Intel will stop making their own motherboards

vbimport

#1

Did anyone see the report that Intel will no longer make their own motherboards? They expect the process to drag on over the next three years, and they will have models for Haswell, but by the time they release the Broadwell series of processors, Intel should be out of the motherboard business entirely.

I never used an Intel motherboard personally. They always seemed overpriced and had fewer features than I needed, but many of their boards were noted for being extremely stable.

It just seems another small step by a major player away from desktops.


#2

My comment on their Motherboards:

Stable, but spartan.

Personally I’ll pick an ASUS board most times.


#3

Since most of them were rebadged Foxconn mobo’s that were overpriced, I’m not sure what the big kerfuffle is all about.


#4

…I agree in the past I had some Intel boards and the quality of components was pretty good however in the last years the quality start to become worse and they boards become nothing more than a “locked” medium quality ones.


#5

Personally I don’t think that it matters if you think Intel boards were good or just average. I think it’s more concerning that Intel doesn’t see a future in making motherboards, and from that you may assume that is because there is no great future in desktop PC’s.

Ivy Bridge was a mobile processor scaled to the desktop. Haswell will take this a stage further, and Broadwell even further towards mobile computing.


#7

Looking at the few Intel boards I’ve seen, no great loss - do they actually sell retail at all, or only OEM?


#8

I think it wouldn’t make a huge difference. I was never a fan of their motherboards anyway. :slight_smile:


#9

It’s about time considering Intel’s motherboards were just average at their best.


#10

The Bad Axe 2 was great.


#11

They’re one of the 3 brands that I consider high end - Intel, Supermicro, and Tyan. I wouldn’t want a server board not designed by one of those 3. Down to 2 I guess…
Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, etc etc are good for everyday desktop boards, and I prefer them for desktop features and overclocking, but in terms of quality they’re not the top tier IMO.

At least with older Intel boards, they were extremely conservative in their designs, and had amazing documentation. Where a Taiwanese/Chinese board designer would give 3 sentences of Engrish, Intel would give 3 pages of technical detail. And if you did something wrong, Intel wouldn’t let you cheat. They wrote the chipset and processor specs so everything was by the book - both in the motherboard design and in what they required of you the user.
I haven’t used a modern Intel board, so maybe they’ve changed.

[QUOTE=Matth;2680931]Looking at the few Intel boards I’ve seen, no great loss - do they actually sell retail at all, or only OEM?[/QUOTE]
I’ve seen them at Fry’s, but that was a long time ago. I don’t know if they’re still there. About the only thing I’d probably buy one for would be a low power NAS, not a desktop.

Historically, I think Intel used to sell a huge number of boards for use in branded PCs. Many P1-P3 era Dells, Gateways, etc that I’ve taken apart had Intel motherboards in them. But nowadays I guess the major brands source boards directly from FoxConn, ECS, or somebody else, not so much Intel anymore.

Good point. I think there will continue to be a market for desktop hardware, but I don’t know how big a market it will be. I think that market should at least include gamers, home NAS systems, and anybody who prefers sitting at a full size desk with full size devices. Personally I spend too much time in front of my computer to hunch over smaller hardware. Some people sit on a couch in front of a big screen TV, I sit in front of my desktop PC. I can’t be the only one.


#12

I only worked with a handful of Intel Desktops and their lack of features AND high price was amazing. They always seemed like “benchmark units” - a baseline of functions and then OEM took those and moved upward.

I suppose their Server Boards are the same - I suspect that they’ll keep making their server boards, actually, because I’ve seen some discussion about embedded CPUs in their motherboards.


#13

[QUOTE=Dee;2675993]Personally I don’t think that it matters if you think Intel boards were good or just average. I think it’s more concerning that Intel doesn’t see a future in making motherboards, and from that you may assume that is because there is no great future in desktop PC’s.[/QUOTE]

Unfortunately PC desktop/Laptop are and will be with us for some time to come I have yet to see a tablet that can do what a Desktop or Laptop can do and perform and expand of which Tablet is proprietary and won’t expand hardware wise and cost to replace or upgrade is also a limiting factor to Tablet demise as a truly computing device. Games and software are still and will be programmed on a Desktop system with some laptop usage here as that is where the power reside and testing can be done before it is shipped for ahem…tablet device to use. Even console games are programmed on Desktop devices even though they claim more buyers buy console games if the Desktop didn’t exist you can almost guarantee console would be around as well. The Desktop made everything else possible should one think they can just pass it off as nothing was important about it. So those using Desktop/Laptop and not recognizing what important those two hardware advances made for all and everyone to use and enjoy is lacking in historical background where computer came from and what it took and now what everyone takes for granted-(this is for the mass not anyone in particular). I grew up in the age of IBM PS/2 and APPLE IIe and Commodore, Radio shack in the beginning days of computing to truly enjoy and realize the dreams it made and changes it brought.

