How to?

vbimport

#1

I was reading a post on a site and one of the techs said he was looking for a motherboard that would support XP because he had a client that would not give up XP.

I can find spec sheets for most boards, but I have not been able to understand how to know what OS a board will run before physically having the board. Can someone tell me how this tech could know what OS a board supports before buying the board?

Here’s why I am asking this question. I have, sometimes, access to boards that are removed from computers. I bought an XW-4400 for $3.95 here while back and it runs W10. I have bought boards before that would run nothing newer than Vista. So if I could know what OS’s a board would run I would better know if I want to buy the board, and if I do, what price I might want to pay. i.e. boards that would run w10 I might be willing to pay more than for boards that would only run W7 or W8. Thanks.


#2

Find out the components on the motherboard which need drivers.

Check to see if the drivers exist.

This usually works for retail boards, or for boards from OEM machines where the OEM keeps good document about what makes the board up. It’s even better if you can check the manufacturer’s website (or the OEM’s website) for a list of available drivers.

So you have to know the make & model of the board and see if there’s good document. If not, you’re probably going to need to find out which north bridge and south bridge the board uses (where applicable), as well as all other components (Ethernet controller, audio controller, secondary USB controller, secondary PATA or SATA controllers, verify the processors a board supports, etc).


#3

[QUOTE=Albert;2779002]Find out the components on the motherboard which need drivers.

Check to see if the drivers exist.

This usually works for retail boards, or for boards from OEM machines where the OEM keeps good document about what makes the board up. It’s even better if you can check the manufacturer’s website (or the OEM’s website) for a list of available drivers.

So you have to know the make & model of the board and see if there’s good document. If not, you’re probably going to need to find out which north bridge and south bridge the board uses (where applicable), as well as all other components (Ethernet controller, audio controller, secondary USB controller, secondary PATA or SATA controllers, verify the processors a board supports, etc).[/QUOTE]

I appreciate the response Albert, but how would that tell me the OS supported. Does one go by what the drivers support, etc. Thanks.


#4

In the main, it is “has it got drivers” that decides it, for newer and older, I’ve persuaded Win10 to run on some right old clunkers.

If you can find:
Chipset driver / Intel INF that supports the chipset AND XP (can be an issue, as they are likely to have dropped XP support for anything that wasn’t in circulation before it was EOL)
Graphics Driver (or use a card that IS XP supported)
Sound (similarly, if onboard unsupported, use a suitable sound card)
Ethernet etc.

The other thing, I doubt that XP would run on a UEFI, so traditional BIOS is needed


#5

[QUOTE=Matth;2779022]In the main, it is “has it got drivers” that decides it, for newer and older, I’ve persuaded Win10 to run on some right old clunkers.

If you can find:
Chipset driver / Intel INF that supports the chipset AND XP (can be an issue, as they are likely to have dropped XP support for anything that wasn’t in circulation before it was EOL)
Graphics Driver (or use a card that IS XP supported)
Sound (similarly, if onboard unsupported, use a suitable sound card)
Ethernet etc.

The other thing, I doubt that XP would run on a UEFI, so traditional BIOS is needed[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the reply Matt.