Is this taking a photo with your phone a danger

vbimport

#1

A new danger for phone user’s that take picture with their phone


#2

Good info Doug. I will keep this in mind.


#3

That is pretty terrifying.:eek:
Thanks for sharing


#4

I’m surprised how long it took for this to become news, as I remember posting an example of this a few years ago here, where I took a picture of an owl show and then showed a street view picture from the GPS details in the photo.

Besides phones, many cameras also have GPS geotagging built in, so worth checking your camera.

On the other hand, the setting does come in handy when on holiday, e.g. if you’ve a few photos that you can’t recall where they were taken, just pop the photo’s GPS details into Google maps. :slight_smile:


#5

@ Seán , I wanted to see if I could get the GPS information from a photo.
I did find a sample one on the internet I could use.
I suspect that club.myce filters the EXIF of photos posted.
Neither of yours’ in the link you posted have EXIF information.
I think that is how it should be.

If I’m not correct & the photos you posted do show location.
What do you use to view it ?

As far as I can tell my digital camera doesn’t add GPS information.
My cell phone doesn’t have a camera but I’m going to update it soon to one that does.
I will be checking it as well.


#6

It looks like the forum strips the EXIF info when it resizes the image as it was over 97KB.

This is that owl picture linked with the IMG tag (instead of attached), so it should still have the EXIF tags with the GPS coordinates:

The GPS details are in the image properties in the details tab:



#7

Worked fine. Thanks
This is the Irfanview info:
GPS information: -
GPSVersionID - 2.2.0.0
GPSLatitudeRef - N
GPSLatitude - 54 39 17
GPSLongitudeRef - W
GPSLongitude - 8 6 36
GPSAltitudeRef - Sea level
GPSAltitude - 101.50 m


#8

For anyone curious to see this in action, these coordinates converted to decimal are 54.65472N, 8.11W.

Paste “54.65472N, 8.11W” into Google maps and zoom in until you see the green position arrow. Click this green arrow and click ‘Street View’. Turn around until you see the castle - that’s very close to where I was standing when I took the photo.


#9

The EXIF viewer I found doesn’t even require you to leave the image page…



#10

People didn’t already know this?

This was a highlighted issue back when iPhones first introduced gps into the phones 3-4 years ago.

Given apples attitude towards tracking users “by accident”, but the “tracking bug” was patented by Apple prior to introduction, I’m surprised that people will leave their gps on.

Btw, Google isn’t any different. The difference is that they have a “don’t be evil” policy, whereas apple/Facebook/linked in have a policy of selling you out to everyone for a dollar…


#11

On that Nokia I had (model 5800 XpressMusic), geotagging was on by default. On my current phone (Android based Sony Xperia Ray), Geotag was off by default.

One thing I am surprised is that phones and GPS-enabled cameras don’t give an automatic Geotag option, i.e. a setting where geotagging is automatically enabled while outside of the home country or a certain mileage from the home county/city.

For example, if the phone’s home location is set to Ireland, photos will only be geotagged if the GPS coordinates are outside of the country, such as while on holiday where geotagging is actually useful and without the risk of forgetting to switch it back off when returning home.

I also remember hearing a similar issue in the early days of Satnavs, as a stolen Satnav could be used to find the owner’s house (i.e. choosing ‘Take me Home’), since since anyone who could afford a Satnav likely had other valuable stuff at their home. The workaround to avoid this was to set the Satnav’s home location to an easy to get to location (e.g. local supermarket), so this way the user can still use the ‘Take me home’ feature without someone being able to use the Satnav find the owner’s home.


#12

I know on my phone, Google Now can learn where you might consider “home” and “work”; it was fairly accurate for me. Only shortly after my phone received the update enabling Google Now, it had pegged my dorm as “home” and the building where I had most of my classes as “work”. Zoom in enough on Google Maps, and I’m sure you could have figured out the room I was in during the semester [I actually tried it and it pin-pointed the room fairly well!].

For reasons other than security, I keep GPS off more often than I enable it, but all it takes is one or two moments of enabling it for that kind of software to figure out where you most frequently are. Luckily, since I keep GPS off, the camera application frequently resets itself to not save location information as a setting that persists until the next time I force it on. But since it only takes one or two snaps to get the relevant information, it doesn’t matter much, does it?

Thing is, I know all of this location tagging is going to happen; I just never expect it to be as precise and accurate as it really is.


#13

I have to realize that almost anything has become dangerous.
Last time I was in danger when I took picture of the King’s Palace in Madrid. The guard was running after me. I told him that I am a hetero, but I am ok for a coffee. He could not stop lauging and let me go… With my picture …[U][/U]


#14

I do believe nude pics can be particularly dangerous. For proof, [CLICK HERE](Updated version info: 3.1.6.0 released)!!!


#15

I call I talk or they call I listen do not take pictures, text, or internet on my phone, one computer nerd that is not a phone nerd.


#16

Same Here. :smiley: Every once in a while, I’ll send or receive a text, but I generally prefer to talk face-to-face (that is, without a phone).


#17

I once showed a colleague that i could check on his wife’s whereabouts because she had a google account on her smartphone. He was not amused.