[QUOTE=shamino;2697701]They’re one of the 3 brands that I consider high end - Intel, Supermicro, and Tyan. I wouldn’t want a server board not designed by one of those 3. Down to 2 I guess…
Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, etc etc are good for everyday desktop boards, and I prefer them for desktop features and overclocking, but in terms of quality they’re not the top tier IMO.[/QUOTE]

I am a Asus board user and find that a bias statement even if opinion without any experience behind it to start with. My board has worked fine since 2009 when I built it from scratch and it has multiple HDD and components and card inside that runs and work fine for me.

[QUOTE=shamino;2697701]Good point. I think there will continue to be a market for desktop hardware, but I don’t know how big a market it will be. I think that market should at least include gamers, home NAS systems, and anybody who prefers sitting at a full size desk with full size devices. Personally I spend too much time in front of my computer to hunch over smaller hardware. Some people sit on a couch in front of a big screen TV, I sit in front of my desktop PC. I can’t be the only one.[/QUOTE]

Well you forgot programming and CAD and graphics designs need a reliable Desktop with power to feed to work. Gamers and NAS are the extreme where the desktop especially for Gamers has to be top notched hardware and components not 3rd rate class to play at high level. NAS just needs a basic Desktop with lots of HDD or SSD to store the movies to stream and doesn’t need a ultra power system to do such task compared to Gamer Rigs. So your leaving out the others that play in this field as well.


#14

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2697733]I am a Asus board user and find that a bias statement even if opinion without any experience behind it to start with. My board has worked fine since 2009 when I built it from scratch and it has multiple HDD and components and card inside that runs and work fine for me.
[/QUOTE]
I’ve had lots of systems with lots of motherboards, including Asus. My current main PC is a Gigabyte, last one before that was ABit, and before that an Asus. Before that, a high end HP.
I built an Asus recently for my parents, and a couple of near relatives have LGA775 Asus boards. I didn’t say they were bad, I just don’t place them in the same tier as the high end brands I mentioned earlier. Asus is a very successful mainstream brand, and for most purposes I’m fine with them, as I am with Gigabyte, MSI, etc.
My favorite Asus was a P2B-F I used as my daily a few years ago. I cherry picked 2 of them from several boards I had at the time. I used one myself, and gave another to a relative. Tested both stable at 140FSB, ran them at 133FSB, 1GB PC133 CL2. In that configuration the 440BX was an awesome overachiever.

Well you forgot programming and CAD and graphics designs need a reliable Desktop with power to feed to work. Gamers and NAS are the extreme where the desktop especially for Gamers has to be top notched hardware and components not 3rd rate class to play at high level. NAS just needs a basic Desktop with lots of HDD or SSD to store the movies to stream and doesn’t need a ultra power system to do such task compared to Gamer Rigs. So your leaving out the others that play in this field as well.
I don’t think programming or CAD are mainstream enough to drive that much consumer demand. Photo editing might be a bigger one though. I would imagine much more people play games than those other things.
Programming doesn’t really require more power than what it takes to test whatever you’re coding. But it’s more comfortable when seated at a desktop, as I’d argue is always the case, even when not programming. :slight_smile: I think there will always be people who find desktops more comfortable, regardless of what they do with them.

I don’t know what sales statistics are showing but I expect demand for home NAS will be increasing. People have multiple systems nowadays and need a place to store all their stuff. That’s why I think it could be a significant contributor to demand for components in a desktop form factor. However - I overlooked the fact that most people will probably just buy prefab NAS units, not build them out of components. So it might not really create the amount of demand for desktop parts that I’d like to think.

Those who do build their own NAS, are likely to use a basic desktop board, as you suggested. That’s good news for the desktop market. Personally, due to the critical role, I prefer to use a server board for this job. However, in performance terms, modern desktop boards have enough bus bandwidth that they probably perform just as well. On older boards (which I normally deal with), the limitations of a desktop’s bus architecture are significant.


#15

I sold two (used) Intel Q35 motherboards for about US$15 each. Used P35 motherboard was priced around US$20. Sometimes Intel motherboards were cheaper than Asus and sometimes there were good things on them that were not easily found in others. Not making their own motherboards probably means Intel motherboards will be no more sold to end users. I saw the three Intel CPU importers based in Seoul distributing Intel motherboards as well. There are immense profits in importing and selling Intel processors especially since it also includes US$1,300 Extreme processors, US$2,500 Xeon processors. But those that used to buy Intel motherboards would also have bought Supermicro and Tyan motherboards. It was awkward for any of the distributors to sell Intel motherboards. It was proud for them to be the authorized dealers of Supermicro and Tyan.