HP takes action against compatible ink cartridges

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: HP takes action against compatible ink cartridges[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2011/12/hp-logo.jpeg[/newsimage]

In a recent press release Hewlett Packard announced that it was taking legal action worldwide against suppliers of compatible ink cartridges.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/hp-takes-action-against-compatible-ink-cartridges-74280/](http://www.myce.com/news/hp-takes-action-against-compatible-ink-cartridges-74280/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

If HP, and other printer makers, would offer printer consumables at reasonable prices then they wouldn’t need to file any complaints. The reason there is a market for compatibles is because the OEM products are massively overpriced.


#3

There be a Very Easy answer to that—Do NOT buy any HP printers.


#4

I have an aftermarket black cartridge in my HP right now & probably will again if available.
I will say this I took the HP color cartridge to Walgreens to have it refilled .
They were having a “Special” on refills. I did this twice with different HP color cartridges.
It didn’t work either time. I won’t be doing that again.


#5

I haven’t had a HP printer in the past 12 years. Back then the cartridges were huge, so although the branded ink was expensive, they lasted a long time.

Before I buy a printer now, I check a few things - User reviews, compatible ink prices and reviews of that ink. For the printer, reviews commenting about slow to start, paper jams, etc. will usually turn me away. It’s similar for compatible ink issues and with a lot of negative reviews on most HP compatible ink cartridges, it’s pretty clear HP make it difficult to manufacture compatibles for their printers. HP printers also tend to have the most expensive compatible cartridges, which is also an indication that they are difficult to manufacture and likely have a high reject rate.


#6

With most HP ink cartridges the print head is built into the cartridge. So they will always be more expensive than Canon & Epson compatible cartridges, which are just an ink tank. It is also why the majority of HP compatible cartridges are refilled HP originals, rather than newly manufactured…

But it largely eliminates the problem of blocked nozzles. Canon & Epson printers waste a lot of ink flushing the system to avoid blockages. One study some years ago found that Epson printers were wasting up to 50% of the ink, if you print irregularly (although the testing methodology was not ideal). The HP printers were >90% efficient.

Also, printers with a permanent print head cannot risk allowing the ink cartridge to empty completely. And if air does enter the system a lot more ink has to be wasted flushing it out. If the print head is going to be replaced with every new cartridge, there is no risk in allowing the ink to run out completely.

In 2006(?) HP introduced a couple of printers which used a new system with permanent print heads that recycled the flushed ink back into the cartridges, making them nearly 100% efficient. But I don’t know if it is still used on any current printers.


#7

There are many good reasons to avoid HP printers, this is just one of them.
Horrible software & drivers.
Unreliable.
Nonexistent support.
Obscenely expensive to operate.
and, and, and…


#8

Good luck to HP on this one.  Haven’t various printer manufacturers tried this in the past and had it thrown out of court??  I’ve never owned a HP inkjet and don’t intend to  due to the  cost of new carts and their life expectancy.  Had a friend who has had two of them and got so pissed of  with replacing the ink that they both ended up in the recycle and she went and bought a Lazer printer…


#9

I switched to a black and white laser, which happens to be an HP (Laserjet 1018). I rarely print anymore, but have never had to replace the toner. Its been the most economical printer I’ve ever used, since it cost $35 after rebate years ago.

The cost of ink drove me away from ink-jet, and my Epson was terrible about clogging and wasting ink. If you don’t need color, I seriously recommend a laser for light duty printing.


#10

[QUOTE=paulw2;2745533]Good luck to HP on this one.  [B]Haven’t various printer manufacturers tried this in the past and had it thrown out of court??[/B]  I’ve never owned a HP inkjet and don’t intend to  due to the  cost of new carts and their life expectancy.  Had a friend who has had two of them and got so pissed of  with replacing the ink that they both ended up in the recycle and she went and bought a Lazer printer…[/QUOTE]

They have. What HP is doing is the same as Ford and Toyota saying that their customers have to buy Ford/Toyota branded tires, oil filters, brake pads etc.


#11

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2745535]I switched to a black and white laser, which happens to be an HP (Laserjet 1018). I rarely print anymore, but have never had to replace the toner. Its been the most economical printer I’ve ever used, since it cost $35 after rebate years ago.

The cost of ink drove me away from ink-jet, and my Epson was terrible about clogging and wasting ink. If you don’t need color, I seriously recommend a laser for light duty printing.[/QUOTE]

I bought a used HP 5550N of Craigslist and dropped inkjets completely. We order photos offline when needed. The 5550N has toner cartridges with a yield of 12k-13k pages and I can buy a full set of compatible cartridges from eBay for $120-$130. I have been working on the first set of toner cartridges for almost two years.


#12

I just replaced my very old Epson R220 printer with a Canon. So glad I did not buy HP. I suspect if they are successful in shutting down the compatible market for their printers it will only make their products less attractive to buyers.Â


#13

The general business model for inkjet printers is the reverse of most products. They sell the printers for dirt cheap prices and then charge absurd prices for the consumables. Their model is the equivalent of drug dealers giving away crack pipes and then selling the person crack to make money. I had hoped that by now at least one inkjet printer maker would have decided to challenge the current business model by providing decently priced cartridges. I think a company that did this could take a huge chunk of the market and make more money by selling more cartridges at lower margins.


#14

Some years ago, Epson was able to block sales of some types compatible ink tanks in the USA. That didn’t stop the ink sellers from marketing compatibles as “re-manufactured”.


#15

Keurig does the same to coffee makers!!! http://www.slashgear.com/keurig-2-0-pod-drm-will-lock-out-unofficial-coffee-pods-03319137/


#16

Is HP really “protecting” anything, or are they just patent trolling? I guess “protection” means destroying other parties’ products and sucking away their money… much like a burgler with anger management issues. Heaven forbid HP should be forced to actually compete.


#17

I still use a old school HP 990 printer and mostly abandoned the OEM carts when Costco stopped selling two packs somewhat cheap. It has the old school 2 cart LARG cartridge system and it prints wonderfully as long as I can find either good remans or factory carts on ebay that are slightly expired.
My last one was a expired extra large color for like 20 bucks. It was about a year out and one color was plugged but I soaked it in alcohol and primed it, just the head part, and it cleared and works like new again. I’ll keep using it till good carts are no longer available as I can get about 6 months outa the large color and a year outa the black.
I also have a couple of Epsons and while they print well enough the heads clog when they sit unused and turned off so I mostly keep using the HP that every time I replace a cart I get a new head with it.
My mom got a cheap Kodak because the reviews were good and they brag about cheap high quality ink, which seems to be true compared to the big boys. We got it for her a few years ago or more for Xmas and it has a scanner, prints double sided, and the prints look great for I think about 70 bucks. Carts are truly cheap but she’s retired so she still doesn’t replace them like she should but it is a nice machine for the money.
I MAY try one of the newer Epson business class printers that use a new head tech that uses full page nozzles and supposed prints faster and uses way less ink, provided the reviews are good and they don’t clog.
The big printer boys are just trying to protect their huge income stream from over priced ink so everyone sell printers with tiny carts and sues the refill guys to protect their money stream. Lets hope they tick off enough customers they loose market share and decide to make better printers that use cheap ink.