How to put a SSD drive in my Dell XPS 15

vbimport

#1

Hello,

Is is possible to upgrade my Dell XPS 15 with a SSD? Can I just open it and replace the HDD with a SSD, will it then boot to Windows? Please let me know!


#2

[QUOTE=Afferz;2654286]Hello,

Is is possible to upgrade my Dell XPS 15 with a SSD? Can I just open it and replace the HDD with a SSD, will it then boot to Windows? Please let me know![/QUOTE]
You can replace the hdd with an SSD for sure, just make sure you backup your OS and data with a program like Acronis and then Clone the new SSD, or put a whole fresh install of Windows 7 on your new SSD, thats what I would do.


#3

[QUOTE=alan1476;2654297]You can replace the hdd with an SSD for sure, just make sure you backup your OS and data with a program like Acronis and then Clone the new SSD, or put a whole fresh install of Windows 7 on your new SSD, thats what I would do.[/QUOTE]

Or somewhere in between a cloning and a fresh install: Windows Easy Transfer (part of Win 7). Save all your data and settings (you get to choose what to keep), install windows and restore your data and settings.


#4

I think the clone is the easiest. But then I have to connect both drives? How to do that?


#5

Cloning will need to be done from another desktop PC - something that can plug in your Original Dell C: HDD and the New Dell SSD Drive, then clone the Orig HDD onto the SSD.

Or…

Dell’s CONTROL PANEL will have a Recovery Disk option that should be your first operation. This will ‘build’ a DVD (and maybe a CD, too) of the original setup for this Dell unit. Just like you received it, out of the box.

Once those are built, you can remove your original HDD and replace it with the SSD. Boot up to the Recovery DVD (or CD - whichever is #1 in that process - it will tell you to label it) and it will re-load Win and all other software.

This way, you don’t have to worry about partitioning (Cloning will be difficult because you’re going from a Larger-Capacity HDD to a smaller SSD, probably, yes?).

You’ll probably want to build other CD-DVD backups for your data files, by the way, or you can get one of those USB-SATA-IDE connectors to plug in the original HDD after the SSD is loaded and running, and then your Orig HDD can become essentially an external drive. Once I gleaned all the data-files from it, though, I’d reformat it so it wouldn’t be a boot drive. Although it might be nice to leave it, as is, just in case the SSD failed.

Some notebooks’ HDD spaces are slightly larger than some SSDs. We sometimes use small rubber pads similar to

as ‘support padding’. They come in a variety of sizes and different vendors, too, and can be cut to fit.


#6

Thanks a lot for the detailed information, I will try it and report back!


#7

By the way, the “cloning needs another system” - I meant like a desktop PC with at least two open SATA connectors on it. That desktop’s original C: Drive would stay in-place as its bootable drive, but then I’d plug in the Dell Bootable Drive and your new SSD as additional drives (E:? F:? Whatever) and then I’d be cloning E: onto F:. Something like that.

But the formal Rescue/Recovery Disks should be created first, before disassembling the Dell. And maybe back up any other data files, Favorites lists, special fonts, etc.