Is Star-Force CD-Cops in disguise?

Consider the following similarities unique ONLY to these two copy-protection systems:

  1. They both require a key to be extracted from a batch of CDs which is then entered by the user.

  2. The key only works with original CDs.

  3. You need a new key for each batch (Because the angle changes I think)

In Windows NT / 2000 / XP, Star-Force uses an auto-install driver.

We know that 98 / ME have Adaptec’s ASPI drivers, used for advanced CD reading.

NT / 2000 / XP don’t have these ASPI drivers, so to use their features, Star-Force would need to install them.

Somehow though, they have made it more effective because there aren’t as many problems as there were with CD-Cops.

Also, the same protection used by Star-Force Professional is used in Star-Force CDR. Physical angle checking can be used on both CDR’s and Pressed Silver CDs.

Also, there is a CDR version because unlike other protections, physical angle (CD-Cops style protection) checking would work on any CD Recorder regardless of what modes / options it supported.

Is Star-Force just CD-Cops, but more accurate?

Yes!, check the manufacturers website and you´ll see that Star Force is just a rip off of CD-Cops and has been tangled with in Russia.

> Physical angle checking can be used on both
> CDR’s and Pressed Silver CDs. Also, there is a
> CDR version because unlike other protections,
> physical angle (CD-Cops style protection)
> checking would work on any CD Recorder
> regardless of what modes / options it supported.

Blah, the same bullshit has been propagating for
quite some time now ; for your information CD
drives simply cannot measure angles between
sectors. Just use your common sense : if the lens
is not parallel to the disc, how do you think the
reflected laser could be picked up ?

spath, that, is rubbish.

It is possible spath, by measuring the seek times for sectors in the same ring of the CD.

It is possible, you don’t have to do anything fancy reader wise. With a few calculations based on sector seek times, you can measure the physical angle between first and last sector on the disc reasonably accurately.

> With a few calculations based on sector seek
> times, you can measure the physical angle
> between first and last sector on the disc
> reasonably accurately.

First, you apparently ignore the difference between
‘calculating’ and ‘measuring’ (some english courses
could help you on that) : what you are trying to
claim is that you measure seek times, and from
them calculate an angle.

Second, you also seem to ignore that seek time
durations depend on a lot of parameters and
therefore can vary a lot in time (by the way, since
all drives don’t have the same seek speed, I would
like to know how you obtain the same angle with
every drive ?)

Now, why don’t you post here these ‘few
calculations’ to backup your claims ?

  1. “Calculate” the physical angle then if you really want.

  2. Durations do depend on parameters but you just don’t get it:

The nature of the calculation compares the seek times for two sectors, the actual time for a sector seek, 8 Milliseconds or 10 minutes, doesn’t matter.

As long as the two sectors are measured in the same way under the same conditions, the angle can be accurately calculated.

  1. No, because I only know the general principle.

However I imagine it could be done like so:

Starting from the first sector, seek the last sector, going the “long” way round the CD.

Let’s call this: L

At the end sector, seek the first sector, the CD will continue rotating a little until the first sector is reached.

Lets call this: S

L + S must equal the time taken to seek from one sector, spin the CD right round and come back to that sector.

Lets call this: T

Therefore S / T gives the distance from the first to the last sector as a proportion of the total.

Lets call this: D

Then do D * 360 to give you the angle.

I have probably made a mistake here, but in the end I don’t really care. I just know for a fact that it can be done and that it has been done.

Yes, there are a lot of complications to putting this into practise, but CD-Cops manages it. Although it had more compatability problems than most and with the right media, could be fooled.

> 2. Durations do depend on parameters but you
> just don’t get it: The nature of the calculation
> compares the seek times for two sectors, the
> actual time for a sector seek, 8 Milliseconds or
> 10 minutes, doesn’t matter.

Sorry, but although I find you method pretty nice, it
still depends on seek times, because in your
calculation of T these will decide whether the disc
has accomplished 1,2,3,x revolutions, and whether
you have taken the long or the short way from a
sector to the other.

> I have probably made a mistake here, but in the
> end I don’t really care. I just know for a fact that it
> can be done and that it has been done.

Hmm, since you cannot explain the actual method,
I also assume nobody has explained it to you
either, so you are basically trusting someone else
on this. Therefore , you will understand that what
you ‘know for a fact’ is just a theory to me.

Now I won’t keep arguing with you on this without
technical facts, so let me propose a summary for
this discussion : we agree that drives cannot
measure a physical angle between two sectors,
but you are fully convinced that CDcops calculates
one between first and last sectors based on seek
times measures. Fair enough ?

Sort of agreed.

Basically, I think that CD-Cops & Star-Force uses this method because the theory sounds plausible and is the only method that would explain everything about the way it behaves. Or at least, I cannot think of any other method that would explain it.

No I can’t explain fully how it works so I’ll accept for now that you are not convinced.

If you have any other theories I’d be interested to hear them.

The whole point of CD-Cops (if my idea is to be believed) is that the angle is calculated based on seek times. You cannot measure the angle, but I am pretty sure that using the forumula would work)

For the meantime I can’t explain all the details so I’ll leave it there.a

The physical angle on a pressed disc can be measured (and therefore the representation of angles on a CD-R(W) can also be measured; it’s related to duffusion & diffraction…I’m going to go back to my research sites and get a simple explanation for you.

Remember that binary data (1s & 0s) are represented by the transition from pit to land & vice versa, not the pit or land itself. It’s the change in light values that are measured.

I guess you guys have never tried to backup CD-Cops protected discs.

In 99% of the cases the backup won’t work, or will only work in a few drives.

the last % depends on:

Very important what media you use.
Write speed and writer.
Read speed and reader.
Even if you have the right reader and writer and correct media I doubt that it will work in every drive.

I got a partially working backup this way:

Read with plextor 12X writer @ 4X and read both subchannels.
Wrote with the same plextor 12X writer @ 8X with “don’t repair subchannel data” checked.
I used Kodak 74min silver+gold 12X media.

This copy would work in toshiba DVD-ROM’s and Afreey CD-ROM’s and my mitsumi CR-4804TE writer, but it did not work in lite-on drives, pioneer drives, AOpen drives and plextor drives. No other drives tested yet.

I’ve probably wasted over 30 discs trying to backup CD-Cops protected discs…

Used more than 10 different CD-R media also.

CD-Cops 1.84 and CD-Cops 2.04…I think that was the two versions I’ve.

What games are protected with the new version of CD-Cops?

Those games I’ve is two Norwegian games.

Flåklypa Grand prix and flåklypa grand prix add-on.

I have one CD-Cops protected game here called ‘Traitors Gate’. It uses CD-Cops version 1.64. After some tries I successfully patched it with McLallo’s CD-Cops decrypter (CloneCD failed). Unfortunatelly this tool is rather outdated and doesn’t seem to work for a lot of games.

@ G@M3FR3@K

Off Topic:

On traitors gate, how do you get past the part where you have to shoot a window with the Ninja Rope, right next to the historical sign that tells you about the building?

btw My version of Traitors Gate has LaserLok.

Did they change protections mid-way through the production of the game?

Spath, maybe it’s time YOU USE YOUR COMMON SENSE!

Do you expect us to be able to explain how the protection works in exact terms, measurements, and all the little details? (Un)fortunately, we do not work for MacroVision or any of those other companies that develop protections such as CD-COPS. The scientists that DO work there can explain how it works (after all they are paid for it) but none of us at CD Freaks are part of a Research and Development team for a protection developer (I hope :wink: )