LG BH16NS40 vs Pioneer BDR-2209 - which to keep?

vbimport

#84

Here’s a trt I just did of the movie Point Break, 40GB, with silent mode off



#85

And here’s a trt for the same disc on the LG, interestingly slower:



#86

BD-ROM DL at 8x (peak) is consistent with the specs for the Pioneer. It’s 12x for BD-ROM SL only.
My graph comes in a bit below that, but it’s also a smaller than full-size disc so that could be part of it?
The same speeds are quoted as the max for the LG in its specs, but it only reaches 6x. That’s the top-rated speed for BD-R LTH, and while this disc is identified as BD-R (because of AnyDVD), that doesn’t seem to make much sense as an explanation. Also note that while 7.6 is recognized as the top read speed in the drop-down menu, this seems to map to 6x in actuality (since the other options appears to be 4x, 2x, and, laughably, 0x).

(Oh, and actually, the movie is Disc One of ‘The Ten Commandments’, not ‘Point Break’.)


#87

@bilditup1: Well, it’s not 12x, but the Pioneer clearly has some advantage over the LG, right? For me, the graph is slightly better and I think there is no faster drive for ripping BRs in the market than the Pioneer (according to the graphs).

And a last question please: Do you think that this utility could work with the BDR-208EBK?

Thank you very much again


#88

Well, I’ve already seen that the 2208 is identical to the 208EBK sold in Europe, simply different name for other countries like USA.

I’ve taken a look to the utility for the 2208 (208EBK), and is very very interesting. It allows to disable the Auto Quiet Mode (aka “RipLock”) permanently (changes are written to the firmware, there is no need to reapply settings on each reboot). There are 4 modes available.
From the help file:

  1. Persistent Quiet Mode

The drive will keep spinning in low speed to avoid the operational and wind noise.

  1. Quiet Mode

The default setting is Quiet Mode. The drive quickly adjusts its spinning speed depending on a situation. In other words, the drive will basically keep spinning in low speed to avoid the operational and wind noise when high speed performance is not necessary, while start spinning in high speed when it is required.
Note A. The drive may switch to high speed performance during high quality video playback.
Note B. Switching from high speed setting to low speed setting during video playback may cause occasional pauses in video.

  1. Performance Mode

After inserting the disc, the disc will spin in high speed in order to achieve the high performance from the beginning. When watching movie titles and playing CD audio, the drive will switch to low speed performance.
Note C. The drive may not switch to low speed performance during high quality video playback.
Note D. Switching from high speed performance to low speed performance during video playback may cause occasional pauses in video.

  1. Standard Mode

Disable the Quiet Drive Feature. The drive will consistently operate in maximum performance except when playing commercial-released BD/DVD titles, which will be played in low speed. Some software might have better compatibility with Standard Mode.

I think the last one (Standard mode) is the preferred mode for my needs (rip at max speed), but I’m a bit concerned with this part: “[B]except when playing commercial-released BD/DVD titles[/B]”

What do you think? And I suspect that this utility will work with other Pio BD drives too, because there is a picture in the help file applying settings to a BD-207M… just speculating.


#89

There are about 3 levels of support for the Pioneer Drive Utility:

[1] No support whatsoever. The utility will not work with basic bare-bones/OEM drives [drives not shipped with software in a full retail package].

[2] Limited support for select features. Depending on how the drive is marketed and programmed in firmware, it may identify itself as being capable of a certain subset of the features allowed by the full Drive Utility, and will only work with the stripped-down version of the Drive Utility.

[3] Full support for all features. Again, depending on how the drive is marketed and programmed in firmware, it may identify itself as being a full retail drive, with full support for every feature supported by the full version of the Drive Utility.

Some other notes:
-The Drive Utility for one drive may not work with a drive from another generation, even if that other drive technically supports all those fancy features.
-The major determining factor, as we see it, is the kernel ID/signature/version, which varies depending on the region where the drive is sold, if the drive is OEM or retail, etc.

So first, check to see if the drive is marketed as supporting the additional features of the Drive Utility. If not, it’s probably not going to work.

