Intel announces 20nm 335-series SSDs, 50% lower power usage

vbimport

#1

Intel announces 20nm 335-series SSDs, 50% lower power usage.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2012/10/coxj2Y.jpg[/newsimage]Intel has expanded its range of Solid State Disk drives with the 335 series.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/intel-announces-20nm-335-series-ssds-50-lower-power-usage-64569/](http://www.myce.com/news/intel-announces-20nm-335-series-ssds-50-lower-power-usage-64569/)


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#2

Does anybody know what effect the 20nm process has on drive write endurance? I seem to recall that the move to 2xnm was criticized for dropping it to no more than 3k p/e cycles, but reviewers seem to have been especially hesitant to address the topic since then…


#3

I don’t know that I’d give high credence to any ‘study’ being delivered on the topic at this time, since these would be funded by Intel or by their contractors or other lackeys. But “let others have the bleeding edge of technology” isn’t a bad option. Intel spent two years pumping up RAMBUS memory, after all. Kajillions were spent on that boondoggle, and then the DotCom Crash had to occur when all those venture capitalists discovered Intel’s “research” wasn’t so great and all those kajillions were wasted.


#4

There isn’t really any studies going on as far as know for endurance among reviewers.
The reason is quite simple. Write endurance is a moving goalpost from user to user, and it’s governed by the following factors.

The NAND rated write cycles (PE/C).
The capacity of the SSD.
The write amplification of the controller.
The amount of data on the drive, or to be more accurate. The amount of free space on the SSD.

The most important factor is the amount of free space, as the wear levelling algorithms will move around the data to make sure all NAND is worn evenly. The less free space there is on the SSD, then the faster the write cycles are used.

Since all users will have different amounts of free space, you can appreciate how difficult it is to try and test for endurance.

The only thing I would say is. If you have around 20% free space, then you should expect to get at least 15 years of use out of the SSD. By which time it will long past its sell by date.


#5

[QUOTE=dakotabob;2662129]Does anybody know what effect the 20nm process has on drive write endurance? I seem to recall that the move to 2xnm was criticized for dropping it to no more than 3k p/e cycles, but reviewers seem to have been especially hesitant to address the topic since then…[/QUOTE]

Who was the one that criticized the move to 2x nm process? Those that make such decisions are usually top CEO’s and largest shareholders of Intel, Samsung, SK-Hynix, Micron, Toshiba… It’s they that lose most either by switching to newer processes and another plant and the amount of investment tends to scale to billions of dollars.

2x nm has been tried and improved upon for years. Recall all the posts criticizing the move from HDD to NAND. There were hundreds on this forum alone and the web was full of them posted by so-called experts and power users. Most of the posters clearly had no knowledge and no wisdom to predict on anything other than that based on their own prejudices.