Internet Explorer 9

vbimport

#1

My son downloaded a contaminated programme from the internet, so now my IE9 isn’t working any more. Every time I try to open it, it automatically closes down again. After that I get messages that Windows Explorer is closed down because of failure and reopened again. Als some of the files of IE9 are missing. Google Chrome, as well as my email, are working as usual.
Any advise would be most welcome. :confused:


#2

This sounds like behavior typical of “hijacker viruses” where a User “loses rights” to access certain programs. Sometimes, standard anti-virus scans are effective, but other times additional steps (and fixes) are required, like using Malwarebytes’ anti-virus to isolate this one particular virus because it’s probably cloaked itself from an already-running AV on your system.

When I have another computer available, I usually visit BleepingComputer to see if they have encountered this particular behavior/virus, and what their recommended steps are.

It’s often a two-step process: run RKILL which halts operating viruses, and then MALWAREBYTES which may disinfect the system. Not very complicated but getting those programs takes some time to download and install on the infected computer.

IF this is a virus, by the way, I would disinfect the system before attempting to ‘fix’ IE9. It’s available for download-and-install by itself, so any damaged or missing files can be re-installed, or update it to IE10.


#3

Thank you for your quick reply. I will try to fix it using your tips.


#4

I didn’t ask if you could burn CDs-DVDs, but I’ll assume “yes”. One thing I have started doing is collecting the “bootable anti-virus CDs” from various vendors. Most of them can be downloaded in an ISO format, meaning “I can get my CD burner to burn that ISO, and it will create the Bootable Segment itself.”

I am not advocating or recommending any one vendor here, by the way. “Your actual mileage may vary” should be the common excuse, because your equipment, any virus (if there is one) and the current AV-version all have factors in success or failure.

And “failure” may be merely “did not detect”, which may not mean “no virus” but ONLY means “this product couldn’t detect it”. So, I tend to use more than one.

AVG has one for free download.

Panda has one.

Kaspersky has one but it seems like it needs an existing Kaspersky installation first.

BLEEPING COMPUTER will have many other suggestions, too. Some of those hijacker viruses are sooo devious and evil. Best of luck, and obviously the best thing would be “no virus at all”.


#5

Hey Christine , Thanks for the RKILL tip. A new tool for my avir programs.
So far I only ran it in normal & it didn’t actually find or stop much.
I consider that good.
It did stop my DVDRAMSV.exe but I wasn’t planing on using any DVD RAM discs today any way .
The one thing it found that I’m looking into is : DFSR [Missing Service]

It did find :

  • C:\Windows\System32\drivers\imapi.sys [NoSig]

  • C:\Windows\System32\drivers\redbook.sys [NoSig]
    Why those aren’t signed I have no idea. I don’t believe this is a problem.

The RKILL.txt was short so I think I’m OK.
I may give it a try in Safe mode . That’s where I like to run occasional avir scans anyway.


#6

[QUOTE=coisdiesel;2685797]My son downloaded a contaminated programme from the internet, so now my IE9 isn’t working any more. Every time I try to open it, it automatically closes down again. After that I get messages that Windows Explorer is closed down because of failure and reopened again. Als some of the files of IE9 are missing. Google Chrome, as well as my email, are working as usual.
Any advise would be most welcome. :confused:[/QUOTE]

Which O/S are you using? I am going to guess you have either Vista or Windows as XP only use IE8. You need to boot into “Safe Mode” with F8 key with networking and see if IE9 works. And if not you will need to redownload IE9 again and reinstall it. But if you can boot to safe mode uninstall IE9 and then reinstall IE9 and then reboot and see if you can get IE9 back. And then make a standard user account and password protect your admin account so your son can’t download and install malware/virus onto you computer without your permission. That way he can get the internet and go to sites but will not be able to install or run programs without you typing the admin password to install that way you have control of what is installed.