If you ended up with a drive and didn’t know what drive utility and firmware updates are available for it, finding out the kernel ID (normal/ID43/ID58/ID60/etc) would indicate how “premium” the drive is, indicate whether or not you could use any variant of the Drive Utility, and indicate which firmware update (if any) is available for your drive.

If you can find a full retail version of the drive (BDR-2208 or BDR-2209 is the U.S. retail package, BDR-S09J is the full fancy Japanese retail package, etc), it will probably support the Drive Utility. OEM (drive-only) ‘packages’ probably will not support the drive utility.

So even though the 2208 package contains a drive that supports BD-XL like the 208EBK, it is not guaranteed that the 208EBK would support the other premium features. In a way, even though the hardware is always the same and can use the same firmware, the drives really aren’t the same drives when it comes to the extra software features (thanks to the different kernel versions).


#90

[QUOTE=Albert;2727149]There are about 3 levels of support for the Pioneer Drive Utility:

[1] No support whatsoever. The utility will not work with basic bare-bones/OEM drives [drives not shipped with software in a full retail package].

[2] Limited support for select features. Depending on how the drive is marketed and programmed in firmware, it may identify itself as being capable of a certain subset of the features allowed by the full Drive Utility, and will only work with the stripped-down version of the Drive Utility.

[3] Full support for all features. Again, depending on how the drive is marketed and programmed in firmware, it may identify itself as being a full retail drive, with full support for every feature supported by the full version of the Drive Utility.

Some other notes:
-The Drive Utility for one drive may not work with a drive from another generation, even if that other drive technically supports all those fancy features.
-The major determining factor, as we see it, is the kernel ID/signature/version, which varies depending on the region where the drive is sold, if the drive is OEM or retail, etc.

So first, check to see if the drive is marketed as supporting the additional features of the Drive Utility. If not, it’s probably not going to work.

If you ended up with a drive and didn’t know what drive utility and firmware updates are available for it, finding out the kernel ID (normal/ID43/ID58/ID60/etc) would indicate how “premium” the drive is, indicate whether or not you could use any variant of the Drive Utility, and indicate which firmware update (if any) is available for your drive.

If you can find a full retail version of the drive (BDR-2208 or BDR-2209 is the U.S. retail package, BDR-S09J is the full fancy Japanese retail package, etc), it will probably support the Drive Utility. OEM (drive-only) ‘packages’ probably will not support the drive utility.

So even though the 2208 package contains a drive that supports BD-XL like the 208EBK, it is not guaranteed that the 208EBK would support the other premium features. In a way, even though the hardware is always the same and can use the same firmware, the drives really aren’t the same drives when it comes to the extra software features (thanks to the different kernel versions).[/QUOTE]
Thank you for your detailed (and a bit complex) explanation. I’m going to buy either the BDR-208EBK (2208 is not available in Europe, I’m spanish, and the import is very expensive, even excluding the taxes) or the S09XLT. Unfortunately the S08XLT is out of stock in Europe and an import is again discarded. Do you think the S09XLT is the “top drive” of the series? I already know that the S09 is a bit poorer than the S08 regarding burn quality, but I’m leaning toward Pio BD drives because one of my goals is to rip commercial BD movies (most of them are DL) at the max speed possible.


#91

[QUOTE=HiddenUser;2727115]@bilditup1: Well, it’s not 12x, but the Pioneer clearly has some advantage over the LG, right?[/QUOTE]

Hold your horses! This is why you wait for the results of more testing.
When using identical setting in eac3to to rip the same disc, it takes the same amt of time, like 25 minutes to rip:

eac3to v3.27
command line: eac3to F: 1) 1: bh1_lg.txt 2: video.h264 3: audio.wav 13: audio2.ac3 14: audio3.ac3 15: Eng.sup

