries and universities, americans will have restricted access to knowledge (based on ability ot pay), and the nation will get dumber … will find it harder to find/create jobs and thereby limiting the potential income for the population and the government.

Does anyone else see the irony in privatising public services?

Looky here:


#6

[QUOTE=debro;2547548]Slow, tedious, cumbersome.[/QUOTE]

I know - but there’s still something inherently cool about the process. :slight_smile:


#7

Digital media is replacing traditional media. Nowhere is that more apparent than in digital books on ereaders & internet media tablets. Eventually the space used for BOOKS will become less and less. While that’s a good thing, the library will need to justify the space used and its commitment to technology and access to media to the taxpayers. Finally it may just be possible to compete with retail and rental companies such as netflix when media ‘lending’ is no more comlpex than using a library bar code number and password to have access to quality media for NO cost. In addition virtual library resources may do away with the physical presence altogether in certain circumstances. I think that would be a bad idea as libraries also provide free power to patrons who bring their electronic devices so you wouldn’t have that access for the poor anymore. So unless that was replaced with somwehre the poor could use electronic devices for free with connectivity-- I’d be against closing a physical presence down altogether.