Laptop Partition Help

vbimport

#1

Just recently took our laptop on around the operating systems trip, Windows Vista Home Premium-Windows 7 Pro-Windows 10, BTW the 1607 update unchecked all the boxes in DoNotSpy10. I took away the HDD recovery partition, 8.5 GBs and also another normal. 8-8.5 GBs partition D. My problem is I’m left with this 1.5 GBs partition which was recovery, but now I have made E so that you could see it and I can’t merge it with C. I have tried Windows and AOMEI Partition Assistant Standard, but I’m either missing something or doing something wrong. The 1.5 recovery part is gone and I have formatted that partition, but just can’t get done what I want done.


#2

Delete the ‘E’ and try to expand the ‘C’ by moving the slider between E and C to the beginning with Aomei PA…


#3

I have cloned several hard drives to SSD drives using AOMEI Partition Assistant Standard. i found it generated at least three partitions on the target drive during every cloning session. Be careful what partition you delete as on of them contains the Master Boot Record (MBR). If you delete it or merge it then the computer will not boot. Windows 10 creates a 500 MB partition for the MBR and for some reason AOMEI makes that partition far bigger during the cloning process. I looked at the used space of the partition to make an educated guess about which partition to keep. Typically the MBR has around 300-400 MB of information written to it. If a partition has 100 MB or less or more than 500 MB than it likely isn’t the MBR partition. I resized the MBR partition to be 1 GB even though I could have made it 500 MB. I just didn’t want to push my luck by going down to the default size. So I ended up with a 1 GB system partition and the OS partition was the remainder of the disk space.


#4

You can’t really merge the partition to one that comes before it, at least not with gBurner which is the only such tool I have experienced with. You have to move files from C: to another partition or drive, then delete E: and C: and merge the space together, then copy your data to this new partition.


#5

[QUOTE=roadworker;2781982]Delete the ‘E’ and try to expand the ‘C’ by moving the slider between E and C to the beginning with Aomei PA…[/QUOTE]
That’s what I would do using the Control panel - disk management you can delete the E: partition and then expand C: to take over the entire disk. Using 3rd party software is not a good thing to do there when Windows itself can do it. So you need to look at your control panel - disk management there you will see the full control to resize a partition without the need for their party software.


#6

[QUOTE=UTR;2781987]I have cloned several hard drives to SSD drives using AOMEI Partition Assistant Standard. i found it generated at least three partitions on the target drive during every cloning session. Be careful what partition you delete as on of them contains the Master Boot Record (MBR). If you delete it or merge it then the computer will not boot. Windows 10 creates a 500 MB partition for the MBR and for some reason AOMEI makes that partition far bigger during the cloning process. I looked at the used space of the partition to make an educated guess about which partition to keep. Typically the MBR has around 300-400 MB of information written to it. If a partition has 100 MB or less or more than 500 MB than it likely isn’t the MBR partition. I resized the MBR partition to be 1 GB even though I could have made it 500 MB. I just didn’t want to push my luck by going down to the default size. So I ended up with a 1 GB system partition and the OS partition was the remainder of the disk space.[/QUOTE]

Since beef already formatted that ‘E’ and still can boot windows,I assumed dat either the MBR was already installed on the ‘C’ or his system is UEFI,otherwise he would’ve already had to run boot recovery…:wink:

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2782009]That’s what I would do using the Control panel - disk management you can delete the E: partition and then expand C: to take over the entire disk. Using 3rd party software is not a good thing to do there when Windows itself can do it. So you need to look at your control panel - disk management there you will see the full control to resize a partition without the need for their party software.[/QUOTE]

I beg to differ…while windows disk management is suited for most tasks,some people still prefer bootcd’s to repartition their harddisk,especially if the system partition needs to be altered…:wink:


#7

[QUOTE=roadworker;2782019]Since beef already formatted that ‘E’ and still can boot windows,I assumed dat either the MBR was already installed on the ‘C’ or his system is UEFI,otherwise he would’ve already had to run boot recovery…;)[/QUOTE]C:\ is default by Windows O/S you can’t change that and doing so will prompt Windows to protest this and most likely not boot. This is for Security reason it was made this way-there is no way around this unless your hacking system not yours.

[QUOTE=roadworker;2782019]I beg to differ…while windows disk management is suited for most tasks,some people still prefer bootcd’s to repartition their harddisk,especially if the system partition needs to be altered…;)[/QUOTE]I’ve had to fix problem caused by 3rd party software that caused more problem then it help and then had fix it. Once user are taught how to use this feature they will see how straight forward deleting partition and merging them is far easier to work with. I’ve done this many times and walked those through the setups and they have better sense of how to do and it and remember how to do it.


#8

Well…each to his/her own,but I’d prefer a ‘cold’ system partition edit any time above a ‘hot’ one…:bigsmile:


#9

[QUOTE=roadworker;2782019]Since beef already formatted that ‘E’ and still can boot windows,I assumed dat either the MBR was already installed on the ‘C’ or his system is UEFI,otherwise he would’ve already had to run boot recovery…:wink:
[/QUOTE]

Another way to handle it is to reduce the size of the unwanted partition(s) to the minimum allowed and then remove and drive letter designations. This hides the partition so it can’t be seen and the hit on disk space is minimal.


#10

[QUOTE=roadworker;2782030]Well…each to his/her own,but I’d prefer a ‘cold’ system partition edit any time above a ‘hot’ one…:bigsmile:[/QUOTE]
In this instance this works so it’s not to each his/her own but one that works. But if you do it that way that is your way but don’t tell other to use 3rd party software if they have to pay for them to do something something Windows can do itself already and they can search the net and see how to do it as well.


#11

Thank you all for your replies, they are appreciated. I solved it last night, but could not get back until now. It pays to actually think instead of doing a whole pile of stuff at the same time. I used AOMEI for part, but had to install EaseUS to finish off for some reason. Hopefully I can keep this straight, I have only done it once. I took the C: partition and created another partition D:, deleted E, made the DVD drive E:. Merged the partition that was E: into D:, which created 3 tasks on a reboot, move and resize C:, move and resize D:, then merge the partition that was E: into D:, all preos. All tasks completed, but I got a little worried when on reboot windows went into automatic repair, but survived that. Now AOMEI is supposed to be able to convert logical to primary, but for some reason I did not have that option so I installed EaseUS and finished off. So now I have 2 partitions, C: system, D: extension and DVD drive E:. BTW I will save all this information for future reference, because even although this worked this time, it doesn’t mean it couldn’t be without problems next time.


#12

[QUOTE=aztekk;2782006]gBurner[/QUOTE]

Sorry, meant gParted LiveCD (in case anyone wants to try the program out).

Anyway, glad you got it sorted out.