M2TS, 1 video track, 12 audio tracks, 26 subtitle tracks, 2:21:53, 24p /1.001
1: Chapters, 40 chapters
2: h264/AVC, 1080p24 /1.001 (16:9)
3: DTS Master Audio, English, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 48kHz
(core: DTS, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 1509kbps, 48kHz)
4: AC3, French, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
5: AC3, German, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
6: AC3, Italian, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
7: AC3, Spanish, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
8: AC3, Portuguese, 1.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
9: AC3, Czech, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
10: AC3, Hungarian, 1.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
11: AC3, Polish, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
12: AC3, Japanese, 1.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
13: AC3 Surround, English, 2.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
14: AC3 Surround, English, 2.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
15: Subtitle (PGS), English

Creating file “bh1_lg.txt”…
[a14] Extracting audio track number 14…
[s15] Extracting subtitle track number 15…
[v02] Extracting video track number 2…
[a14] Removing AC3 dialog normalization…
[a13] Extracting audio track number 13…
[a03] Extracting audio track number 3…
[a13] Removing AC3 dialog normalization…
[a03] Decoding with ArcSoft DTS Decoder…
[a03] Writing WAV…
[a03] Creating file “audio.wav”…
[v02] Creating file “video.h264”…
[a13] Creating file “audio2.ac3”…
[a14] Creating file “audio3.ac3”…
[s15] Creating file “Eng.sup”…
[a03] The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 24 bits.
[a03] Caution: The WAV file is bigger than 4GB. <WARNING>
[a03] Some WAV readers might not be able to handle this file correctly. <WARNING>
Video track 2 contains 204102 frames.
Subtitle track 15 contains 1218 captions.
[B]eac3to processing took 25 minutes, 42 seconds.
[/B]Done.

eac3to v3.27
command line: eac3to G: 1) 1: bh1_pio.txt 2: video.h264 3: audio.wav 13: audio2.ac3 14: audio3.ac3 15: Eng.sup

M2TS, 1 video track, 12 audio tracks, 26 subtitle tracks, 2:21:53, 24p /1.001
1: Chapters, 40 chapters
2: h264/AVC, 1080p24 /1.001 (16:9)
3: DTS Master Audio, English, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 48kHz
(core: DTS, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 1509kbps, 48kHz)
4: AC3, French, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
5: AC3, German, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
6: AC3, Italian, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
7: AC3, Spanish, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
8: AC3, Portuguese, 1.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
9: AC3, Czech, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
10: AC3, Hungarian, 1.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
11: AC3, Polish, 5.1 channels, 448kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
12: AC3, Japanese, 1.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
13: AC3 Surround, English, 2.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
14: AC3 Surround, English, 2.0 channels, 192kbps, 48kHz, dialnorm: -27dB
15: Subtitle (PGS), English

Creating file “bh1_pio.txt”…
[s15] Extracting subtitle track number 15…
[a14] Extracting audio track number 14…
[v02] Extracting video track number 2…
[a13] Extracting audio track number 13…
[a03] Extracting audio track number 3…
[a14] Removing AC3 dialog normalization…
[a13] Removing AC3 dialog normalization…
[a03] Decoding with ArcSoft DTS Decoder…
[a03] Writing WAV…
[a03] Creating file “audio.wav”…
[v02] Creating file “video.h264”…
[a13] Creating file “audio2.ac3”…
[a14] Creating file “audio3.ac3”…
[s15] Creating file “Eng.sup”…
[a03] The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 24 bits.
[a03] Caution: The WAV file is bigger than 4GB. <WARNING>
[a03] Some WAV readers might not be able to handle this file correctly. <WARNING>
Video track 2 contains 204102 frames.
Subtitle track 15 contains 1218 captions.
[B]eac3to processing took 25 minutes, 52 seconds.[/B]
Done.

Opti Drive Control has more than a few quirky bugs. One of them appears to be with this LG - the max read speed is limited to 7.6x but this maps to 6x in actuality in ODC. But when using ImgBurn, this actually seems to map to 7.6x, and the two drives are about the same in speed again. I forgot to make ODC compatible graphs in the ImgBurn options, but did save the log:

