I have a hard drive but it's slow starting-up and I only want it for the OS

vbimport

#1

I store most of my files on external hard drives so I only want to use this hard drive for the OS, but it’s slow starting-up and I’m wondering what it is. Although it’s got errors which you can see in the screenshot below I’m wondering if it’s to do with developing them with them having to reallocate parts of a program somewhere else on the hard drive thus slow booting?:

Here’s another screenshot this time of the Health tab and I’m asking this question to save me from reinstalling the OS if that’ll help or if there’s another way of solving this problem such as defragmenting my hard drive if that’ll help? I’m wondering if chkdsk has saved parts of those programs before where they were stored became errors thus scattering them all?:


#2

Don’t, replace it
Given that it’s 80Gb it’ll be slow no matter what you do…
//Danne


#3

Hi,[QUOTE=Mark Thompson;2535396]I store most of my files on external hard drives so I only want to use this hard drive for the OS, but it’s slow starting-up and I’m wondering what it is. [/QUOTE]The reason is your bad HDD. It needs to be replaced.

Michael


#4

Your harddrive is dying.

You will need to replace your harddrive and either reinstall Windows or restore a previous backup (if you have one) from before your harddrive delevloped those errors.


#5

I have files on it I want to keep, but I can easily transfer those on to another hard drive and when I’m using it as an external hard drive to read files from it it’s as fast as it was when the OS on it was running before so if I just reinstall the OS on it without replacing the hard drive will it just be as fast as before it started developing those errors? Thank you very much for the answers so far btw


#6

To put it this way, try running your car with would any motor oil and see how long it survives. It may work the first few miles/kilometers but after that…
//Danne


#7

True but it’s weird how I can access files from it speedily when I’m using it as an external hard drive so I’m thinking that it’s something to do with those damaged areas where I’m assuming the OS was stored. That’s the whole idea of reallocation, isn’t it? Not knowing much about hard drives with those areas being damaged I can only assume chkdsk salvaged the data in those areas and put them somewhere else then marked them as damaged if they weren’t already damaged because how can you salvage data from an already damaged area? Wouldn’t this explain the reason why it is slow?


#8

Apparently we’re not getting through to you.

Your harddrive is dying.
It will just keep getting more and more bad sectors, and anything you write to it may be unreadable the next time you want to read it.

A harddrive you cannot trust is worse than useless.

Get a new harddrive, back up the files you need (and are still able to read) from your old harddrive, and then reinstall Windows on the new harddrive.

Then throw away the old harddrive while resisting all temptation to use it for some purpose.

Or alternatively, ignore all our advice and do as you want. :wink:


#9

[QUOTE=Mark Thompson;2535454]That’s the whole idea of reallocation, isn’t it?[/QUOTE] Your harddrive is way past the point where the drive’s internal reallocation has been used up, otherwise you wouldn’t continue seeing bad sectors in a scan.


#10

I forgot to mention the hard drive lost power a few times when starting-up because there was a faulty loose molex cable and it did it also when I was accessing some files which later came to be unreadable, but I’ve fixed that now so doesn’t that explain why it’s slow at start up? It’s caused that problem and those areas aren’t necessarily damaged just that chkdsk has marked them because it couldn’t access them? This has happened too much because of the drive’s internal allocation being used-up so the next time I really develop a damaged area the drive won’t be able to reallocate it? Data loss

If I reinstall Windows on it then it should just be as fast as it was if I’m right before it caused that problem because it isn’t a problem with the hard drive itself.


#11

This seems to be your preferred solution:

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2535457]Or alternatively, ignore all our advice and do as you want. ;)[/QUOTE]

Go ahead and suffer more data loss on your dying harddrive - it’s your choice. :cool:


#12

Good Lord man!!! a drive with that many [B] RED[/B] blocks that says [B]DAMAGED[/B] and has a
[B]GREAT[/B] [B]BIG[/B] [B]RED[/B] [B]FAILED[/B] on the [B]REALLOCATED SECTOR COUNT[/B]
I wouldn’t trust that drive for 1 second much less wanting to go through all the trouble of doing a re-install
of Windows on it and hoping that will some how make it all magically disappear and have a like brand new drive
because and I hate to have to tell you this [B]it ain’t gonna happen [/B]:disagree: and this is what you’ll be doing later when
all of your data is gone. :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh:

I’m not trying to be a smart ass here or trying to insult you in any way at all so please do not take this the wrong way
because I was just wondering what part of[B] FAILED [/B] and [B]DAMAGED[/B]
did you not understand. :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:


#13

I’m a bit busy at the moment, but I think I’ll back-up the files I want to keep from it and then just reinstall Windows on it anyway just out-of-interest to see what happens then I’ll report back here with the results. I only want to use the hard drive for the OS anyway so if it goes it’s no loss to me because I keep all my files I want to keep on external hard drives. Just want to see if it goes just as fast as it did before and if I can get some more life out of it then it’ll save my buying a hard drive for my OS for a little longer at least. You haven’t insulted me just I don’t necessarily agree because I have another hard drive and that lost power because of my once faulty molex cable, but not once has it reported a problem so I think it’s something to do with the software in the other hard drive that more likely simulates a problem when power is lost.


#14

Is your time and files important enough for you, that you would care if your OS or programs suddenly hang or crash, thus making it impossible for you to save changes to your other harddrive?

If the answer is “yes”, then you should NOT use your defective harddrive for your OS or programs.

If the answer is “no”, then why have you been wasting everyone’s time in this thread? :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

Given the amount of damaged sectors I’d guess Windows wont even install correctly
//Danne


#16

[QUOTE=Mark Thompson;2535450]I have files on it I want to keep, but I can easily transfer those on to another hard drive and when I’m using it as an external hard drive to read files from it it’s as fast as it was when the OS on it was running before so if I just reinstall the OS on it without replacing the hard drive will it just be as fast as before it started developing those errors? Thank you very much for the answers so far btw[/QUOTE]

  1. Download Clonezilla.

  2. Boot Clonezilla.

  3. Plug in your portable HDD.

  4. Image your HDD to the USB portable HDD (as an image- not as disk to disk).

  5. Buy a new HDD.

  6. Install it, run clonezilla, point it to your USB portable drive.

  7. Do 1-6 ASAP before your current HDD fails beyond all redemption & you lose all your stuff :iagree:


#17

Since he apparently doesn’t care/mind does it really matter?
//Danne


#18

[QUOTE=DiiZzY;2536359]Since he apparently doesn’t care/mind does it really matter?
//Danne[/QUOTE]
I guess not.

In theory, the OP could partition the HDD & set the partition to miss the first few GB’s and then keep important documentation on an external HDD. But people generally want their HDD’s to be quick, and their OS to be responsive. An 80GB HDD is limping with a walking frame compared to even the slowest 5400RPM HDD’s on the market … even laptop drives.

And honestly … I palmed off / threw away 80GB HDD’s more than 3 or 4 years ago. I’m about to wipe and throw away a 160GB HDD, and I’m palming off a 500GB HDD to someone early next week, once I check that it has no personal info on it …

@OP … seriously? That Geriatric old HDD has liver failure, has been diagnosed with only months to live, and is mistakenly flirting with death. Is it really worth the trouble?


#19

[QUOTE=debro;2536437]In theory, the OP could partition the HDD & set the partition to miss the first few GB’s …[/QUOTE] Once a harddrive has developed bad sectors like this, the problem is very likely to spread and damage other sectors on the harddrive - at least on the same side of that disk platter. It really, really isn’t worth doing! :disagree:


#20

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2536449]Once a harddrive has developed bad sectors like this, the problem is very likely to spread and damage other sectors on the harddrive - at least on the same side of that disk platter. It really, really isn’t worth doing! :disagree:[/QUOTE]

I totally agree … but the OP obviously isn’t understanding the meaning of …

[B][/B][U][B]FAILED[/B][/U][B][/B]

[LEFT]Perhaps a picture is worth a thousands words.

The OP’s HDD:

[/LEFT]