How to store hundreds of loose discs?

vbimport

#1

Binders are expensive and a PITA to reorganize, if you’re into the alphabet and finding films easily.

The spindles that come with blank media are the cheapest means to store discs. Obviously, they provide the means to store every blank disc you buy. But, again, there’s the alphabet and trouble reorganizing discs. And who wants to dig for something at the bottom of a spindle?

I would imagine a box of some sort, a foot long, five inches wide and tall, would be the best way to store discs–vertically, similar to comic book boxes or old record shelves. That way, new discs could be added alphabetically with ease.

Anyone know of something like this or something better?

5"(L) x 5"(W) x 5"(H) - Staples® Corrugated Shipping Boxes

If these were 10" or longer, they would rock. It seems that longer boxes have the opening at the smaller end–the exact opposite of what I would want.


#2

Think “trays”. Think of a record-shop’s ‘tray’ concept where disks are stored in a tray configuration.

Shelves, therefore, aren’t using their linearity as the first storage limit, but their width can effectively support trays of X-length - you’ll figure out safety limits based on shelf width. If you have trays of 100-200 disks, then shelf-storage limits are exponentially increased.

Standard DVD cases are perhaps a half-inch, or the slims can take 4 to an inch. A shelf that’s 4-feet long can hold (4x12=48 inches X 4 slim-line DVDs per inch = 192 DVDs, for example.

A tray that’s 7-inches wide (wide enough for a commercial DVD to face forward) might hold 150 disks, or 200 or much more. So, that 48-inch shelf can hold 6 trays X 150 = 900 DVDs. Quite an increase.

Shelves with 5-, 6- or 8-levels get all the larger numeric increases.

Reorganizing - inserting new additions - is a matter of inserting a new tray and grabbing handfuls of disks from one tray and moving it to another.

This, by the way, is the path to collector-itis, you realize. Yet, I’ve never met anyone who buys home-videos that doesn’t try to keep them. Therefore, a collection is started. God help the collectors and all other addicts.

Next thing you’ll foolishly ponder is, “How can I catalog them so I don’t buy multiple copies?” Oh geez… just roll up yer arm and insert the needle!


#3

The best solution is the DJ style cases that I posted about a while ago here.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#4

For a less than best solution & one that might make you fat.
A friend of mine would buy these snack crackers from Sam’s Club.
The box is the perfect size for jewel cases & they work for paper sleeves too.
http://www.samsclub.com/sams/austin-cheese-crackers-with-peanut-butter-45-ct/162153.ip


#5

[QUOTE=cholla;2710350]For a less than best solution & one that might make you fat.
A friend of mine would buy these snack crackers from Sam’s Club.
The box is the perfect size for jewel cases & they work for paper sleeves too.
http://www.samsclub.com/sams/austin-cheese-crackers-with-peanut-butter-45-ct/162153.ip[/QUOTE]

And you get to eat the contents too! :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

My solution:

Custom cabinets with slide out drawers, partitions of the correct size and individual slim cases for my backup discs.



#7

These boxes are usually available in a 3 pack at Best Buy or other places online and work great with inexpensive paper sleeves. There is another size for DVD case.

http://www.storables.com/snap-n-store-cd-storage-box-black.html?gclid=CNvv4YvF_roCFU5o7AodyjcA0g[/IMG][/QUOTE]