I 17:04:29 ImgBurn Version 2.5.8.0 started!
I 17:04:29 Microsoft Windows 8 Professional x64 Edition (6.2, Build 9200)
I 17:04:29 Total Physical Memory: 33,242,052 KiB - Available: 29,378,180 KiB
W 17:04:29 AnyDVD can interfere with ImgBurn’s ability to verify accurately, please ensure it’s disabled!
I 17:04:29 Initialising SPTI…
I 17:04:29 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices…
I 17:04:29 -> Drive 1 - Info: HL-DT-ST BD-RE BH16NS40 1.03-A0 (F:) (SATA)
I 17:04:30 -> Drive 2 - Info: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-208M 1.10-ID60 (G:) (SATA)
I 17:04:30 Found 2 BD-RE XLs!
I 17:09:43 Operation Started!
I 17:09:43 Source Device: [0:0:0] HL-DT-ST BD-RE BH16NS40 1.03 (F:) (SATA)
I 17:09:43 Source Media Type: BD-R
I 17:09:43 Source Media Supported Read Speeds: 2x, 4x, 6x, 7.6x
I 17:09:43 Source Media Supported Write Speeds: 1.4x
I 17:09:43 Source Media Sectors: 20,446,432
I 17:09:43 Source Media Size: 41,874,292,736 bytes
I 17:09:43 Source Media Volume Identifier: BEN_HUR_DISC_1
I 17:09:43 Source Media Volume Set Identifier: 037774BF BEN_HUR_DISC_1
I 17:09:43 Source Media Application Identifier: SonicScenaristBD
I 17:09:43 Source Media Implementation Identifier: SonicScenaristBD
I 17:09:43 Source Media File System(s): UDF (2.50)
I 17:09:43 Read Speed (Data/Audio): 8x / 8x
I 17:09:43 Destination File: C:\Users\User\Desktop\BEN_HUR_DISC_1.ISO
I 17:09:43 Destination Free Space: 188,843,372,544 Bytes (184,417,356.00 KiB) (180,095.07 MiB) (175.87 GiB)
I 17:09:43 Destination File System: NTFS
I 17:09:43 File Splitting: Auto
[B]I 17:09:44 Read Speed - Effective: 3.3x - 7.6x, 7.6x - 3.3x
[/B]I 17:09:48 Reading Session 1 of 1… (1 Track, LBA: 0 - 20446431)
I 17:09:48 Reading Track 1 of 1… (MODE1/2048, LBA: 0 - 20446431)
I 17:37:37 Exporting Graph Data…
I 17:37:37 Graph Data File: C:\Users\User\AppData\Roaming\ImgBurn\Graph Data Files\HL-DT-ST_BD-RE_BH16NS40_1.03_FRIDAY-MAY-9-2014_5-09_PM_N-A.ibg
I 17:37:37 Export Successfully Completed!
[B]I 17:37:37 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 00:27:53
I 17:37:37 Average Read Rate: 24,442 KiB/s (5.6x) - Maximum Read Rate: 33,482 KiB/s (7.6x)
[/B]I 17:49:01 Operation Started!
I 17:49:02 Source Device: [0:0:0] PIONEER BD-RW BDR-208M 1.10 (G:) (SATA)
I 17:49:02 Source Media Type: BD-R
I 17:49:02 Source Media Supported Read Speeds: 8x
I 17:49:02 Source Media Supported Write Speeds: 2x, 4x, 6x, 8x, 10x, 12x, 15x
I 17:49:02 Source Media Sectors: 20,446,432
I 17:49:02 Source Media Size: 41,874,292,736 bytes
I 17:49:02 Source Media Volume Identifier: BEN_HUR_DISC_1
I 17:49:02 Source Media Volume Set Identifier: 037774BF BEN_HUR_DISC_1
I 17:49:02 Source Media Application Identifier: SonicScenaristBD
I 17:49:02 Source Media Implementation Identifier: SonicScenaristBD
I 17:49:02 Source Media File System(s): UDF (2.50)
I 17:49:02 Read Speed (Data/Audio): 8x / 8x
I 17:49:02 Destination File: C:\Users\User\Desktop\BEN_HUR_DISC_1.ISO
I 17:49:02 Destination Free Space: 188,835,569,664 Bytes (184,409,736.00 KiB) (180,087.63 MiB) (175.87 GiB)
I 17:49:02 Destination File System: NTFS
I 17:49:02 File Splitting: Auto
[B]I 17:49:03 Read Speed - Effective: 3.3x - 8x
[/B]I 17:49:04 Reading Session 1 of 1… (1 Track, LBA: 0 - 20446431)
I 17:49:04 Reading Track 1 of 1… (MODE1/2048, LBA: 0 - 20446431)
I 18:17:02 Exporting Graph Data…
I 18:17:03 Graph Data File: C:\Users\User\AppData\Roaming\ImgBurn\Graph Data Files\PIONEER_BD-RW_BDR-208M_1.10_FRIDAY-MAY-9-2014_5-49_PM_N-A.ibg
I 18:17:03 Export Successfully Completed!
[B]I 18:17:03 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 00:27:59
I 18:17:03 Average Read Rate: 24,355 KiB/s (5.5x) - Maximum Read Rate: 33,269 KiB/s (7.6x)[/B]

