I3 3225 HTPC build

I have a 120GB SSD, Logitech K400 keyboard, a DVD burner and a 1GB WD hard drive already…Been waiting for HD4000 graphics. Thoughts? Suggestions?

PS: The memory is free.

Well since no one talked me out of it, I ordered it. Added an LG WH14NS40 BD Writer to the order, but I’ll probably move my TSST SH-S223 DVD drive and put the BD drive in my big box.

That should make for a powerful rig.
i3 3225 has HD2500 rather than HD4000, so 6 EU cores compared to HD4000 16 EU cores.
That shouldn’t make a lot of difference unless you’re a gamer. Things like Quick Sync (for example) should be just as fast on HD2500.

[QUOTE=Dee;2653846]That should make for a powerful rig.
i3 3225 has HD2500 rather than HD4000, so 6 EU cores compared to HD4000 16 EU cores.
That shouldn’t make a lot of difference unless you’re a gamer. Things like Quick Sync (for example) should be just as fast on HD2500.[/QUOTE]
Then is this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116774 in error?

edit…Intel ARK says HD4000 too.

It seems there is some conflicting info.
http://www.scan.co.uk/products/intel-core-i3-3225-s-1155-ivy-bridge-h-dual-core-33ghz-3mb-smart-cache-retail

[edit] I found this quote on another site.

Core i3 3225 is basically same as 3220 but with HD4000 graphics instead of HD2500

So it looks like it is indeed HD4000.

I see that. I hope your source is the incorrect one, as I really don’t want to spend $150 US on a 6 shooter. I believe encoders are finally going to get a handle on QuickSync and want the 16 eu model. If Newegg and Ark are wrong, I see an RMA in my future. I’d probably go for an i5 3570K then, though I don’t want the heat…

I found this review. It seems it is HD4000. :clap:

That’s good. Can’t wait to crunch some AVC with it. I have a QuickSync optimized AVC encoder that can make a 720p 8GB AVC from a 42GB 720p recording in about 25 minutes on my i7 2600 HD2000 rig…Wonder how much faster this will be?

From what I’ve seen, about 40% faster with HD4000.
Linky

I’m always surprised when home-theater PCs don’t include a TV card.

I have 3 cable TV decoder/tuners attached to my network (HDHomerun Prime with CABLECard) and a couple Hauppauge USB NTSC/ATSC/Composite Video cards. TV is definitely part of my HTPCs.


So is upgrading to HD4000 worth it? Dee’s numbers seem to say so. It’s nice that there’s a 55 watt part with that graphics. Nice price too, only a little more than a Sandy Bridge. In fact cheaper than many of the Sandy Bridge i3’s.

[QUOTE=olyteddy;2653825]… and a 1GB WD hard drive already…[/QUOTE] You may want to get a hard drive that will hold more than [I]one[/I] video file! :stuck_out_tongue:

[QUOTE=olyteddy;2653825]I have a 120GB SSD, Logitech K400 keyboard, a DVD burner and a 1GB WD hard drive already…Been waiting for HD4000 graphics. Thoughts? Suggestions?

PS: The memory is free.[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2653942]You may want to get a hard drive that will hold more than [I]one[/I] video file! :p[/QUOTE]

Actually I meant 1,000 1GB drives. I plan on using RAID 500. That sucker’s gonna be so fast you can read the data [I]before[/I] it’s been written or even created…:bigsmile:

Oly, have you compared USB-TV-Stick recordings to internal-TV-card recordings? I haven’t. I want to know! We use the PCI / PCIe TV cards everywhere (Hauppauge 1600s and 2200s) and are pleased with their recording quality. Their claims of “hardware MPEG recording” are the primary draw, but the recent argument that modern CPUs can handle this load plus offer superior software encoding is the basis for testing.

I assume that, with two USB sticks, you’re watching one channel and recording another, yes? (Or at least have that capability, I mean.)

My main tuner now sits out on the network with three tuners available to any client on the network. It doesn’t record, per say, rather it just tunes and un-scrambles cable TV channels and then streams them to the client PC. What the PC gets is the actual MPEG2 or AVC TransportStream that was modulated on the channel (whether it’s 480i, 480p, 720p or 1080i). Content tagged ‘Copy Freely’ can be watched or captured (it is already digital video) with almost any app like VLC or SageTV or the included ‘Quick TV’ app. That’s most of the ComCast channels so far. However, due to limitations of DRM that CableLabs and content providers placed on using a CableCard, ‘Copy Once’ (mostly the premiums, like HBO and SHO) streams can only be viewed or captured in Windows Media Center. WMC, once set up, allows one click from the guide viewing or recording of any or all the available tuners, so I can capture all 3 at once, watch one and capture two, watch all three, or any combo. I can also add more HDHomeRuns for more tuners. Not bad for a $130 or so box…
BTW, I only plug in the USB box when I need a NTSC video input.

Thanks for this. We don’t bother with modern program captures - most of those are on disk, or repeated [I]ad nauseum[/I]. Old movie channels have some never-to-be-released films, however, that are worthy of preserving if, for no other reason, that they’ll never been made commercially available by the rightskillers. Er, rights-warehousers.

My favorite and best TV-capture unit is an old ATI All-In-Wonder AGP video card that has their software that can tune the capture and encoding features so minutely, so perfectly. Every product after that has been many lesser steps. “We only offer Best Quality” with no capability to fine-tune any other aspect. grrr

“We only offer Best Quality” with no capability to fine-tune any other aspect. grrr

I get an exact clone of the program.

I have 3 SATA devices - an SSD, a HDD and a DVD drive and only 2 SATA 3 ports. Obviously the DVD drive gets an SATA 2 and the SSD SATA3. Does it matter which I hook the HDD to? I know it won’t need the SATA 3 speed, and I don’t think it will force the SSD to slow down.

I would put the SSD on SATA3 port 0.
The HDD and ODD on SATA2.
Also make sure that SATA is set AHCI in the UEFI, and that you use the latest RST SATA drivers from the AsRock site.