iHAS324 Transfer Test Shows Bigger than Normal Dip at Layer Breaks Most Burns Suddenly

vbimport

#1

I got a Liteon iHAS324 a few months ago and good burns every time. I usually only do dual layer burns with verbatim dvd+r. Suddenly it started to show bigger than normal dips at the layer break and normal curve otherwise on transfer rate tests. i bought 2 of the same model so i swapped in the backup and after about 10 good burns it started exhibiting the same friggin behavior. i tried opening a new pack of verbatim blanks and defragging the dvd files i’m burning. no change. here’s what i’m talking about and what could be the problem:


#2

Everything looks fine. Where is the Problem?


#3

that’s not normal. a normal dip at the layer break is just a small indent like in this scan here



#4

It’s a normal dip.

Even time-wise, the 7.11 GB disc (which does still have a tiny dip) is faster than the 7.38 GB disc (shown in the first post) by a mere 15 seconds. For 12x, which is somewhere between 15 and 18 MB/s, this is a perfect time difference for ~270 MB and indicates the drive effectively changed layers with no issue at all.

A drive or disc with an actual problem would have probably shown issues before the layer change, and/or it would have not continued at 12x after the layer change. A drop all the way down to 0 would also probably indicate an issue, but a drop down to zero would likely be paired with the drive not continuing at 12x.

That said, if you’re concerned about the drive rapidly deteriorating, you might consider limiting the drive to 8x if you’re using tools to verify discs. Or you might consider letting the drive deteriorate, at which point it will become better at telling you when discs are poor. Either way, I wouldn’t worry too much.


#5

^ really? i need to play it to see if the layer break has a noticeable pause in the one with the bigger dip. i’ve only ever seen the small indent at the layer break on all my good burns for the past decade. not that i scan all the time, but i’ve done it enough times.

i see the small indent when it’s good and big dips usually in the second half the of the scan when something is wrong. usually caused by bad media, burnt out burner, or conflict caused by software. never seen this slightly bigger than normal dip at the layer break before.

i updated my motherboards bios, installed a missing driver for uguru(overclocking thing built into mobo) to get rid of exclamation point in device manager, ran defrag, and uninstalled the defrag program which had a process running at all times even when the program is closed. i think the last one might have been the cause. now i’ve burned 4 discs in a row with the normal small indent at the layer break. i hopefully have resolved the “problem” even if it’s just a problem imo.


#6

Thing is, you know more about your burning patterns than I do, so when you say that’s an anomaly, I have to roll with it, right? :slight_smile:

I would like to note, now that you bring it up, CD-DVD Speed is sensitive to background activities, or sensitive to you moving its window around while it’s working, even. So if that defrag app actually started to run at any point, it maybe – just MAYBE – affected how often CD-DVD Speed was actually taking samples to display. I’d think the actual burn was fine, though.

You could always do a disc quality scan at 12x to help convince you of how well the drive(s) has (have) been handling the layer breaks.

Just out of curiosity, how fast have you been writing the discs, and do you know if they’re made in the U.A.E., or Singapore, or Taiwan, or India? Also, is it MKM 001 or MKM 003?


#7

^ they are mkm 001 and i only burn them at 2.4x. made in singapore. i burned a few perfect ones and got a bigger dip again at the layer break again. i’m out of ideas other than starting over with a fresh install which seems ridiculous for just this since otherwise my computer is running normal.

how would i find out where the layer break is in the movie? i want to watch just that part to see if the layer break pauses very quickly like usual or if it’s noticeably longer. i burned an iso with mds so i didn’t get to decide like when it’s a folder.



#8

insert disc - open ImgBurn - tools,drive,display IFO layer break position

You might get two or more positions, as ImgBurn has to guess. But it gives you the times of the approx layer break, so check around each one of those. I pretty much guarantee that you won’t have any issue on a “big dipper” that you wouldn’t have on a “little dipper”. Note that if it’s in the middle of a fast-action scene, it’s going to be noticeable regardless.


#9

[QUOTE=Albert;2747273]insert disc - open ImgBurn - tools,drive,display IFO layer break position

You might get two or more positions, as ImgBurn has to guess. But it gives you the times of the approx layer break, so check around each one of those. I pretty much guarantee that you won’t have any issue on a “big dipper” that you wouldn’t have on a “little dipper”. Note that if it’s in the middle of a fast-action scene, it’s going to be noticeable regardless.[/QUOTE]

hey man, thanks for your help :slight_smile: you were right about it playing normally. i wrote down the time of the layer break i chose and checked it expecting a long pause and it played without any noticeable pause at all and it was mid-scene. i think it’s cause i had the same burner for a few years and only recently got a new model. i’ve never had a burner that scanned with anything more than a very tiny dip at the layer break so i assumed it was a problem. i’ve been burning dvd’s for like a decade and had many models from back when benq 1640 was king. i’ve never seen a slightly bigger dip at the layer break with good burns.

now that i know everything is good, i can go back to what i normally do. that’s only scanning a burn periodically as a “spot check”. i usually just burn verbatim dl @2.4x and the occasional ty @8x. maybe scan a couple burns a month. ever since i started burning dual layers mostly i don’t need to get a new burner for like 3 or 4 years instead of every 1 to 1 1/2 years. wears the drive out a lot slower. i’m rambling now. thanks dude.


#10

I’m just glad to hear it’s working for you. :slight_smile:

But the bonus is that these W-series drives are basically like the old Optiarc drives, so they burn well and tend to make folks happy. Hopefully these drives and those discs keep working well for you as time goes on. :wink:


#11

[Pulled from a message which might be better off public because…well, why not? Might help someone.]

Optiarc drives have always been a little sensitive when it comes to reading. They’re strong enough and can be fast, but sometimes they’ll show a little wiggle while they read. LG drives & drives from LiteOn and Samsung with MediaTek chips tend to be the strongest at reading so long as there’s no significant issue, and then all the other drives fall into line after that.

And remember, background tasks can affect the TRT…plus small dips where the drive doesn’t ultimately slow down are still OK to me. The edge of a disc is often the hardest to read at full speed.

Also – and I ask this for good reason – how is the drive when it comes to writing at 16x? 18x? Faster? Does it have any buffering issues?

Plus, I must ask: what media were you writing? What MID, and what speed?