Judge: RIAA appeal in file sharing case refused

vbimport

#1

:cop::cop::cop::cop:

"The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)'s appeal in the Jammie Thomas case has been denied, which could bring the long legal case to a rather anticlimactic end.

U.S. District Judge Michael Davis originally threw out the verdict a few weeks after a jury found her guilty of copyright infringement when she was offering more than 1,700 songs in her shared folder. The jury ultimately forced Thomas to pay up to $220,000 to the record labels, though that ruling was thrown out by Judge Davis."

The rest of the article can be found by clicking here.

What say you?


#2

"The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)'s appeal in the Jammie Thomas case has been denied, which could bring the long legal case to a rather anticlimactic end.

U.S. District Judge Michael Davis originally threw out the verdict a few weeks after a jury found her guilty of copyright infringement when she was offering more than 1,700 songs in her shared folder. The jury ultimately forced Thomas to pay up to $220,000 to the record labels, though that ruling was thrown out by Judge Davis."

The rest of the article can be found by clicking here.

What say you?[/QUOTE]

What I say is the RIAA’s heads seem to get bigger each time they file a new lawsuit, and a judge throwing out a case is a good thing for us! :bigsmile:

I hate it too!


#3

Considering the RIAA’s tactics over the past years I am glad they got slapped down. It looks like their abuse of the legal system is quickly coming to an end and all they have to show for it is a public relations disaster. Their recent decision to stop the filing of mass numbers of lawsuits looks to me to be more a case that they knew the end of their abusive strategy was near. I hope the pendulum swings back at them and they get sued by the very people they dragged into court or extorted money from in settlements.


#4

UTR I think that is coming why else would they try to dimiss those cases they file against john/jane doe plantiffs. The ISP and colleges are standing up to them and that doesn’t look good to them considering nowdays the broadband is growing and growing. You can’t stop growth and going against is like going against the tide of water it keeps coming and coming.


#5

coolcolors, I think their abuse of the legal system has finally been recognized by the courts. The first few cases that finally went to trial highlighted how flimsy the evidence was that they based these cases on. The Harvard professor that is suing them is another nail in their coffin. If I understand it right, he claims the RIAA is acting as a prosecutor and they are basing all their cases on criminal law and not civil law. Only the government can use criminal law to drag citizens into court. If he wins his case then the RIAA may be wide open to a barrage of lawsuits from the people they have extorted money from. Before this ends I think the strategy they used in the USA will be seen as one of the biggest legal blunders in modern times. Record companies have been screwing their customers and artists for decades and as far as I am concerned they are reaping what the have sown. Plus, no matter what they do to prevent piracy their will be a work around to it in a week’s time. IMO, they need to think in terms of mass marketing their products for a cheap price. Make the acquisition of music so easy and cheap that no one will bother with the hassles of piracy. In the end I think they will make far more money doing this.


#6

True True, UTR but when have they ever done the right thing??? LMAO They are more concern about their pocket books. Until those people are tossed into the streets and newer thinking managements come into play will they ever profit or repair the PR distater they created.


#7

I agree. Until the music industry purges the dinosaurs that run it not much will change and their revenues will continue to slide.