The LG firmware (I guess?) also seems to have a bug that causes it to report these weird read speeds like 7.6, 4.8, whatever, as options. I don’t know if that means it actually limits the speeds to 7.6 instead of 8, or 8x is only reachable if you have a full BD50 to rip (this one is only 40 out of the 45gb). My suspicion is that the drive actually calculates this top speed number based on its length, which is kind of smart. In any case, I think it’s clear that both drives rip at about the same speed, with any quirks being related to the ripping software. If anything, give the edge to the LG, which doesn’t need any kind of unlock program that may or may not work in order to allow it to rip at full speed.


#92

Excuse me for my insistence, but I’m very puzzled. Maybe I have to search for drives different from the LG and the Pioneer, because I’ve had 2 LG drives (BE14NU40 and a rebadged BH16NS48) and I was NOT content with their ripping speed with this special media.

I have to think if I buy another LG (will the BH16NS40 be better than the NS48? I doubt…) or pull the trigger and buy the Pioneer… or anything else.

Anyway, thank you for your help and patience.


#93

I think you should settle with the LG. You know it works, and even if it doesn’t get any firmware updates, it seemed to work fine for you.

[And it’s a sure buy, instead of the “maybe I get the best drive, maybe not” with the Pioneer drives.]


#94

[QUOTE=HiddenUser;2727164]Excuse me for my insistence, but I’m very puzzled. Maybe I have to search for drives different from the LG and the Pioneer, because I’ve had 2 LG drives (BE14NU40 and a rebadged BH16NS48) and I was NOT content with their ripping speed with this special media.
[/QUOTE]
What special media are you referring to? I’m not sure you’ll find any drives that can do faster than 8x for a regular DL movie :confused:
I was used to ripping BDs are 4x before this, so maybe I’m easier to please, ha :slight_smile:

I have to think if I buy another LG (will the BH16NS40 be better than the NS48? I doubt…) or pull the trigger and buy the Pioneer… or anything else.

Speaking as someone that just spent an inordinate amt of time comparing these drives, I dunno if it’s worth hunting and hunting for a better one, especially just for ripping speed, as opposed to burn speed to or burn quality. I’m not sure why the NS40 would be faster than the NS48 but even if it were, I doubt it would be by very much. I think you mentioned that it took 31 mins to rip a BD using AnyDVD + ImgBurn? That’s in line with my results given that your disc was 5gb bigger. IMHO that’s respectable. I’m just curious what results you’ve come across that make you think there’s a higher-speed option out there :confused:
Oh, and you may be able to crossflash to the NS40 if you were really curious btw - not sure though, maybe cvs or albert could help you there.


#95

Well, well, well… bilditup1, calm down, I was not trying to irritate you. Finally, you convinced me.

I’ve read others reports on the net claiming there are issues with Pioneer writers when reading some BD discs even although the “quiet mode” is disabled. So I discarded any Pioneer and because I need an external drive (to be shared between 2 computers) I’m going to buy this USB 3.0 external enclosure + LG BH16NS40 (NS48 is not available in Europe, save for if it’s a Buffalo BRXL-16U3; I had this drive and returned it because of imposibility of updating it).

