Lawmakers look to control MP3 player volume levels

I just posted the article Lawmakers look to control MP3 player volume levels.

European lawmakers hope to force manufacturers to control maximum sound volume on their products.

Read the full article here: [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/20426-lawmakers-look-to-control-mp3-player-volume-levels.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/20426-lawmakers-look-to-control-mp3-player-volume-levels.html)

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Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

There’s a process called evolution of the species… Organisms that are weaker, can not cope with the environmental changes etc do not survive in the long run and are left behind… People that dont have the common sense to protect themselves from harm, and cause permanent acoustic damage by listening to music too loud, probably need to be left behind too… :slight_smile:

What about people like me who applied Replay Gain on all their mp3 files? The maximum volume mandated by our EU overlords would mean that my tracks will sound too low. :rolleyes:

We really should put those lawmakers on the first spaceship destined for the sun…

I came across a little more info on PC Pro not mentioned in the above story.

The maximum volume on MP3 players will be restricted to 80dB, down from the current 100dB. However, manufacturers can provide the ability to let users override the restriction, but only if they present the user with an on-screen warning about the danger of continuous listening to load music, which the user must accept to override the restriction.

So this basically means that users can still turn up the volume if they really want, but only after over-riding the restriction and accepting the health warning.

In my opinion, if they did force the limit at 80dB without the ability to override it, this would only encourage users to buy MP3 players from abroad where the restriction is not in effect or worse still, purchase a headphones amplifier, which can push the audio volume well beyond the current 100dB limitation. :eek:

Another thing: Not all headphones are equally loud.

If you attach “real” quality external headphones to an mp3 player that maxes out at 80 dB on in-ear headphones, the maximum volume will probably be very low.

I really wish lawmakers would stay out of such things and leave it to the consumers to decide such things, but I guess politicians by nature think that everyone else must be treated like children or idiots and cannot be trusted to make any decisions for themselves.

“I really wish lawmakers would stay out of such things and leave it to the consumers to decide such things,…”

I really wish music companies would stop jacking up the loudness on any music and then dynamically compressing it. Talking about taking the volume control out of your hands.

[QUOTE=shaolin007;2442256]I really wish music companies would stop jacking up the loudness on any music and then dynamically compressing it. Talking about taking the volume control out of your hands.[/QUOTE] Yep, me too - we are all victims in the loudness wars!

Bloody hell!!!

I’m 66 years old and Governments are telling me what volume I can listen to music at!!!

auldyin

Just great…how are we supposed to get rid of all the morons if the governments of the world continue to protect them? Seat belts, air bags, check valves on propane tanks, it’s all great if you are in the safety device manufacturing business. I need to invest in Boostaroo (http://www.boostaroo.com). I already bought one since my Zune output is already pathetic at driving anything other than a pair of cheap earbuds.

[QUOTE=Hemispasm;2442183]There’s a process called evolution of the species… Organisms that are weaker, can not cope with the environmental changes etc do not survive in the long run and are left behind… People that dont have the common sense to protect themselves from harm, and cause permanent acoustic damage by listening to music too loud, probably need to be left behind too… :)[/QUOTE]

Eh? can’t hear you mate! :wink:

Remember the 50s when they told you not to set to close to TVs it would hurt your eyes.

[QUOTE=samlar;2442658]Remember the 50s when they told you not to set to close to TVs it would hurt your eyes.[/QUOTE] These days it’s more likely to hurt your brain…regardless of how close you sit. :doh:

[QUOTE=shaolin007;2442256]“I really wish lawmakers would stay out of such things and leave it to the consumers to decide such things,…”

I really wish music companies would stop jacking up the loudness on any music and then dynamically compressing it. Talking about taking the volume control out of your hands.[/QUOTE]

I’ve pretty much stopped buying music because of this nonsense. I stay clear of “remastered” CDs and look for non remastered when I do buy one. It’s really a shame that any gain from remastering get ruined by all of the compression they use. No wonder people think vinyl sounds better than CD.

[QUOTE=steveo119;2442442]Eh? can’t hear you mate! ;)[/QUOTE]LoL :slight_smile:

Really good vinyl sounds better on a high end system than mediocre CD’s. I recently compiled a collection of Brahms MP3’s I collected. Half of the CD is at on volume and the other half is at another volume. Maybe the standard should be on the way the volume is encoded on the CD. You should be able to play it as loud as you want. Who knows, you could be outside at a picnic or headphones that need a little voltage to make them audible.

[QUOTE=Zathros;2443315]Really good vinyl sounds better on a high end system than mediocre CD’s.[/quote] Kinda depens on the original source or how close digital media can reach that. The Beatles were never in a sound studio that used digital systems, but nevertheless their latest cd box sounds pretty great. If Mozart could record a SACD, i think he would.

Good high quality amplification would help alot… its the distortion that causes hearing damage… soooo… give us HIGH quality products to buy an quit shoving low end devices down our throats … You cant get something for nothing…lol