Lexar P10 64GB Flash Drive

vbimport

#1

Amazon has this for 119.99 and free shipping with Prime. This USB3 is as fast as my old Vertex 2 SSD, over 255mbs read and write. Its a winner, and made to last. I have 2 of these but I bought for a bit less, 95.00 shipped when Lexar had their Black Friday sales.:wink:


#2

The P10 is simply [B][U]AWESOME[/U][/B], and as you said Alan, insanely fast for a flash USB3 drive, you have in your pocket a Vertex2 when ti comes to speed ;).


#3

[QUOTE=vroom;2716121]The P10 is simply [B][U]AWESOME[/U][/B], and as you said Alan, insanely fast for a flash USB3 drive, you have in your pocket a Vertex2 when ti comes to speed ;).[/QUOTE]

Yup, if they made a 128GB of this same caliber, I would buy it in a quick second, I use my 64GB flash drives a lot, I thought that the Lexar Triton was a great deal, but compared to this, its just not up to speed and yes I would also recommend the Triton for people that do not want to spend the money for the P10.



#4

These have a nice speed, but they are about 4x the price of similar usb3 flash drives which range in the 80 - 160mb read speed and 50 - 100mb write speed. I am considering getting one in the $40 range (if for no other reason to justify why I bought a usb3 add-on card real cheap a/r). However, for $120 I could have a 2 or 3tb external usb3 drive.
I might just bide my time until my next system upgrade… still rocking an old S1156 Intel w/ 4gb of ram.
What’s the killer app for these drives? To xfer movies to usb for quick launch on a HDTV? I’m currently using an 4gb drive for readyboost.


#5

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2716164]These have a nice speed, but they are about 4x the price of similar usb3 flash drives which range in the 80 - 160mb read speed and 50 - 100mb write speed. I am considering getting one in the $40 range (if for no other reason to justify why I bought a usb3 add-on card real cheap a/r). However, for $120 I could have a 2 or 3tb external usb3 drive.
I might just bide my time until my next system upgrade… still rocking an old S1156 Intel w/ 4gb of ram.
What’s the killer app for these drives? To xfer movies to usb for quick launch on a HDTV? I’m currently using an 4gb drive for readyboost.[/QUOTE]

There are cheap and fast devices. Sandisk Z80 series is one of them.

It seems Extreme Z80 32GB prices vary greatly as usual. South Korean price is less than 1 USD per GB.


#6

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2716398]There are cheap and fast devices. Sandisk Z80 series is one of them.

It seems Extreme Z80 32GB prices vary greatly as usual. South Korean price is less than 1 USD per GB.[/QUOTE]

What is the build quality like on that Z80 Ken? Because I use my P10 everyday and carry it everywhere, if its plastic its usually history in a few weeks.:wink:


#7

Kenny I searched the web for the Sandisk Z80 64GB and I found it , the cheapest price was 79.00 at B&H Photo and its made of plastic and does not have half the speed of the Lexar P10.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=896419&Q=&is=REG&A=details


#8

[QUOTE=alan1476;2716507]Kenny I searched the web for the Sandisk Z80 64GB and I found it , the cheapest price was 79.00 at B&H Photo and its made of plastic and does not have half the speed of the Lexar P10.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=896419&Q=&is=REG&A=details[/QUOTE]

That’s exactly why I posted the information. Because it’s not well known and because its performance is not well known and becaue its prices are sorta distorted. Samsung SSDs are more than 50% cheaper in the US than in South Korea. Sandisk is a US company yet a Sandisk USB memory stick is cheaper in South Korea.

That a nice, fast, and highly reliable USB 3.0 memory stick could be priced at under US$1 is what counts. Anyone can make one because it’s easy and does not cost millions.

Sandisk Extreme Z80 has been one of the most popular USB 3.0 memory stick products among some users in South Korea. Before its release, a few others lead the USB 3.0 market. Verbatim’s was also good, but not fast. A few manufacturers released SLC-based USB 3.0 sticks, but none of them was cheap enough.

It’s not well known in the US because US consumers rarely need such extreme portability. An iPad Air or MacBook Pro Retina can be as portable while far more powerful.

As for speed, one can always have a USB 3.0 enclosure with almost any 120-128GB SSD inside. There are also unused and used first-generation and second-generation iPad tablets with 64GB SSD inside. In South Korea, 64GB iPad’s selling for about US$120.


#9

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2716604]That’s exactly why I posted the information. Because it’s not well known and because its performance is not well known and becaue its prices are sorta distorted. Samsung SSDs are more than 50% cheaper in the US than in South Korea. Sandisk is a US company yet a Sandisk USB memory stick is cheaper in South Korea.

That a nice, fast, and highly reliable USB 3.0 memory stick could be priced at under US$1 is what counts. Anyone can make one because it’s easy and does not cost millions.

Sandisk Extreme Z80 has been one of the most popular USB 3.0 memory stick products among some users in South Korea. Before its release, a few others lead the USB 3.0 market. Verbatim’s was also good, but not fast. A few manufacturers released SLC-based USB 3.0 sticks, but none of them was cheap enough.

It’s not well known in the US because US consumers rarely need such extreme portability. An iPad Air or MacBook Pro Retina can be as portable while far more powerful.