I’ve also read that connecting the internal drive directly to the motherboard you can get slightly better speeds, so I can connect it to the mobo occasionally if needed and use the enclosure when using the drive on another computer. In addition, it can be crossflashed to a NS48 and I’ll have more firmware updates than with the external BE14NU40. I think it’s the best of both worlds.

Albert, bilditup1, please tell me if it’s a bad decision.

Thanks


#96

No worries dude :slight_smile:

That sounds like a fine plan to me but I’m no expert, heh


#97

Media: BD-R CMCMAGBA5
Media Mfr: CMC Magnetics
Origin: Taiwan
Brand: Value Disc 6x 50pk, branded
Model: VDBR0560P
Drive: LG BH16NS40 1.03
Speed: 4x

I’ve decided I’ll only be posting TRTs when they aren’t perfect, as perfect tests don’t really tell us very much about anything and they take up a lot of screen real estate. This burn was read at full speed by all four drives of my BD drives - LG GGC-H20L, LT iHBS112, LG BH16NS40, Pioneer BDR-208M.

[B]Disc Quality Scan[/B]

My expectations for this media were higher with this drive, based largely on cvs’ testimony. This looks merely OK. I had originally planned to test at higher burn speeds too - thought better of it just for consistency’s sake with all my previous BD-R burns.


#98

Media: BD-R CMCMAGBA5
Media Mfr: CMC Magnetics
Origin: Taiwan
Brand: Value Disc 6x 50pk, branded
Model: VDBR0560P
Drive: Pioneer BDR-208M 1.10
Speed: 4x

Perfect TRTs at max speeds across the board.

[B]Disc Quality Scan[/B]

Much better BIS result here. Slightly lower jitter. Drive continues its general dominance.


#99

Media: BD-R CMCMAGBA5
Media Mfr: CMC Magnetics
Origin: Taiwan
Brand: Value Disc 6x 50pk, branded
Model: VDBR0560P
Drive: LT iHBS112 2 PL06
Speed: 4x

Perfect TRTs at max speeds across the board.

[B]Disc Quality Scan[/B]

The lowest jitter and LDC count. BIS spike for some reason at 12.5GB. Without it this would be unquestionably the best burn. Solid, and again somewhat surprising result for the oldest drive of the bunch, an ASUS-flavored rebadge.


#100

Media: BD-R MEIT02-001
Media Mfr: Matsushita Electric Inc.
Origin: Japan
Brand: Panasonic 1-4x 50pk, inkjet printable
Model: LM-BRS25LT50
Drive: LG BH16NS40 1.03
Speed: 4x

Somewhat high expectations for these because of the discs’ reputation, its high price, at ~$60 a spindle, and its greater-than two wk shipping time. Used eBay bucks to soften the blow, but still. Let’s see.

Perfect TRTs at max speeds across the board.

[B]Disc Quality Scan[/B]

Very low LDC and lowest jitter I’ve ever seen on any kind or brand of media so far. BIS spikes around 20-21GiB make me sad :frowning:


#101

Media: BD-R MEIT02-001
Media Mfr: Matsushita Electric Inc.
Origin: Japan
Brand: Panasonic 1-4x 50pk, inkjet printable
Model: LM-BRS25LT50
Drive: Pioneer BDR-208M 1.03
Speed: 4x

Perfect TRTs at max speeds across the board.

[B]Disc Quality Scan[/B]

Same low LDC and slightly higher jitter. BIS less spikey. My understanding is that difficult-to-correct errors is a more critical benchmark than uniformity in pit-land sizes (what I understand jitter to measure?), so I’m going to call this the superior burn.


#102

Media: BD-R MEIT02-001
Media Mfr: Matsushita Electric Inc.
Origin: Japan
Brand: Panasonic 1-4x 50pk, inkjet printable
Model: LM-BRS25LT50
Drive: LT iHBS112 2 PL06
Speed: 4x

Perfect TRTs at max speeds across the board.

[B]Disc Quality Scan[/B]

Same low LDC with a couple BIS spikes as the LG burn, but with worse jitter. Bottom of a shallow barrel.


#103

I’ve done a few burns with 6x and will be posting them momentarily.