Kingston ssd v+ and acer aspire impossible

vbimport

#1

hi everybody, i am facing a very difficult problem and would be great if someone could help.
i bought a kingston ssd v+ 128 gb to replace the hd of my acer aspire 9302 but so far is imposible to do. i tried with both windows xp pro and home, also with service pack 2 and 3. i tried slistreaming old sata drivers and new sata drivers. the disk is detected by the bios, but not all the times from windows setup. when it is detected from win set some times it says “disk not available”. if it is available i begin installation and when the system restarts to complete installation it gives an error 0x0000008e. after that if i try to install win again the disk is read but with a capacity of 209 gb !!! and setup says “not available”
the chipset pf the mainbord is NVIDIA GeForce Go 6100
the old hd was sata too but not ssd.

thanks


#2

Welcome aboard :wink:

To me, it looks like a compatibility issue of some sort, a drive communication issue or a faulty SSD. From my experience or working with SSDs, including a Kingston V (not the +), they work just like a HDD.

Just in case it’s a communication issue, could you try removing the SSD and inserting it again.

If you have an external 2.5" HDD case and partitioning software, you could try cloning your existing HDD to the SSD (you may need to reduce the existing partition size first to fit the SSD). If the SSD does not boot up with the cloned image, then it’s possibly a faulty SSD or compatibility issue with the laptop’s SATA controller.

Alternatively if you have a desktop PC, you could test the SSD in it, .e.g disconnect the existing HDD and try going through the Windows XP installation with AHCI or SATA Native mode temporarily switched off in the BIOS. If you get the same issue on the desktop, then it’s most likely a faulty SSD.


#3

Welcome to the forum.
There can be system compatibility problems with some older generation 1 SSD.
Here are some things you can try.
Check for a BIOS update for your system, and if there is one available update the BIOS.
Check in your system BIOS, under SATA, if the SATA modes can be switched from AHCI to IDE, if so, select IDE mode.
XP may be a no go anyway, but when installing Vista, do the following.

At the main install screen, select advanced.
Now select delete partition.
Select the un-partitioned space to install too, this will force Vista to create a new [B]aligned[/B] partition.

If this still fails, it’s unlikely that you will get this particular SSD working on your system, and you may have to consider returning it for replacement with a different type of SSD, preferably with a gen2 SSD such as OCZ Agility or Vertex, or their clones.

Let us know how you get on. :wink:


#4

hi and thanks for the replies,
i have the latest bios. the ssd is 2 generation , its the v+
the problem is even the acronis disc cloning software doesn’t recognize the ssd, it recognizes only the original disc connected via usb in order to clone it.
in the bios there are no settings for sata type, but the disk is detected from the bios.


#5

[QUOTE=eps;2502129]hi everybody, i am facing a very difficult problem and would be great if someone could help.
i bought a kingston ssd v+ 128 gb to replace the hd of my acer aspire 9302 but so far is imposible to do. i tried with both windows xp pro and home, also with service pack 2 and 3. i tried slistreaming old sata drivers and new sata drivers. the disk is detected by the bios, …
thanks[/QUOTE]

I’m having similar problems with as Acer Aspire E360 and a Kingston V+ SSD.

Did you find a solution?


#6

[QUOTE=mycmhe;2608140]I’m having similar problems with as Acer Aspire E360 and a Kingston V+ SSD.

Did you find a solution?[/QUOTE]

Yo mycmhe-

What Operating System are you running? Which version of Acronis True Image are you using?


#7

[QUOTE=bigmike7;2608164]Yo mycmhe-

What Operating System are you running? Which version of Acronis True Image are you using?[/QUOTE]

XP Pro – which runs erratically (e.g., reboots) when the SSD drive is present.

Prior to adding the drive, I created and formatted an NTFS partition on the SSD using a different computer. The file system contains no data – so the SSD should just appear as an empty 96GB drive.

But there are problems even before booting XP: The BIOS sometimes shows the correct size of the SSD (96GB), but sometimes shows a wildly incorrect size (many terabytes). Also, the BIOS “auto-detect” function, when selected, always hangs up (apparently indefinitely) even when the correct size is shown. (In both cases, the BIOS shows the correct name and model of the SSD, so at least that is working).

The BIOS has the latest firmware; and the latest Window XP SATA drivers (from Acer) are installed. However SlimDrivers reports newer SATA drivers are available, apparently from elsewhere, which I’m reluctant to try, especially given the erratic BIOS reporting.

The cabling looks good (SATA connections are easy).

I’m not using Acronis True Image, as I plan to do a clean install of XP on the SSD drive (and end up with a dual-boot system).


#8

Yo mychme-

OK - first off - I own a V+ 100 - 96gig Kingston SSD - and believe me - they don’t play nice with Windows XP (any version) mainly due to the Trim feature inherent in the Kingston V+ SSD. Windows 7 is really the only way to go with this SSD - IMO. This allows you to use the Trim feature within the SSD’s firmware and the Win7 OS to keep the drive defragmented.


#9

[QUOTE=bigmike7;2608205]Yo mychme-

OK - first off - I own a V+ 100 - 96gig Kingston SSD - and believe me - they don’t play nice with Windows XP (any version) mainly due to the Trim feature inherent in the Kingston V+ SSD. Windows 7 is really the only way to go with this SSD - IMO. This allows you to use the Trim feature within the SSD’s firmware and the Win7 OS to keep the drive defragmented.[/QUOTE]

This is my third Kingston SSD drive – and I buy them explicitly because they are designed to work well with XP. From the Kingston datasheet:

[I]SSDNow V+100 feature an independent garbage collection function that maintains a system at optimum performance level. This is especially important for systems running on Windows XP, which doesn’t feature TRIM, …[/I]

So far, my experience (one on a Lenovo Thinkpad, and the other on a Dell Optiplex, both running XP) has been good. Both systems run significantly faster, and at least so far (more than 6 months on the Thinkpad), I haven’t noticed any slowdown over time. I don’t defragment the drives for reasons described here: http://http://www.micro-isv.asia/2010/12/never-defragment-an-ssd/

But, as previously mentioned, the problems with this third drive (on the Acer E360) occur [I][B]before[/B][/I] Windows is loaded. The BIOS sometimes reports the correct size for the drive, and sometimes the wrong size. Also, the BIOS hangs up when the auto-detect function is selected.


#10

Can you change the SATA cable?
If so, replace it as this has all the hallmarks of a badly connecting SATA cable.


#11

[QUOTE=Dee;2608246]Can you change the SATA cable?
If so, replace it as this has all the hallmarks of a badly connecting SATA cable.[/QUOTE]
Thanks for the suggestion. After changing the cable (and the SATA port), the BIOS stopped (occasionally) reporting the wrong disk size. but Windows still does not recognize the drive. Also, no improvement after trying several suggestions from level 2 Kingston support. The current status is that I’ll try the drive in a different computer, and Kingston will check their records for possible issues with the Acer Aspire E360.