Joining AVI files with Different Video Data (Bit) Rates

vbimport

#1

Basically, I have a bunch of AVI files that are encoded with DivX or XVid that I would like to join as one single file.

Using Virtualdub, I tried to append the video files, but it returned with an error stating that the video files could not be joined because each had different video data (bit) rate.

Prior to doing this, I had extracted the audio to an uncompressed WAV in Vitualdub using Full Processing Mode. I then created a new AVI file using a Direct Stream of the original video file for the video source and using the Uncompressed WAV file as the audio source. This resulted in an AVI file with DivX or XVid encoding + Uncompressed PCM Audio. So I know it’s not the audio bit rate that is causing the error message.

Can anyone suggest a method to standardize the video data (bit) rate for AVI files?

I’m trying to prep a bunch of anime episodes for burning onto a DVD, but I’m not sure if it’s better to:

A) Merge multiple episodes into one large file OR

B) Prep each file individually and place them onto the DVD to be played sequentially

Any help or comments would be appreciated.

If I don’t need to merge multiple files, then I wouldn’t need to address the problem of appending files with different video rates.

When authoring a DVD-Video disc, do you need one single large file or can you input multiple files? If I can input multiple files, it would not be necessary to join the files in the first place and therefore I can save myself the headache and encode each video file individually.

Anyhow, if anyone has experience or suggestions, your input is welcome.


#2

Some apps that will encode to MPEG1 or 2 for VCD or DVD will convert multiple formats and give you mpeg as the final. I think Nero my do this for you.


#3

I’ve added up to 30 separate Mpeg2 files to the Tsunami DVD Authoring Program without any problems and if for any reason the Mpeg2 files have been encoded incorrectly it gives suggestions as to what is wrong with them, but I’ve never tried with DivX or XVid though.


#4

Okay guys… Thanks for the suggestions.

But I have found out that I don’t need to combine my AVI files into one large file in order to author a DVD-Video disc.

So, what I’ve done is this:

  • Serve the AVI file via a frameserver with VirtualDub
  • Prep the video for DVD usage (M2V/MPG) using TMPGEnc Plus 2.5
  • Create a multi track DVD-Video disc using TMPGEnc DVD Author
    ---- > Basically I can add as many tracks as I want until it fills the maximum allowable space

So I’ve been able to fit up to 3 episodes per DVD with fantastic quality!


#5

I have found out that I don’t need to combine my AVI files into one large file in order to author a DVD-Video disc.

So, what I’ve done is this:

  • Serve the AVI file via a frameserver with VirtualDub (require some filters before hand)

  • Prep the video for DVD usage (M2V) using TMPGEnc Plus 2.5 by streaming the served AVI file and encoding it to a M2V video file Takes 1 hour for 25-30 minute video

  • Save the audio as uncompressed PCM CBR WAV via VirtualDub, then transcode that audio to Dolby Digital Audio using Scenarist (AC3) Takes about 5 minutes to encode 25-30 minutes of audio

  • Now that I’ve got the Video Source (M2V) and the Audio Source (AC3), I can put things to motion

  • Create a DVD-Video disc using TMPGEnc DVD Author by adding tracks to the compilation, ensuring each track has a correpsoding video source and audio source as follows:

Track 1:
Video 01.m2v + Audio 01.ac3

Track 2:
Video 02.m2v + Audio 02.ac3

---- > Basically I can add as many tracks as I want until it fills the maximum allowable space

So I’ve been able to fit up to 3 Ghost in the Shell episodes per DVD with fantastic quality!

I’ve followed this guide very closely:
http://www.martinchris23.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/divx_to_dvd.htm