As for speed, one can always have a USB 3.0 enclosure with almost any 120-128GB SSD inside. There are also unused and used first-generation and second-generation iPad tablets with 64GB SSD inside. In South Korea, 64GB iPad’s selling for about US$120.[/QUOTE]

The Lexar JumpDrive P10 features performance similar to SSDs in the flash drive form factor that makes these types of devices far easier to transport and tote around than portable drives. :wink:


#10

[QUOTE=alan1476;2716636]The Lexar JumpDrive P10 features performance similar to SSDs in the flash drive form factor that makes these types of devices far easier to transport and tote around than portable drives. ;)[/QUOTE]

Perhaps you forgot “USB” means interface standard for storage and “SSD” means chip standard for storage. “Stick” type storage devices are typically far smaller than “drive” type storage devices.

But both traditional USB stick devices and 2.5-inch or 3.5-inch form factor of SSD devices are made of NAND chips. So they are both SSDs.

What makes traditional HDD and SSD devices much bigger and heavier than traditional USB stick devices is density and NAND evolution made density improved.

It should be very much possible to make USB 3.0 devices look more like coins, pencils, mice, credit cards, watchs, or any other things than sticks. The only main components in making portable SSDs are connectors, chips for controlling and storing data, and a board for holding and linking such connectors and chips. Most SSDs of today are based on 2.5-inch form factor not because the chips are too big, but because laptop market segment using only 2.5-inch bay was considered to be the first major target market for the early generations of SSDs. You can make SSDs in 1.8-inch or 1.0-inch form factor.

The Lexar drive is a little faster than average among latest-generation USB 3.0 devices. But it is not the only offering such speeds. My point was it is priced too high for such speeds. The price might have been justified two years ago when there were very few USB 3.0 stick drives in the retail market. I was one of the early users of such drives.

So, is there any reason not to have a US$30 product of similar performance, similar capacity, similar portability, etc.? Just what would have to make such devices so costly to produce?


#11

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2716993]Perhaps you forgot “USB” means interface standard for storage and “SSD” means chip standard for storage. “Stick” type storage devices are typically far smaller than “drive” type storage devices.

But both traditional USB stick devices and 2.5-inch or 3.5-inch form factor of SSD devices are made of NAND chips. So they are both SSDs.

What makes traditional HDD and SSD devices much bigger and heavier than traditional USB stick devices is density and NAND evolution made density improved.

It should be very much possible to make USB 3.0 devices look more like coins, pencils, mice, credit cards, watchs, or any other things than sticks. The only main components in making portable SSDs are connectors, chips for controlling and storing data, and a board for holding and linking such connectors and chips. Most SSDs of today are based on 2.5-inch form factor not because the chips are too big, but because laptop market segment using only 2.5-inch bay was considered to be the first major target market for the early generations of SSDs. You can make SSDs in 1.8-inch or 1.0-inch form factor.

The Lexar drive is a little faster than average among latest-generation USB 3.0 devices. But it is not the only offering such speeds. My point was it is priced too high for such speeds. The price might have been justified two years ago when there were very few USB 3.0 stick drives in the retail market. I was one of the early users of such drives.

So, is there any reason not to have a US$30 product of similar performance, similar capacity, similar portability, etc.? Just what would have to make such devices so costly to produce?[/QUOTE]

Besides great speeds Kenny, it has a great housing, solid, no plastic, it will last for years.


#12

[QUOTE=alan1476;2716995]Besides great speeds Kenny, it has a great housing, solid, no plastic, it will last for years.[/QUOTE]

I’m not saying it’s a bad product. It really is fast and rugged. It’s just that there are many other products that are small and fast enough for most uses. Having several 16GB USB 3.0 devices (costing less than US$10 for each) and two or three 64GB USB 3.0 devices (costing around US$30 for each) should be enough for most. 16GB devices can be used as a booting diskette.

The problem here’s that such a high-priced product’s destined to be short-lived unless the price’s greatly adjusted promptly. A 960GB Crucial SSD costs right now under US$450 at Newegg.com at this moment. That’s under US$30 for 64GB. That 960GB SSD in 2.5-inch form factor is much faster than any 64GB stick form factor (which is really not a standard form factor) on the market. It should be obvious there’d be 128GB USB and Thunderbolt stick products that can write at 300MB/s costing under US$50 if the mass ever want such products. They don’t exist because there’s little demand for such products as consumers are divided into two categories at the moment: those who want portable and disposable sticks ($5 to $10, 4GB to 16GB, small, but not so fast) and those who want compatibility and speed (any price, any capacity, but in the form factors of CF, SD, microSD, etc., with speeds that are required for storing RAW and audiovisual files in real-time.)


#13

The market segments of usb/ultrausb flash drives & SD/SSD cards or drives are distinct markets. There are justifications for each. There’s no reason to think that the low end usb flash drives won’t evolve to higher capacity & faster drives… that’s just the nature of technology (and will be reasonably cheaper & just as disposable).

I think I my mind, I one day see USB flash drives… and for that matter micro-sd flash drives at least attempting to compete in the SSD marketplace with more robust products that overlap the weakest of the SSD product lines. Maybe it’s a fantasy, but it could happen-- maybe it already is… flash drives already are a better value than SSD based on a price per MB/GB of data.


#15

Just to add to the LEXAR P10 it has a lifetime warranty and with that:
The Bitterness of Poor Quality, Lingers Long After the Cheapness of Price, Is Soon Forgotten!