? How to make long playing Car Stereo MP3 Disc?

vbimport

#1

Hello, thank you for any assistance you can give me.
(Even if it is just to tell me that it isn’t possible.:doh: )

I have bought many cd’s, including audio books.
I also have a 2008 Toyota Corolla with MP3 multi-disc playing car stereo.
Having the 6 disc changer in-dash is good, however -

What I would like to do is condense my cd’s into a MP3 disc that plays for hours, rather than the standard 80 mins max on a CD.

I have a couple of mp3 disc audio books that have 11hrs for eg. playing on the one disc. They work in my car stereo too.

How do I create such a disc from my normal cd’s please? I am guessing it is by burning them onto a DVD disc instead of a CD. However, I have never burnt DVD’s before, although I have a DVD burner in my PC. Having googled a bit, I have read about DVD Audio , Audio DVD and Data DVD discs. I am not sure what to create, nor how to create it.
In my first attempt, I have ripped my audio book into mp3 files via Windows Media Player. This may not even be the correct start of course…
… but I don’t know what to do or what program to use next.

I downloaded a program called Advanced WMA, however haven’t clicked on the .exe file to install it as I am not sure if it is the solution to my problem.

Thank you very much for any help you can give me.
My apologies for this no doubt being such a basic question,
but I have enough shiny drink coasters created already…


#2

Forget about DVD. It will not play in your car player.
To do CD, rip them to hard drive, they will be wav format, convert to mp3 and burn to CD.
If you mp3 book play, than you should have no problem with music.


#3

Follows CDuncle advice and, burn w/Nero as CD-R as MP3 CD.

:slight_smile:


#4

Hi ane Welcome!

[quote=ALLI;2154647]
What I would like to do is condense my cd’s into a MP3 disc that plays for hours, rather than the standard 80 mins max on a CD.
[…]
How do I create such a disc from my normal cd’s please?[/quote]You need an audio CD ripper like CDexor EAC. These will help you to read the tracks of your audio CDs and save them as mp3 onto your harddisc.
Have the manual of your car stereo at hand and check, what formats are supported, and configure the mp3 encoder accordingly if necessary. (see screenshot)

With about 100 tracks on one disc, you’d surely be happy if you can see track and artist information. This is stored in the mp3 tag information. Again, check the car stereo manual for further information. Adjust the “Tagging” settings accordingly. (see screenshot)
(If you have to rework or edit the tags of your mp3 files, you should have a look at mp3tag.)

I am guessing it is by burning them onto a DVD disc instead of a CD.
No, it’s a data CD.
Again, have a look into your car stereo manual if there is any information about the burning parameters.
Nero does have a “MP3 disc” project (in the music section), but this didn’t work for me. Maybe I did something wrong. I finally used ImgBurn and set the parameters that were described in my car stereo’s manual manually.

Why did I mention “read the manual” so often? Well, I wasted several discs until I got results that worked perfectly with my unit :wink:

Michael




#5

Thankyou to each of you for your replies. I will investigate my car stereo manual in regards to the settings as you have mentioned, thanks.

I haven’t performed your new suggestions yet, however from my experimenting last night, using Windows Media Player:
One thing I don’t understand is that I could rip the CD tracks from my original CD straight into a mp3 format, and then when I went to burn the CD I could still only fit up to 79 mins of track time onto the CD, thus negating any benefit for changing the format as I still couldn’t get more than the usual playing time on the CD.
Maybe I am missing something here, but by converting my CD into mp3 whilst ripping the CD tracks seems to make a 2min 30 sec track still occupy 2 min 30 sec of space on my 80 min CD.

On earlier occassions, when I have previously backed up a bought mp3 book audio CD, I have been able to make my backup by simply using WMPlayer and it created a disc that did play for 11hrs. WMP was at its default settings, I didn’t tell it to rip into an mp3 format, I just ripped it and burnt it without changing any of the usual settings it uses. This backup played in my car stereo no problems.

What would be the explanation for what is happening in these situations?

Do I need to aim for a different format for the file to get more data on a standard CD disc?

Thank you very much for your patience, I hope my questions aren’t too stupid.:flower:


#6

The number of songs depend on the bitrate that the mp3s are encoded at. The lower the bitrate, the more songs you’ll be able to fit on the disc.If using say for example a bitrate of 128kbps on a 3+min song should result in a 3~4MB file…
Do the math for a 650-700MB CD disc…
Keep in mind that the lower the birate used the lower the quality…For car audio CD 128-192kbps is what I normally use…

http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=LAME


#7

Use CDex or EAC as outlined in Post #4 (mciahel’s) - it will work.

One thing I don’t understand is that I could rip the CD tracks from my original CD straight into a mp3 format, and then when I went to burn the CD I could still only fit up to 79 mins of track time onto the CD, thus negating any benefit for changing the format as I still couldn’t get more than the usual playing time on the CD.
… [B]What would be the explanation for what is happening in these situations?[/B]

My best explanation is that you ripped the files to MP3 format (this is good) but you then told the burning program to burn the disc as audio which took you back to a limit of approximately 80 minutes. Plus, you lost quality as you went from audio format (WAV) to MP3 and then reencoded those files back to audio (WAV).

You should be able to get 200+ songs per CD which would be many, many hours of music. The format you want to follow is a DATA CD (the MP3 formats will not be converted).


#8

Hi,[QUOTE=ALLI;2154912]
I haven’t performed your new suggestions yet, however from my experimenting last night, using Windows Media Player:
One thing I don’t understand is that I could rip the CD tracks from my original CD straight into a mp3 format, and then when I went to burn the CD I could still only fit up to 79 mins of track time onto the CD,[/quote]You were using WMP for burning? That’s the problem. WMP creates audio CDs from your mp3 files. You want a data disc to enjoy the benefit of the compressed material.
If you like it, you can use WMP to rip your CDs to mp3, but you need other software to burn them (as data disc).

Michael


#9
  1. Rip your Audio CD’s to MP3 using Window Media player (as you are doing).
    Please check your settings that you are ripping as MP3’s & not as WMA.

  2. Using any CD writing program create a “DATA CD” and drag & drop your MP3’s into the compilation & burn.

If you are limited to 70-80 minutes, then you have selected the “AUDIO CD” rather than “DATA CD”.

MP3’s are audio DATA.
CD Audio is raw AUDIO.

If you aren’t sure how to burn a CD in data mode . download imgburn V2.4.2 (it’s free), install it, run it & select “Write Files & Folder to Disc”.

Best writing program ever :smiley: