I am a newbie and want to talk about torrents and P2P

vbimport

#1

Hi. I am a newbie. Nice to be on the forum.
K


#2

Hello Kimberly, welcome to the forums.

I’m afraid you’ve started a thread on a fairly touchy topic for us. We cannot discuss [B]specific[/B] copyright protected material that is distributed illegally. That includes the vast majority of files found on torrent sites and through usenet groups.

You should probably look through our guide for copyright protected material: http://club.myce.com/f34/guidelines-copyright-protected-material-316049/

If you wish to discuss P2P or usenet in the abstract, that is within our rules, but as I said, any mention of specific movies or other copyright protected material will lead to the thread being closed.

I personally don’t have experience with usenet, but someone else may show up and give you some pointers.


#3

Usenet was originally developed as a discussion system where people would ‘post’ to a group (similar to a threads in a forum). Now it is largely used for posting files. Unlike P2P the files are stored on a commercial server, giving far greater speeds. The range of files stored across Usenet is slightly less than what you might be able to find looking through P2P networks.

There are many different providers of Usenet access. There are cheaper services like AstraNews (~$10/month) and more expensive services like Giganews ($30/month). The main advantage of ‘premium’ providers is that files uploaded aren’t deleted for much longer (the ‘retention’ period). Giganews hasn’t deleted posts in ~4 years. More expensive providers also offer better speeds and higher ‘completion’ rates (the amount of data that isn’t damaged). It is really a matter of finding what service suits your needs & budget.

There are a number of sites that allow you to search files uploaded to Usenet. You then choose what you want to download and a .NZB file is created. This is opened by a reader (similar to the way you download and open a .TORRENT file). There are a number of readers around, some paid, some free. Personally I use NewsBin Pro, which cost ~$30.

Most files on Usenet are in .RAR format, and are split into multiple segments. In order to compensate for the possibility of some the downloaded data/segments being missing/wrong most file uploaders also include parity data (as .PAR2 files). These check the downloaded data and, if damaged, use a mathematical process (called Reed-Solomon error correction) to repair the data. This is similar to the system used in RAID-5 to allow for one of a collection of hard drives to fail without losing any data. Most readers include the ability to perform these checks, and unpack the .RAR files automatic.

Another paid option is to use one of the premium web file hosts, such as Filesonic or Wupload, along with a file search engine. These sites normally allow free downloading, but with strict limitations (waiting times, having to enter a capacha, limits on the size of files you can download, limits on how much you can download etc…). There is a huge amount of data hosted on these premium services, comparable to Usenet. It is also generally easier to use. Files are often uploaded as-is, rather than in split RARs, and any web browser will download the files.

Currently I am using Giganews & Filesonic as my main file sources. About 90% of the files I want can be found on one of these services.

  • Ben

#4

Ben: Thanks a lot. I have a player that reads rar files. It’s called VLC Media Player.
Thanks for all your information. I was recently looking at that usenet service you mentioned, Astranews, that costs only $10.00 a month. I am new to usenet but I am thinking that maybe I could use it to spread the word about my editing business.
Thanks.
Kim


#5

As a means of advertising I would think going to a paid web-ad service would be a better bet. Most people on Usenet are looking for files, and don’t tend to look at posts (which aren’t picked up by file search engines). Also, depending on the Usenet provider’s ToS posting adverts for your business might well be considered spamming, resulting in sanctions or the disconnection of the service.

  • Ben

#6

[QUOTE=KimberlyFujioka;2614918]"…I have a player that reads [B]rar[/B] files. It’s called VLC Media Player… [/QUOTE]Not sure abouth that… :wink:
(“rar” files are compressed files that you have to uncompress with tools like 7-zip, winrar, aso. before you can read or play them.)

For sure VLC player should be able to read/ play [B]raw[/B] files.

BTW, welcome to forum. :flower:


#7

If there is a supported video file inside VLC can read uncompressed (-m0) .RAR files fine. Compressed RAR files will not work. It also handles split archives fine (on opening the first in the set the rest of the parts are checked, so the length displayed is correct and seeking works fine).

  • Ben

#8

It’s kind of funny - people are wiiling to pay lots of money to binary usenét providers or file hosters in order to get illegit copies of copyrighted material. But they are not willing to pay for the original stuff. :doh:

Michael


#9

[QUOTE=mciahel;2615038]It’s kind of funny - people are wiiling to pay lots of money to binary usenét providers or file hosters in order to get illegit copies of copyrighted material. But they are not willing to pay for the original stuff. :doh:

Michael[/QUOTE]

Are they the same folks who always want the free software to copy movies or capture interweb streams or remove DRM? :confused:


#10

[QUOTE=mciahel;2615038]It’s kind of funny - [B]people are wiiling to pay lots of money to binary usenét providers or file hosters in order to get illegit copies of copyrighted material. But they are not willing to pay for the original[/B] stuff. :doh:

Michael[/QUOTE]

Yeah I could never seem to understand that either :rolleyes: