I need to know

vbimport

#1

Why exactly is a no-CD crack illegal even when you own the original game?:confused:


#2

Cause it’s not allowed to change the original. (copyrights?)
When you make an exact 1:1 copy (of your orig) it is allowed.


#3

Originally posted by SchiZomaGORE
Why exactly is a no-CD crack illegal even when you own the original game?:confused:

They easy-and-normal way to crack something is to try to get the source code of the original executable file that starts the program (let’s say fifa2002.exe for instance).

Now since there is no source code available for the fifa2002.exe except when you’re a programmer at Electronic Arts , the people who tend to crack the copy protection get another method.

They copy fifa2002.exe in their favourite hex editors or other things crackers use and try to reverse engineer the process. Make a working source out of the compiled executable.

And that’s illegal… that copying is … AND that reverse engineering is.


#4

Here you can read a previous discussion:
http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?threadid=46741
http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?threadid=45625


#5

When you install a program or game or whatever there is always a license on wich you have to agree. It is always stated in this license that no part of the software may be alterd without the permisson of the company who holds the copyrights of the software.
So the no cd crack is an changed version of the executable and thus illegal.


#6

Originally posted by Wookie
Cause it’s not allowed to change the original. (copyrights?)
When you make an exact 1:1 copy (of your orig) it is allowed.

This is correct, at least under Australian law, at least so long as the purpose of the 1 to 1 copy is for personal back-up (section 47C of the Copyright Act 1968 if anyone is remotely interested).

However, the exemption for personal back-up doesn’t apply “if the owner of the copyright in the computer program has so designed the program that copies of it cannot be made without modifying the program” (paragraph 4(b)) and there’s no doubt that that is what the manufacturers of copy-protected cds have attempted to do. Still, given the precise wording, I guess that so long as they fail, we’re all ok.
:bigsmile: