Kprobe..pI/pO sum settings 1ecc or 8ecc

ive noticed some media tests state you use 8ecc. what is the standard? i assume its 8 right?

why would you want to go to 1?

Originally posted by Jamos
[B]ive noticed some media tests state you use 8ecc. what is the standard? i assume its 8 right?

why would you want to go to 1? [/B]

PI should be summed at 8 ECC (standards are defined based on that)

PO should be summed at 1 ECC (standards are defined based on that)

For sake of similicity, we tell everyone to sum both at 8 (so that all the scans have a common basis for comparison) and take that into account when looking at how bad the PO is. New KProbe version will allow setting both separately.

thanks for the info:

Assumptions: if i run it at 1ecc then get the p0 numbers, then run it at 8ecc and get the p1 numbers then i would have a accurate scan.

but to save time and to compare with others I should just set the sum to 8ecc and the speed at 4x.

any eta on the new version?

It’s just as easy, and probly just as accurate, to just assume a limit of 32 PO at sum-8.

the new version of Kprobe will allow us to set PI at 8 and PO at 1 on the same scan.

But you also need to be aware that these specs are for 1x scanning only. Using the spec at 4x is an assumption on our part that the errors will be higher scanned at 4x than at 1x.

yes i ran some 2x scans on cheaper media and got slightly better results…but the better media didnt make much of a difference at 4x compared to 2x.

The most important fact for me is to know whether there were any PO failures … a PO failure which can cause a CRC error is defined as more than 4 PO errors in 1 ECC block AFAIK.

I do not care about PI that much (might be 32 in 1 ECC block or 280 in 8 ECC blocks) … because PI errors are unlikely to introduce corrupted data.

If you take it to the limit (like ECMA states), you should do 2 scans at 1x … 1 scan for the so-called PI-Sum 8 and 1 scan for the PO-1.

Doing so, you still have to think about the fact that e.g. Audiodev (with their highly-acclaimed CATS system) uses a specially-calibrated drive for measuring.