'Less torrent downloads where iTunes and Spotify are available'

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article ‘Less torrent downloads where iTunes and Spotify are available’.

A research company has released information in which countries music is pirated most and also reports on the most pirated songs…

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/less-torrent-downloads-where-itunes-and-spotify-are-available-63859/](http://www.myce.com/news/less-torrent-downloads-where-itunes-and-spotify-are-available-63859/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Arr … so where companies actually provide a service, people use it, rather than illegally downloading. … funny thing that …

I’d further the question … how many illegal downloads are actually simply because people want to put their music on their MP3 player, but they can’t rip it due to CD protection mechanisms and/or the music is not made available as a usable digital download?


#3

I agree debro and how often did I download a music torrent just because I was curious what the music would be like, but would never ever have bought it? I guess that’s about the same as listening to a certain CD in a record store…

Darn, I remember when I wanted to purchase a CD, I had to go to a store, then find a CD, ask an employee to put it in a CD player, then put on headphones and listen if I liked it or not, if not, start over again :wink:


#4

I wonder if Internet speed and mobile Internet also plays a role. :wink:

For example, if I want to listen to a particular song on demand, I go to YouTube, look up the title and click the result. If I’m not interested in watching the video, I just minimise the browser (or switch tab). Same goes with on the move - YouTube App, assuming I’m in an area with 3G coverage. Most of the time, I just listen to FM, DAB or Internet radio, as there are very few recently released songs that I would be interested in listening to on demand.

However, in many countries where iTunes and Spotify are not available, there is generally much tighter Internet caps and worse mobile data coverage & charges. Assuming an Internet connection is quick enough to watch something on YouTube, the data usage would quickly eat up one’s monthly allowance, especially if they listen to multiple songs a day. MP3 downloads on the other hand take far less bandwidth, even if they end up being uploaded multiple times through BitTorrent sharing.

As for listening to music on the move, those in poorer countries either don’t have handsets capable of watching YouTube and those that do probably could not afford the data usage, so the main alternative would be to download the songs before heading out.