Intel's reveals new "upgradeable" processors: pay to unlock power

Intel’s reveals new “upgradeable” processors: pay to unlock power.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/09/10ubY6.jpg[/newsimage]It has been revealed that Intel is testing a new “service” in select markets that will allow customers to upgrade their processors – at least that’s what the company is calling it. 


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/intels-reveals-new-upgradeable-processors-pay-to-unlock-power-34512/](http://www.myce.com/news/intels-reveals-new-upgradeable-processors-pay-to-unlock-power-34512/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

It will fail as AMD will offer a competing CPU that would be as fast as the unlocked Intel one, but at the same price.

If Intel offers the CPU to builders like Dell and Gateway at a reduced price, then that savings can be passed on to consumers, and Intel gets the extra cash if the buyer decides to unlock the CPU. It’s actually not a bad idea and saves Intel the money it would spend making multiple versions of CPUs. So you could look at it as a way to get a cheaper PC with more performance potential that you pay for if you want it.

That said, it could also backfire.

It WILL backfire!
Selling crippled hardware is a load of BS. I will just buy AMD in that case.

[QUOTE=The Scourge;2545757]It WILL backfire!
Selling crippled hardware is a load of BS. I will just buy AMD in that case.[/QUOTE]

Intel and AMD sells crippled hardware and have been doing it for a long time. Us overclockers have known this for decades. Most times the only difference between CPUs of the same model line at lower and higher clock speeds is the multiplier Intel and AMD programs into them at the factory. In fact, most low end CPUs sold today can be overclocked to run faster than the top of the line CPUs in the same product line. I have a lowly Intel E3400 I bought for $39 at Microcenter running at 4.0ghz and it could probably run even faster if I wanted to tweak it some more.

The problem I see with this for Intel is that the upgrade process will be cracked and then anyone can have a fast CPU for free. AMD has tried crippling quad core CPUs down to dual cores. Then motherboard manufacturers programmed their BIOSs to unlock all the cores in the dual core variants. Today, a person can buy a $90 Phenom II X2 555 Black Edition processor, unlock the disabled cores and have the equivalent of their top of the line quad core CPU for a song. Intel will suffer a similar fate if they go with this plan.

[QUOTE=UTR;2545780]
AMD has tried crippling quad core CPUs down to dual cores. Then motherboard manufacturers programmed their BIOSs to unlock all the cores in the dual core variants. Today, a person can buy a $90 Phenom II X2 555 Black Edition processor, unlock the disabled cores and have the equivalent of their top of the line quad core CPU for a song. Intel will suffer a similar fate if they go with this plan.[/QUOTE]

That is not always the case, they can not all be unlocked some can and some can’t
for instance I have the Phenom II X3 720 triple core CPU and when I try to unlock
the 4th core the system will absolutely refuse to boot into Windows and I have to
go and pull the battery out and reset the BIOS before it will do anything at all.

The BIOS sees the 4th core just fine during post it shows up as a Phenom II X4 but
it was crippled for a reason the 4th core is just a non functional core or other words
"it no work-e" :sad:

I bought it knowing the chances of it maybe not unlocking the 4th core and I have no
regrets what-so-ever in buying it. It is the Black Edition and has the unlocked multiplier
so I can overclock it all I want too up to its limit which is around 4 GHz on air but it do
run hot with the extra voltage. :eek:

I usually run it around 3.2GHz for everyday use on stock voltage I might just water-cool
it someday and see just how far I can push it. :iagree:

It sounds to me like this scheme was conceived by the marketing department at AMD! :doh:

It’s not a new thing that a piece of hardware has more in it than the users sees. There are various unlocking methods, from firmware giving you a better writing speed, to region changes.

I guess there will also be an unofficial unlocker. :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2545803]It’s not a new thing that a piece of hardware has more in it than the users sees. There are various unlocking methods, from firmware giving you a better writing speed, to region changes.

I guess there will also be an unofficial unlocker. :)[/QUOTE]
Yes, but it’s the first time that chip makers are trying to take advantage of consumers.

I remember the days of the 286’s when PC’s were sold as “UPTO 26Mhz”, although the ships actually ran at 10Mhz by default.

The same will happen here … Dell/HP & etc will be selling PC’s with 4/6/8 core @ 4Ghz CPU’s with little disclaimers hiding at the end/bottom of the catalogue/site stating that the CPU is locked to 2cores @ 3Ghz … and that the user must pay for the “upgrade”.

