Legal qusetion - DVD

vbimport

#1

If it is law that music CDs can be copied for backup why is it not ok to backup your DVDs on a dvd-r? I guess my question is why is copy protection legal? Now dont get me wrong I think that the author should have rights when it comes to not having their stuff illegaly copied, but lets face it DVD get scratched easy, and I dont want to have to go out and buy something again that I bought once already.
I just today got my DVR-104 and love it but dont realy understand why I cant save my favirote DVD before it gets more scratched up. I know I can rip it all to my drive and burn that but I dont fully understand how to do that yet.

I know im repeating myself but I dont understand why I cant just do a DVD to DVD-R copy and all be good.


#2

You are allowed to back up DVD’s onto a blank DVD, as long as you do not descramble them or remove protection.

The problem lies when the DVD’s are decrypted, (usually to convert to Mpeg-4).


#3

can i use clonecd to do it? or do i copy everything to my HD and then burn it to DVD? I tryed to use nero to do a dvd-dvd copy but it wouldnt because it is copywrighted.


#4

cloneCD. not cloneDVD. have you been to www.doom9.org or www.divx-digest.com ? they have ripping tools.


#5

Originally posted by ckin2001
cloneCD. not cloneDVD. have you been to www.doom9.org or www.divx-digest.com ? they have ripping tools.

Yes, but that is illegal. You have to do a file copy, methinks (Am not 100% if this works, I have no DVD-Burner atm)


#6

Why is it illegal to remove the copy protection? I would think as long as you dont alter the product it should be alright. :confused: no? I think it’s your dvd and as long as you dont sell it or give it away what’s the big deal.


#7

It all depends on what country you live in. The copy-protection is considered part of the product in many countries, and as such, if you remove it, you have altered the product, which is illegal.


#8

I realize that my argument is not with you… but when I go to the theater to see a movie it has no copy protection, but then later copy protection is added to protect the product, it is not in itself a part of the product. it would be similar to having a case to protect the product, no one would consider it a breach of copyright to destroy the case, even if there was artwork, etc. on the case.
Just a thought.


#9

but then later copy protection is added to protect the product, it is not in itself a part of the product

Normally, that would be true. However, in the US, there is a law called the “Digital Millenium Copyright Act”, which disallows the removal of protection which “effectively controls access to a copyrighted work”. Since CSS does exactly that, it is illegal to remove it in the US.


#10

Originally posted by 01010110
[B]If it is law that music CDs can be copied for backup why is it not ok to backup your DVDs on a dvd-r? I guess my question is why is copy protection legal? Now dont get me wrong I think that the author should have rights when it comes to not having their stuff illegaly copied, but lets face it DVD get scratched easy, and I dont want to have to go out and buy something again that I bought once already.
I just today got my DVR-104 and love it but dont realy understand why I cant save my favirote DVD before it gets more scratched up. I know I can rip it all to my drive and burn that but I dont fully understand how to do that yet.

I know im repeating myself but I dont understand why I cant just do a DVD to DVD-R copy and all be good. [/B]

Your point is very pertinent, I’m glad I’m not alone to think in those terms. If we are truly prevented for exercising our right to protect our investment by making a backup copy then all h3ll will break loose, so in the end it just won’t happen. Laws that are made form the top down without regard to the deeper implications invariably fail and usually don’t stand a chance in our democracies and only appear to do so for some time in societies governed by what outsiders perceive as being totalitarian.

For a very long time now intellectual property has been protected and any unauthorized copying has been prohibited. This follows moral common sense. But to prevent copying by copy protection mechanism or regulation cannot stand as it goes against the very principle of fair use.

When you buy a book, a record, a game you do not buy a stack of paper and cardboard, a tape of metal oxide or a disc of plastic. You buy essentially pay for the right to use and enjoy its contents, not the material support. This especially true of CDs which are mere material slivers compared to books or tapes. (CDs cost pennies to manufacture).

Now if the material support is damaged in such a way as to make the contents impossible to use and enjoy, then that right is effectively taken away which in effect constitutes a breach license. You would therefore be in your right to demand another copy of the support at actual cost.

Because this would be an administrative nightmare I don’t see how this could happen. Therefore I surmise that any regulation or mechanism that will have a direct effect of preventing fair use will never work, no matter what short-sighted experts’ and erudites’ decree.