How to verify an Audio CD is burned correctly?

I was wondering what the easiest method to verify that a set of wav or aiff files are burned correctly when making an Audio CD, aside from carefully listening to the whole CD.

I am downloading live music (legal bootlegs, eg., bt.etree.org) as FLAC files, convert these to wav files, then make Audio CDs that I can send out to other people as trades. Once in a while (may 1 in 50 discs), the receiver reports that there was an error in CD, and I have to reburn it for the person.

When burning data files, I can create and verify checksum files, but with Audio CDs, there doesn’t seem to be an analogous method.

Is there a way to compare Spectral Analysis or Frequency Analysis of wav files to show that they are identical?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Ted

As far as I know, an audio CD is not too much different from a data CD, so there should be similar methods of verification. There are burning tools which let you verify your recordings after writing them, but I don’t know whether they also offer that feature for audio CDs.

Anyway, I don’t think you will have to resort to such things as spectral analysis. What you want is a comparison of the data stored in audio tracks with the data stored in the files you loaded, and that’s basically a simple thing.

Thanks for the reply!

What you want is a comparison of the data stored in audio tracks with the data stored in the files you loaded, and that’s basically a simple thing.

One would think, but I am finding it much harder to do than that! If you rename the original wav file to whatever will be burned on the CD (on a Mac, it is “# Audio File.aiff”, where # represents the Track number), make an md5 of it, then make an md5 of the burned track, it is always unidentical.

:confused:

Even if you verify them on your system there’s no guarantee that they’ll play properly on someone elses.
I’d recommend using good media & I’ve found Verbatim Pastels (which are a Taiyo Yuden dye) and Verbatim Super AZO to be very good for me.

possible the original audio files are corrupt, or become corrupt when encoded to wav. i use dbpoweramp to convert audio files to wav prior to burning, & occasionally an mp3 or ogg etc. gets damaged during conversion to wav.
if u r sure this is not the case, try using quality media, slower burning speed, a good cd drive with reputation for quality burning to cd. could also try a disc quality scan with cdspeed after the cd is burned

The problem here is most likely an end-user media issue, or perhaps (PERHAPS) a burning speed issue.

I use decent CD media, but more importantly I don’t burn music at the rated speed of the media. In fact, I don’t burn music at anything above 24x. It’s just asking for trouble. If you REALLY want to be careful, burn at 12x so that the drive never changes speed during the burn.

You can’t do a verify per se on an audio CD, because your PC’s CD/DVD drive can’t read the audio data directly. :wink:

So how come my PC’s CD/DVD drive can play back the audio data at all?

Thanks for the replies, everyone!

Eyeless, thanks for the pointer to cdspeed. Will check it out.

You can’t do a verify per se on an audio CD, because your PC’s CD/DVD drive can’t read the audio data directly.

Gurm, I was suspecting something like this. Can you elaborate, or point me to a link with further information?

Thanks again.

What about ripping the audio tracks back to data files after burning them, and then comparing them with the ones used for burning? If everything worked the way it should, then the files should compare equal, shouldn’t they?

I was wondering what the easiest method to verify that a set of wav or aiff files are burned correctly when making an Audio CD, aside from carefully listening to the whole CD.

If accuracy is what you are after, I recommend using EAC to copy your music CD. EAC is the ONLY one that will compare what is read to what is being written before it writes to disc. Then use cd speed to see the quality of the disc etc. If you need help on setting up EAC just ask.

I misunderstood your original post. I understood it as you are ripping from an original CD.

Hi sambo

Thanks for the reply. I spent the last few days digging around, and also came to the conclusion that EAC could do what I was asking. I basically had to set the read and write offsets for my drive.

EAC and, I also found out, Foobar2000 have options to do a bit-by-bit comparison of the wav files to check if they are identical. By correctly setting the offsets, I am able to burn, and extract without any loss in fidelity. Without adjusting the offsets, the wav files are different (even if they are audibly identical). Interesting!

Thanks to all that replied!

Ted

Welcome to enlightenment tedyun, EAC and foobar are the only ones I use also. I am glad you found out how good these two are. Check out the coaster factory, they have a great tutorial to help you properly configure EAC with your drive.

Welcome to enlightenment tedyun, EAC and foobar are the only ones I use also. I am glad you found out how good these two are. Check out the coaster factory, they have a great tutorial to help you properly configure EAC with your drive. Remember, don’t select C2 error correction in the drive configuration settings even if your drive claims to have C2 error correction. Many manufacturers claim to have error correction but there is no standard that they follow, this forces EAC to varify each rip.

Hi Sambo,

I actually printed out the Coaster Factory tutorial months ago, but it is so thick that I never went through it until now. It’s very good!

So in trading live music, where there are no gaps between tracks, or if one track leads into another (ie., a jam), if people don’t correctly set their offsets, eventually there will be loss as the CD is passed down generations?

Thanks again

Ted