This is a consumer nightmare. It’s like LED’s all over again :stuck_out_tongue:

Remember the ADM Athlon series with the “it’s not the real processor speed, but it sure works like an Intel cpu with that number” naming convention?

Amd Athlon 2200+, meaning it ran just as fast as a 2.2GHz intel. It ran far lower though.

[QUOTE=debro;2545817]Yes, but it’s the first time that chip makers are trying to take advantage of consumers.[/QUOTE]Not really the first :wink:
Big Blue and other Big Iron companies did this for ages. The number of CPUs that can be used is determined by the license agreement.

Another example: an el-cheapo-electronics vendor here in Germany sells a Satellite Dish Receiver. They also sell a firmware upgrade CD that enables PVR capabilities of this receiver.

Michael

I remember the marketing spin on the Pentium OverDrive chips. The changing socket specifications required many MBs to use interposer connectors to match the connections up. What a bunch of garbage.

[QUOTE=getit29;2545800]
I have the Phenom II X3 720 triple core CPU

I usually run it around 3.2GHz for everyday use on stock voltage I might just water-cool
it someday and see just how far I can push it. :iagree:[/QUOTE]

Really how did you do that and on stock voltage? I find that hard to see that it is just stock voltage??

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2545831]Remember the ADM Athlon series with the “it’s not the real processor speed, but it sure works like an Intel cpu with that number” naming convention?

Amd Athlon 2200+, meaning it ran just as fast as a 2.2GHz intel. It ran far lower though.[/QUOTE]
But the AMD mopped floor with intels “equivalent” cpu’s … at least at the start. After the Core CPU’s were released, the naming convention was a bit useless.

[QUOTE=mciahel;2545881]Not really the first :wink:
Big Blue and other Big Iron companies did this for ages. The number of CPUs that can be used is determined by the license agreement.[/QUOTE]
Agreed. I must have had a major brainfart moment. Perhaps what I was suggesting was that it wasn’t a highly obvious rip-off.

[QUOTE=mciahel;2545881]Big Blue and other Big Iron companies did this for ages. The number of CPUs that can be used is determined by the license agreement.[/QUOTE] Compaq used to do this with internal memory on servers.

I’ve seen this done with an enterprise hardware firewall (can’t remember the brand, probably Sonicwall.) It came supplied with an internal HDD fitted, but it required an optional license upgrade to active the internal HDD, e.g. allow storing of logs. The annoying thing in this is case is that I’m sure the cost of the HDD is somewhere in the original hardware cost, but obviously the HDD cannot be used unless the user chooses to pay the optional upgrade fee.

On the other hand, it’s not that much different to hardware where there is a service/subscription charge to use its extra features or gain extra performance out of it.

Few other examples:

[B]Sky+ PVR receiver[/B] (Ireland & UK). It will function fine as a FTA satellite receiver, but you must pay a subscription fee (I think £10/€15 per month) to enable the PVR capability without availing of any Pay TV channels. What’s worse here is that unlike what Michael mentioned above, it’s not a one-time fee. If if you cancel the subscription, you lose the PVR capability.

[B]PCs[/B] - Assuming your PC is running Windows, you’ve already paid a fair percentage of your PC cost to Microsoft. The costs become obvious if you try building your own PC, assuming you don’t go the Linux route. :wink:

[B]Mobile phone, Electric heaters, Water filters, etc[/B]. - The more you use them the more you pay.

[B]HD Cable/Satellite receiver[/B] (most countries) - You pay a HD subscription fee just to get the subscription channels in HD.

[B]Television[/B] (some countries) - You have to pay an annual license to have one. In this case the license fee doesn’t unlock anything special, but you don’t want to be caught with a TV without a license. :disagree:

It is no problem what so ever to hit 3.2GHz on stock voltage just up the
multiplier to 16x in the BIOS and its good to go and is as stable as any
pet rock could be 24/7. :clap:

Here is a CPU-Z shot and an AMD Overdrive shot of it at 3.2 on 1.3 stock voltage
and not all that bad of idle temps either @25c. :iagree:



This is ISP style marketing. My ISP sold my internet (and still does) as “Up to 7 Mega” and only delivers 768Kb. Unfortunately they are the only ISP that sells to my area, Intel is not the only chip maker around.

[QUOTE=Drum;2546778]My ISP sold my internet (and still does) as “Up to 7 Mega” and only delivers 768Kb.[/QUOTE]Fits perfectly:) 7 Megabits is advertised, you get 768 KBytes/sec. Nothing to complain :bigsmile:

Michael

Yup. Don’t confuse your Mb with your MB.