Intel silently releases new mobile Celeron CPUs

vbimport

#1

Intel silently releases new mobile Celeron CPUs.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2012/08/tbmeTH.jpg[/newsimage]Intel silently released new Celeron CPUs


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/intel-silently-releases-new-mobile-celeron-cpus-62850/](http://www.myce.com/news/intel-silently-releases-new-mobile-celeron-cpus-62850/)


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#2

I’d like to see Ivy Bridge on more mobile machines - phones. The term mobile is becoming more confusing. Sandy Bridge Celeron-based laptops are already very cheap, some cheaper than the second-generation iPad.


#3

Celeron is still alive? Go figure. The word always left a bad taste in my mouth. Like “vomit”… or “pus”. We bought a few Celeron systems back in the day. I wasn’t impressed, so I said P4 only from then on. They were regarded as a poor man’s processor.


#4

Weren’t celerons used from 600mhz to 1.5ghz. days?
Generally, they lacked OOMPH… Something about lack of co-processors to VERY low on-chip memory crippled these chips back in the day… these were the only chips which competed on price with AMD in the later 1990s…

As I said, the chip making business has no new cloak… innovation is basically at a stand-still… if there was something exciting on the near horizon, Intel would be shouting it from the rafters… even in a down economy.


#5

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2646979]Weren’t celerons used from 600mhz to 1.5ghz. days?
Generally, they lacked OOMPH… Something about lack of co-processors to VERY low on-chip memory crippled these chips back in the day… these were the only chips which competed on price with AMD in the later 1990s…

As I said, the chip making business has no new cloak… innovation is basically at a stand-still… if there was something exciting on the near horizon, Intel would be shouting it from the rafters… even in a down economy.[/QUOTE]

A $400 Celeron laptop sold today can outperform any Pentium 4 desktop, but the brand name Celeron is far less used now.


#6

I remember reading a post by someone more in the know about CPU’s mentioning Celeron was just a reused title. The newer Celeron line has no relation to the original generation of Celeron CPU’s. If your into HTPC’s they’re very popular for budget builds.


#7

[QUOTE=DM85;2647176]I remember reading a post by someone more in the know about CPU’s mentioning Celeron was just a reused title. The newer Celeron line has no relation to the original generation of Celeron CPU’s. If your into HTPC’s they’re very popular for budget builds.[/QUOTE]

I’m not sure what the “no relation” means.

Celeron-based laptops with $400 price tage are fast. You can add one of the fastest SSD’s and make it faster than most $2,000 laptops with HDD only.


#8

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2647235]I’m not sure what the “no relation” means.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conroe_(microprocessor)#Allendale

Celeron-based laptops with $400 price tage are fast. You can add one of the fastest SSD’s and make it faster than most $2,000 laptops with HDD only.[/QUOTE]

When I say “no relation” it’s in regards to the info you posted. It’s just a reused title.


#9

[QUOTE=DM85;2647253]When I say “no relation” it’s in regards to the info you posted. It’s just a reused title.[/QUOTE]

You mean “not based on the same architecture or same core” perhaps. In that sense, it has always been a title only. Whenever Intel releases a new major CPU product family, since around the Pentium II era, it is soon, or not so soon, acompanied by a much cheaper Celeron version based on the same core but with lower clocks and less cache memory, sometimes also with some features missing or disabled.

Since there have been some consumers laughing at the Celeron brand names, Intel this time practically divided the Celeron lines into two: Celeron and Pentium. The G530 and G540 processors based on Sandy Bridge cores are sold under Celeron name, but the G630 and G640 also based on Sandy Bridge are sold under Pentium name. The price difference between G540 (about $40) and G620 (about $60) is small, but the difference may mean a lot more to some people than to some others.


#10

Its not the same old Celeron that we used to use.:disagree:


#11

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2647263]You mean “not based on the same architecture or same core” perhaps. In that sense, it has always been a title only. Whenever Intel releases a new major CPU product family, since around the Pentium II era, it is soon, or not so soon, acompanied by a much cheaper Celeron version based on the same core but with lower clocks and less cache memory, sometimes also with some features missing or disabled.

Since there have been some consumers laughing at the Celeron brand names, Intel this time practically divided the Celeron lines into two: Celeron and Pentium. The G530 and G540 processors based on Sandy Bridge cores are sold under Celeron name, but the G630 and G640 also based on Sandy Bridge are sold under Pentium name. The price difference between G540 (about $40) and G620 (about $60) is small, but the difference may mean a lot more to some people than to some others.[/QUOTE]

That’s exactly what I meant. You put into words what I couldn’t :bow:.


#12

Has intel ever released Celeron CPU’s with any fanfare?


#13

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2647406]Has intel ever released Celeron CPU’s with any fanfare?[/QUOTE]

You mean with cake and balloons?


#14

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2647406]Has intel ever released Celeron CPU’s with any fanfare?[QUOTE=DukeNukem;2647461]You mean with cake and balloons?[/QUOTE]
[/QUOTE]
And Clowns? In tiny little cars? And My Little Ponies…


#15

Celeron processors are more targeted for OEM than high-end and mid-range processors. Low-end processors are also far more popular in China and India than in North America just like the hundreds of millions of dumb phones by Nokia and Samsung are still sold in Africa and Asia.


#16

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2647466]Celeron processors are more targeted for OEM than high-end and mid-range processors. Low-end processors are also far more popular in China and India than in North America just like the hundreds of millions of dumb phones by Nokia and Samsung are still sold in Africa and Asia.[/QUOTE]

I was thinking “OEM in bargain basement computers”

Generally celeron CPU’s are about as exciting as generic
(store brand) canned green beans.

AD


#17

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2647482]I was thinking “OEM in bargain basement computers”

Generally celeron CPU’s are about as exciting as generic
(store brand) canned green beans.

AD[/QUOTE]

That was harsh as Intel has to compete against ARM with Atom which is like the lower-end version of Celeron after all. Samsung Electronics alone will sell about 500 million to a billion smartphones in a year approximately when Intel starts mass production of 14nm-based Atom processors for phones and tablets.

One of the reasons Celeron isn’t exciting for most of the earliest-adopting power users is the Celeron version of any new-generation processors is released about one year after the initial release. It works like the way the large US book publishers first print and release hardcover editions at $30 for the most interested readers and massmarket paperback editions at $10 for the more budget-minded readers. I live in South Korea where they make all kind of efforts to prevent the importation of English-language books so I wait for more than one year usually and look for bookstores importing from book distributors in any English-speaking country selling massmarket paperback copies at heavily discounted prices.

The difference between a yet-to-be-released Celeron based on Ivy Bridge core and an i7 Ivy Bridge is much smaller than that between SSD and HDD or between a Q5 panel-based monitor and most other monitors. But then it’s relatively easy to add 2560*1440 monitors and stripe SSD’s to a single system while there’s no cheap solution to have several Celeron processors on a single $40 motherboard.


#18

I think Celeron’s are Ok i mean I wouldn’t use one because they’re not the fastest things in the world but I think that they are fantastic value for what they offer. I mean most people don’t need a good computer these days to browse the web, watch videos and all that. I would like to see how they fair against the rest of the Intel range :smiley:


#19

The Sandy Bridge Celerons are a pick by many for Home Theater PC. Low power and decent HD graphics. Not to mention very low cost. The Ivy Bridge will likely be even better.