Judge rules RIAA cant have unlimited access to users PC

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Judge rules RIAA cant have unlimited access to users PC.

DamnedIfIknow used our news submit to tell us that the RIAA has
suffered a blow at the hands of the legal system. The RIAA wanted to be able to
have unlimited access to a hard drive of…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/11640-Judge-rules-RIAA-cant-have-unlimited-access-to-users-PC.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/11640-Judge-rules-RIAA-cant-have-unlimited-access-to-users-PC.html)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Funny how she offered her computer to be examined at first and now they changed their minds… RIAA should have taken her up the first time around…


#3

Perhaps they wised up and realized that the RIAA is so desperate that they would have planted evidence on the system. Better to have a 3rd party look into it.


#4

Tanya suddenly remembered those bathtub photos of Kylee?


#5

If they were to inspect their hard drive, one drive examinist wouldnt be sufficient, you would need multiple people to verify the contents without any RIAA bribes included to them. Then if they find any music they will have to compare the filename to the file name that was downloaded then the byte size of the file to make sure it wasnt planted there and most of all the time stamp on the deleted file.


#6

because the RIAA are so slow at this i would have bought a new hard disk by now installed a legit copy of windows and physically destroy and bury the original, then they can search all the want on the new disk :d


#7

Yeah, but this ruling only affects this one case. For everyone else, the RIAA will have unlimited access to their drives because future music releases will have a “phone home” feature. :d


#8

I agree, I would have installed a new drive and a new copy of Windows… I actually have a spare 40 gig drive lying around, I would have popped that in there… My only concern is that they would know when the Windows operating system was installed, so you would need to have a backup drive and an old backup image of a fresh Windows install… Or install Windows now and pop the drive in later…


#9

All she would have to do is either a) keep her files in an encrypted partition or b) remove the files and use a utility to remove the entries out of the file system table as well as another utility to do a 3-pass wipe of the data sectors. There are no forensics capable of recovering files from areas that have been wiped (that’s why the DoD uses the 3-pass wipe system internally). Without the smoking gun, the RIAA doesn’t have a case. They are relying on extortion or the hopes of winning a case on circumstantial evidence (like IP logs which I can tell you are not 100% accurate and cannot be assumed as “clean” and untampered with). Same goes with the HD…a 3rd party must analyze the HD at the residents home, otherwise the RIAA could have planted the evidence.


#10

Um, that ruling wouldn’t even be necessary in Canada. Privacy Act.